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Full text of "General catalog : announcements and faculty list ..."

JLLETIN, IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



VOL. 1, NO. 2 



JUNK, 1903 



CATALOG 

Iowzk State College 

Ames, Iowa 



1 902- 1 903 



PUBI 1SHED BY THE COLLEGE, AT LEAST FOUR NUM- 
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AT THE POST OFFICE, AMES, IOWA, AS SECOND CLASS 

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IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

»1y 



.OF. 



AGRICULTURE 



.AND. 



THE MECHANIC ARTS 



CATALOG 1902-1903 



"SCIENCE WITH PRACTICE" 



1903 

BY THE COLLEGE 

AMES 



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.. :|26 27|28j29]30 







CALENDAR FOR 1903-1904 



1903. 

First Term of College Year begins Tues., Sept. 1. 

Entrance Examinations, Tues.-Wed., Sept. 1-2. 

Recitations begin, Thurs., Sept. 3. 

Thanksgiving Day, Thurs., Nov. 26. 

Term Examinations, Dec, 21-22. 

Winter Vacation, Dec. 22, 1903, to Jan. 19, 1904. 

1904. 

Second Term of College Year begins Tues., Jan. 19. 

Entrance Examinations Tues.-Wed., Jan. 19-20. 

Recitations begin Thurs., Jan. 21. 

Memorial Day, Mon., May 30. 

Baccalaureate Address Sun., June 5. 

Term Examinations June 6-7 

Commencement Wed., June 8. 



t" - 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Hon. J. B. Hungerford, Carroll Chairman 

W. J. Dixon, Ames Acting Secretary 

Herman Knapp, Ames Treasurer 

W. A. Helsell, Odebolt Financial Secretary 

John Franklin Cavell, Ames Custodian 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Ex-officio — Hon. Albert B. Cummins, Governor of Iowa. 
Ex-oflicio — Hon. R. C. Barrett, Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion. 

Term Expires. 

First District — Hon. S. H. Watkins, Libertyville 1904 

Second District — Hon. C. S. Barclay, West Liberty 1904 

Third District — Hon. E. A. Alexander, Clarion 1908 

Fourth District — Hon. C. L. Gabrilsen, New Hampton 1904 

Fifth District— Hon. W. R. Moninger, Galvin 1906 

Sixth District— Hon. W. O. McElroy, Newton 1908 

Seventh District — Hon. W. K. Boardman, Nevada 1906 

Eighth District— Hon. W. B. Penick, Chariton 1904 

Ninth District — Hon. James H. Wilson, Adair 1908 

Tenth District — Hon. J. B. Hungerford, Carroll 1906 

Eleventh District— Hon. W. J. Dixon, Sac City 1906 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

GROUP I. 

Finance Committee: Gov. Cummins, Trustees McElroy, Barclay, 

Penick, Alexander, Hungerford. 
Building Committee: Trustees Dixon, Hungerford, Boardman; 

additional members, Watkins, Gabrilsen. 

GROUP II. 

Committee on Agriculture, Horticulture, Experiment Station and 
Veterinary Science: Trustees Barclay, Boardman, Moninger, 
Wilson, Gov. Cummins. 

Committee on Engineering Departments and Physics: Trustees 
Gabrilsen, Barrett, McElroy, Hungerford, Dixon. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 7 

Committee on College Hospital and Sanitary Arrangements: 
Trustees Watkins, Moninger, Penick. 

GROUP III. 

Committee on Faculty and Courses of Study: Trustees McElroy, 
Barrett, Hungerford, Gabrilsen, Alexander, Dixon. 

Committee on College Lands and Investments: Trustees Penick, 
Moninger, Gov. Cummins. 

Committee on Rules: Trustees Wilson, Boardman, Alexander. 

GROUP IV. 

Committee on Scientific Departments: Trustees Alexander, Ga- 
brilsen, Barrett, McElroy, Watkins. 

Committee on Literary Departmjents and, Library: Trustees? 
Wilson, Boardman, Barrett, Alexander, Penick. 

Committee on Public Grounds and Assignment of Rooms: Trus- 
tees Hungerford, Alexander, Barclay. 

Committee on Bonds: Trustees Moninger, Wilson. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held in June. 
Other meetings are held as may be necessary. 




THE LATE PRESIDENT BEARDSHEAR. 



William Miller Beardshear was born at Dayton, Ohio, Novem- 
ber 7, 1850; spent his boyhood on the farm; entered the army 
of the Cumberland at fourteen years of age; was educated in 
the public schools of Ohio; took B. A. and M. A. degrees, Otter- 
bein University, Ohio; took two years post graduate work at 
Yale University; had the degree of LL. D.; was President of 
Western College, Toledo, Iowa, '81-'89, at that time was one of 
the youngest college presidents in the United States; Superin- 
tendent of City Schools, Des Moines, Iowa, '89-'91; President of 
the Iowa State Teachers' Association, 1894; served a term on 
the executive committee of the Iowa State Teachers' Association; 
was director of the N. E. A. from Iowa for a number of years; 
was President, one year, of the Department of Manual Industry 
and Training, National Educational Association; President of 
the Iowa State Improved Stock Breeders' Association, 1899; 
member of the United States Indian Commission, 1897-1902; was 
juror on Educational Awards at the Pan-American Exposition, 
Buffalo, 1901; President National Educational Association, 
1901-'02; President Iowa State College, Ames, 1891-1902. Died 
August 5, 1902 — Ames, Iowa. 



10 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY TRIBUTE 



The faculty of the Iowa State College, moved by feelings of 
profound sorrow and deepest sympathy in the great loss of our 
lamented President, hereby unite in expression of the following 
appreciation. 

The loss of an eminent leader in any rank of life is a mis- 
fortune of far reaching consequence but the loss of a great leader 
of educational and moral forces is especially to be deplored. It 
rarely falls to the lot of any man to possess in such large measure 
the general esteem and confidence, and to impress so deeply for 
good, the lives of so many people of all classes, as was reached 
and influenced by Dr. Beardshear. No one could know him but 
to be the better for his acquaintance. His genial personality, 
gentleness and strength, were ever a source of renewed energy 
and higher endeavor. His labors as President of the Iowa State 
College were the crowning work of a fruitful life. Coming to 
the institution at a critical period, he rendered an eminent 
service which was the product of a master mind and genius. His 
personal achievements were of the highest order but in addition 
he possessed that rare and essential quality of every great leader, 
— the faculty of developing and stimulating the best that is in 
every one else. 

The leadership of President Beardshear was in every way 
typical of a great life, such a life as Lowell characterized in the 
following lines: 

All thoughts that mould the age begin 
Deep down within the primitive soul, 

And from the many slowly upward win, 
To one who grasps the whole. 

The deep, silent forces and the earnest, exalted purposes 
that were the source of power in President Beardshear's life, 
were manifest in all his work. His plans, born of a large heart, 
a keen perception and intuitive mind, were always broad and 
progressive and typical of his inspiring faith, and his generous 
and magnanimous nature. His work was peculiarly original; 



FACULTY TRIBUTE 11 

striking in conception, and masterful in execution. Though 
entering a new field on assuming the duties of executive of an 
Agricultural and Mechanical College, his broad sympathies with 
humanity, and his active interest in the industrial professions, 
enabled him at once to grasp the needs and understand the 
functions and purposes of the land-grant colleges so compre- 
hensively and intelligently that he became the acknowledged 
leader in the ranks of all similar institutions of America, and 
he was unanimously accorded the distinguished honor of the 
presidency of the National Educational Association, an honor 
never before conferred upon a citizen of Iowa, or an officer of a 
land-grant college. It was his work more than that of any other 
man of his time that served to place industrial and practical 
education in its true light, and to command the respect and 
admiration of the educational forces of the world. 

His prophetic vision, his keen perception and accurate 
analysis, and above all, his sublime faith, were inspiring to all 
who came under the influence of his magic power, and his quali- 
ties of leadership were inherent and without effort. 

President Beardshear was an ideal leader and director of 
the efforts and work of his assistants, the faculty and instructors 
of this college. As a leader he foresaw the needs, secured the 
material means, and selected those who could best assist him 
in carrying out his plans. As a director of our efforts and 
work, he had the happy way of placing and inspiring confidence 
so that effort was united, and work was done without friction 
and with results fruitful along the lines he had laid down for the 
guidance of the institution to the permanent success which he 
desired. 

To his associates he manifested the purest friendship and 
the noblest manhood; and more than leader and director, Presi- 
dent Beardshear was a friend to each and all of us and his friend- 
ship was the reward most sought by his co-workers of the faculty, 
and furnished sufficient inspiration for untiring energy on our 
part during his life, and now strengthens and inspires us to 
carry on the task so well begun under his wise, energetic and 
friendly direction. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 13 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc., 

Acting President and Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 

Lecturer in Veterinary Science. 

J. L. BUDD, M. H., 

Professor Emeritus in Horticulture. 

GEN. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN. 

Professor of Military Science. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

LOUIS HERMANN PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. S., Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

HON. JAMES WILSON, M. S. A., 

Lecturer in Agriculture. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

JULIUS BUEL WEEMS, Ph. D., 

Chemist of the Experiment Station. 

CHARLES F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Dean of Agriculture and Director of Experiment Station. 

MISS LIZZIE M. ALLIS, B. A., M. A., 

Professor of French and German. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc, 

Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology and Mining Engineering. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Professor of Zoology. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. 0., 

Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 



14 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

JOHN J. REPP, V. M. D., 

Professor of Pathology and Histology. 

GEORGE LEWIS McKAY, 

Professor of Dairying. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 

Professor of History and Philosophy. 

JOHN H. McNEALL, V. M. D., 

Dean of Veterinary Science and Professor of Anatomy and Principles and 

Practice of Surgery. 

MISS MARY A. SABIN, B. A., 

Professor of Domestic Economy. 

HOMER CHARLES PRICE, M. S. A., 
Professor of Horticulture and Forestry. 

WILLARD JOHN KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry and Vice Director Experiment Station. 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Sanitary Science. 

PERRY G. HOLDEN, M. Sc, B. Pd., 

Professor of Agronomy and Vice Dean. 

WARREN H. MEEKER, M. E., 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

BURTON S. LANPHEAR, M. M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

L. E. ASHBAUGH, B. S. in E., Ph. B m 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS ELMINA T. WILSON, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

ARTHUR T. ERWIN, M. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

F. R. MARSHALL, B. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

LOUIS EMMANUEL YOUNG, B. Mm. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. 

HERBERT W. DOW, B. S., M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

WALTER A. STUHR, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Physiology and Therapeutics. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 15 

FRANK J. RESLER, B. Ph., 

Director of Music, Vocalist. 

WILBERT EUGENE HARRIMAN, B. Sc, M. D., 

College Physician. 

MRS. MARIAN H. KILBOURNE, B. L., 

Dean of Women. 

TALBOT LENNOX, 

Instructor in Machine Shop. 

EZRA C. POTTER, 

Instructor in Pattern Shop. 

MRS. ELIZABETH RESLER, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Instrumental Music. 

MISS LOLA PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

IRA A. WILLIAMS, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Geology and Mining Engineering. 

MlriS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Di., 

Instructor in English. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

E. B. TUTTLE, B. S. in E. E., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS HELEN G. REED, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS GRACE I. NORTON, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

FRANK W. BOUSKA, M. Sc A., 

Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 

MISS ADA J. MILLER, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. Sc, 

Instructor in Zoology 



16 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

MISS SADIE HOOK, B. L., 

Instructor in Elocution and Physical Culture for Women. 

CHESTER M. PERRIN, B. Sc, 

Instructor in History. 

BENJAMIN H. HIBBARD, B. Ac, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Economic Science. 

F. WENNER, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS BERYL A. HOYT, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS FRANCES M. WILLIAMS, 

Instructor in Domestic Art. 

MISS ALICE MERRITT, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Domestic Science. 

MISS ANNIE W. FLEMING, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS FLORENCE BARBER, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Domestic Science. 

MISS MAE MILLER, B. Sc, 

Instructor in History. 

M. P. CLEGHORN, B. Sc m E. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

J. E. STEWART, B. C. E., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

MISS ORA F EDGETT, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

C. LARSON, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Dairying. 

WARD JONES, B. C. E., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

W. H. STEVENSON, A. B., 

Instructor in Soil Physics. 

W. H. OLIN, M. Sc, 

Instructor in Farm Crops. 

H. R. WATKINS, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

R. C. McKINNEY, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 17 

J. A. KNESCHE, 

Instructor in Forge Work. 

MISS ESTELLE D. FOGEL, B. A n 

Assistant in Botany. 

ALFRED ATKINSON, 

Assistant in Agronomy. 

EDWARD E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

HARVA OTIS, 

Assistant in Machine Shop. 

T. R. AGG, 

Assistant in Foundry. 

R. J. KINZER, B. S. A., 

Farm Superintendent. 

WM KRIEGER, B. S. A., 

Gardener. 

MISS VINA E. CLARK, 

Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE STEVENS, B. L., 

Assistant Librarian. 



18 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



E. W. STANTON, M. Sc, 
Acting President. 

C. F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Director. 

J. B. WEEMS, Ph. D., 

Chemist. 

L. H. PAMMEL, B. Ac, M. Sc, Pn. D., 

Botanist. 

H. E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Kntomologi>t. 

H. C. PRICE, M. S. A., 

Horticulturist. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

A.nimal Husbandry and Vice Director. 

J. J. REPP, V. M. D., 

Veterinarian. 

G. L. McKAY, 

Dairyman. 

P. G. HOLDEN, M. Sc, B. Pd., 

Agronomist. 

W. H. STEVENSON, A. H., 

Soils. 

F. W. BOUSKA, B. S. A., 

Dairy Bacteriologist. 

E. E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant Horticulturist. 

E. C. MYERS, B. S. A., 

Assistant Chemist. 

C. LARSON, B. S. A., 

Assistant Dairyman. 

G. W. LUMMIS, 

Assistant Botanist. 

W. H. OLIN, M. Sc, 

Assistant Agronomist. 

ALFRED ATKINSON, 

Assistant Agronomist. 

CHARLOTTE M. KING, 

Artist. 



HISTORICAL 



LOCATION 



BUILDINGS. GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS 



20 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



HISTORICAL 



In 1858 the Legislature of Iowa passed an act to establish 
"A State Agricultural College and Model Farm," to be connected 
with the entire agricultural interests of the State; appointed a 
board of commissioners to buy a farm and erect a college build- 
ing, and elected a board of trustees to select a faculty and organ- 
ize a college. In 1859 a farm of six hundred and forty acres, 
situated near Ames, was purchased for the use of the college. 
The farm now contains eight hundred and forty acres. 

In 1862 a bill was passed by Congress, entitled, "An act 
donating public lands to the several States and Territories, 
which may provide colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and the 
Mechanic Arts." 

Section 1 of this act provides that for the support of such 
colleges there be granted "an amount of public land, to be appor- 
tioned to each State in quantity to equal thirty thousand acres 
for each Senator and Representative in Congress to which the 
States are respectively entitled by the apportionment under the 
census of 1860; provided that no mineral lands shall be selected 
or purchased under the provisions of this act." 

Section 4 requires: "That all moneys derived from the sale 
of lands aforesaid by the States to which lands are apportioned, 
and from the sale of land script, hereinbefore provided for, shall 
constitute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain 
forever undiminished (except as may be provided for in section 
fifth of this act), and the interest of which shall inviolably be 
apportioned by each State which may take and claim the benefit 
of this act, to the endowment, support and maintenance of at 
least one college, where the leading object shall be, without 
excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are 
related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as 
the Legislature of the State may provide, in order to promote 
the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in 
the several pursuits and professions of life." 

Section 5 says: "And be it further enacted, that the grant 
of land and land script hereby authorized, shall be made on the 
following conditions, to which, as well as the provisions herein- 



HISTORICAL 21 

before contained, the previous assent of the several States shall 
be signified by legislative acts; first, ir any portion of the fund, 
invested as provided by the foregoing section, or any portion of 
the interest thereon, shall, by any action or contingency, be 
diminished or lost, it shall be replaced by the State to which it 
belongs, so that the capital of the fund shall remain forever 
undiminished; and the annual interest shall be regularly applied 
without diminution to the purposes mentioned in the fourth sec- 
tion of this act, except that a sum not exceeding ten per centum 
upon the amount received by any State under the provisions 
of this act, may be expended for the purchase of land for sites 
or experimental farms, wherever authorized by the respective 
Legislatures of said States. Second, no portion of said fund nor 
the interest thereon shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under 
any pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation or 
repair of any building or buildings." 

The General Assembly of Iowa, September 11, 1862, accepted 
the grant upon the conditions and under the restrictions con- 
tained in the act of Congress, and by so doing entered into con- 
tract with the General Government to erect and keep in repair all 
buildings necessary for the use of the College. By this action of 
the General Assembly the College was changed from an agricul- 
tural institution into a College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 
with the broad and liberal course of study outlined in the follow- 
ing paragraph. 

In 1882 the General Assembly passed an act defining the 
course of study to be pursued as follows: Section 1. That section 
1621 of the Code is hereby repealed and the following is enacted 
in lieu thereof: "Section 1621. There shall be adopted and 
taught in the State Agricultural College, a broad, liberal and 
practical course of study, in which the leading branches of learn- 
ing shall relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts, and which 
shall also embrace such other branches of learning as will most 
practically and liberally educate the agricultural and industrial 
classes in the several pursuits and professions of life, including 
military tactics. Section 2. That all acts, and parts of acts incon- 
sistent with this act are hereby repealed." 

August 30th the following act was approved by President 
Harrison: "Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Represen- 
tatives of the United States in Congress assembled, that there 
shall be and hereby is, annually appropriated, out of any moneys 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, arising from the sales 



22 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

of public lands, to be paid as hereinafter provided, to each State 
and Territory for the more complete endowment and mainten- 
ance of colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic 
arts now established, or which may hereafter be established, in 
accordance with an act of Congress approved July second, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-two, the sum of fifteen thousand 
dollars for the year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and 
ninety, and an annual increase of the amount of such appropria- 
tion thereafter for ten years by an additional sum of one thousand 
dollars over the preceding year, and the annual amount to be 
paid thereafter to each State and Territory shall be twenty-five 
thousand dollars, to be applied only to instruction in agriculture, 
the mechanic arts, the English language and the various branches 
of mathematical, physical, natural and economic science, with 
special reference to their application in the industries of life, and 
to facilities for such instruction." 

The income of the College from National grants is therefore 
expended in instruction, experimentation and illustration in agri- 
culture and in the mechanic arts, and in underlying and related 
science and literature. 

All buildings are erected and all repairs thereon are made 
by the State of Iowa, the cost down to date being about $600,000. 

The College was formally opened on the 17th of March, 1869. 



AMES AND THE COLLEGE 23 



AMES AND THE COLLEGE 



The College occupies a delightful and healthful location upon 
high rolling land, just west of Ames, Story County. The railroad 
facilities for reaching Ames from every part of the State are 
excellent. It is at the junction of the Des Moines and the north- 
western branches and the main line of the Chicago & North- 
western R. R. The main line of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 
Paul intersects the Northwestern at Slater, eleven miles south, 
and the through line of the same system at Algona on the north. 
The main line of the Illinois Central intersects the Chicago & 
Northwestern at Webster City, just north, and the main line of 
the Iowa Central makes good connections at Marshalltown on the 
east. All the railway connections of Des Moines have thirty- 
seven miles to Ames. The Chicago & Northwestern Railway has 
frequent trains, Des Moines to Ames and return. A steam motor 
railway connects Ames and the College with efficient service. 
Ames is a most desirable town for wholesome college influences. 
Its people are enterprising, thrifty and cordial. The town has an 
excellent system of public schools, numerous churches, water 
works, electric lights, and a good city government. It affords 
wholesome surroundings for the students. It is an inviting com- 
munity for families who wish to educate their children, enjoy 
the better elements of society and an environment of reasonable 
expenses. The town and the College are on very cordial terms, 
and its citizens take marked pains in the efforts of the students 
and the highest interests of the College. It is a model location 
for factories and business enterprises. 



24 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS 



BUILDINGS. 



Eighteen commodious buildings have been erected by the 
State, for the exclusive use of the various departments of the 
College, besides the dwelling houses and buildings for farm stock, 
machinery and work. 

All these buildings are heated by steam and lighted by 
electricity. Pure water is supplied to all of the buildings. 

There are two rooming cottages, brick buildings, affording 
rooms for ninety-four students. 

The other buildings are as follows, used for recitation and 
lecture rooms and laboratories: 

Chemical Hall: Brick, three stories throughout; steam heat; 
water and gas. Laboratory outfit complete for 100 students in 
Chemistry. 

Veterinary Hospital: Brick, three stories, containing offices, 
dissecting rooms, and all modern appliances for the treatment 
of diseased animals. 

Sanitary Hall: Frame, two stories; lower floor, office, 
kitchen and dining room for the hospital patients and rooms for 
convalescents; upper floor, seven rooms for care of sick among 
the students. 

Engineering Laboratory: Brick, four stories, including 
basement, and large "L," containing machine shops, and the 
engineering laboratory, for the departments of Mechanical and 
Civil Engineering. 

The Wood Shop: Brick, containing carpenter and pattern 
shops, with power and hand tools complete for wood work, and 
outfit of tools for individual work. 

Forge Shop and Foundry: Brick, containing complete equip- 
ment for forging and moulding. 

Engineering nail: The Engineering Departments occupy 
the new Engineering Hall. This is a fire-proof building in which 
all the engineering departments have offices, recitation and 
lecture rooms, laboratories and engineering museum. This build- 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENT 25 

ing is of Bedford stone, has plate glass windows, and modern 
conveniences and furnishings throughout. It is the best engin- 
eering building at present west of the Mississippi river. 

Power House: Brick, one story, contains engine and boiler, 
furnishing power for the shops, and accommodates experimental 
work of the course in Mechanical Engineering. The dynamos and 
motor power for electric engineering are now in this building, 
also the deep well pump. 

Locomotive Laboratory: This building contains an eight- 
wheel locomotive and tender presented by the Chicago & North- 
western Railway Company. 

Music Hall: Brick, two stories, fitted up with apparatus and 
instruments for practice and instruction. 

The Administrative Building: Brick, for the use of trustees 
and faculty, and for offices of the president, secretary and treas- 
urer. 

Dwelling Houses: Eighteen comfortable dwelling houses on 
the grounds are occupied by professor's families, and several 
others by foremen and employes. 

Morrill Hall is named in honor of Hon. Justin S. Morrill, the 
originator of the "Land Grant" for Colleges of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts. The building cost about $35,000, including water 
supply, steam heat and electric light. It is of deep red brick, 
with stone foundation, and stone, brick and terra cotta trimmings 
interblended. 

It stands on the high ground of the beautiful campus, north 
of and near the main building. It is for Chapel, capacity, 650; 
Library, containing 15,000 volumes; the Museum, Lecture Rooms 
and Laboratories of the Departments of Zoology and Geology. 

Agricultural Hall is a four-story building. The lower stories 
are composed of stone from the State quarries at Anamosa, and 
the upper stories are brick. It contains rooms for Horticulture, 
Agriculture, Agricultural Chemistry, Experiment Station work 
and Veterinary Medicine. It is finely lighted and heated and 
contains modern improvements. 

Green House: Contains propagating room, palm house and 
modern green house facilities. 

The Horticultural Laboratory is a building 35x50 feet, two 
stories with basement. It is connected wih the green house. 
The main room contains desk room and lockers for 25 students. 
Adjoining is a pomology room with bench room for 25 students 
to work in the study of fruits. The building is provided with two 



26 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

refrigerators, one for experimental work in cold storage and the 
other for storing fruits for class purposes. The second floor is 
provided with horticultural museum and facilities for photogra- 
phy. 

Horse Barn and Stock Pavilion: A new barn composed of 
brick, slate roof, has just been completed for horses, the storage 
of grain and general farm purposes. One of the best stock pavil- 
ions in the country accommodating several hundred students at 
a time, circular in form, well heated and lighted, is located near 
this barn and gives first class advantages for stock judging and 
animal husbandry. 

Other Buildings: Creamery, stables, barns, sheep and swine 
houses, seed houses, etc., sufficient for the requirements of the 
farm, are conveniently grouped near the College Campus. 

MARGARET HALL. 

A commodious and inviting building has been opened for the 
young women in the College. It is well designed for its purpose, 
built of brick, roofed with slate and is architecturally pleasing. It 
ocupies one of the most sightly locations on the campus, giving 
the most pleasing outlook to its occupants. It is provided with 
steam heat, electric lights, ample parlors, bath rooms and the 
most improved modern conveniences. It is neatly and tastefully 
furnished throughout. The Department of Domestic Economy 
also is located in the building and open to all young women of the 
College. Rooms will be assigned to new students in the order of 
their application. The young women are under the direction of 
an efficient dean of women. 

THE COLLEGE GROUNDS. 

The College domain includes about 840 acres. Of this about 
125 acres are set apart for college grounds. These occupy the 
high land of the southwest part of the farm, and include the 
campus, shrubbery, plantations, young forestry plantations, the 
flower borders and gardens, with the beginnings of a botanical 
garden, and the surroundings of the professors' dwellings. Gravel 
drives, cement and gravel walks, lead to all parts of the grounds 
and to the various buildings, and the true principles of landscape 
gardening have been so faithfully observed in the gardening and 
in the location of buildings and drives as to make of the entire 
Campus a large and beautiful park. The view of the surrounding 
country from the upper stories of the large buildings is one of 
wide extent and great beauty. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

CLASSIFICATION AND GRADING. 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY AND DEGREES. 

POST-GRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY AND ADVANCED 

DEGREES. 



28 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 



ADMISSION TO ACADEMIC YEAR. 

YEAR BEGINS SEPTEMBER 1, 1903. 

Candidates for admission to the first term of the Academic 
Year will be required to present satisfactory evidence of profici- 
ency in geography, arithmetic, United States history, human 
physiology, algebra to simple equations, orthography, reading and 
grammar. They will also be required to present further satis- 
factory evidence of efficient preparation such as will enable them 
successfully to enter the Freshman Year on completion of the 
year of Academic work. When an examination in grammar is 
required it will cover the following subjects: The eight parts of 
speech, the classification of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and 
adverbs, the declension of nouns and pronouns, the comparison 
of adjectives and adverbs, and the rules of spelling that apply in 
grammatical inflection. For further information see sample 
examination questions in Preparatory Grammar, page 33. Exam- 
inations will be held on the first and second days of the school 
year. 

ADMISSION TO SECOND TERM OF ACADEMIC YEAR. 

TERM BEGINS JANUARY 19, 1904. 

Students seeking admission to the second term of the Aca- 
demic Year will need to meet the requirements for admission to 
the first term and in addition thereto, pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion in the studies of that term. In lieu of examinations in 
history and drawing, standings of approved high schools will be 
accepted. No student assigned to the algebra of the first term 
will be allowed to take plane geometry. Graduates of schools 
included in either list of "Accredited Schools" will be accepted 
on trial without examination. 

The examination in algebra will include addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, division, factoring, highest common factor, lowest 
common multiple, fractions, simple equations containing one or 
more unknown quantities, problems involving equations of the 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 29 

first degree, and the discussion of such equations. The work in 
algebra should be of a grade equal to that of Wentworth's New 
School or Well's Essentials of Algebra. 

The examination in English will cover the entire field of 
grammar, except prosody. In this examination much will depend 
on the candidate's ability to analyze a passage of good modern 
prose, and to punctuate his paper correctly. In analyzing he 
should be prepared to treat phrases and clauses as units, and to 
state the exact function of conjunctive words. He should show 
a ready and accurate knowledge of the structure of the prose 
sentence and the relations of its various parts to one another. 
For further information, see the sample examination questions in 
Advanced Grammar, page 33. 

Many students will find it exceedingly desirable to begin 
their work in college in this term. Those who have had consider- 
able algebra in the preparatory school should review its funda- 
mental principles and become acquainted with their application 
in the wider and more difficult field of college work, and those 
who have had experience in plane geometry can to advantage 
supplement such study by a review of some standard text and a 
thorough drill in the original geometric propositions. The classes 
in these studies established at the beginning of the spring term 
furnish an excellent opportunity for students to prepare them- 
selves thoroughly for entering upon collegiate work at the open- 
ing of the next school year. 

In like manner, students who have completed grammar and 
have had a high school course in rhetoric have an opportunity in 
this term to review the principles of style and correct whatever 
errors they still make in expressing their thoughts. Without a 
thorough grounding in the principles of style and a considerable 
degree of accuracy in choosirg words and constructing sentences, 
also in planning and developing paragraphs, it is practically im- 
possible for a student to do creditable work in Freshman English. 
The majority of those who fail in English, fail because they are 
not fully prepared to do the work they attempt. In many instances 
the cause of failure is that the student has not been trained to 
apply the principles he has recited; properly directed practice in 
composition is far more important than the mere memorizing 
of rules and definitions. To begin work in this term would 
prepare many for a better standing throughout their course than 
would otherwise be possible. 



30 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN YEAR. 

YEAR BEGINS SEPTEMBER 1, 1903. 

The requirements for admission to the Veterinary course are 
fully specified in the write-up of the Veterinary Course. 

The requirements for all courses other than Veterinary 
Science include either graduation from a High School belonging 
to the list of accredited schools prepared by the Committee on 
College Entrance Requirements appointed by the State Teachers' 
Association, or else approved standings in the studies of the 
Academic Year and the studies necessary for entrance to the 
Academic Year. All students, however, must stand examination 
in English. 

For all Engineering Courses, beginning with the fall term 
1904, all students will be required to present one year's work in 
either French or German. This may consist of either one full 
High School year of five recitations per week or the course in 
French or German given in the Academic Year. Students who 
are not able to meet the entrance requirement in French or 
German, and who are otherwise satisfactorily prepared to enter 
the college, may be conditioned in this subject and make it up 
after entering college. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN MATHEMATICS. 

The examination in plane geometry will be upon the text 
used by the student. He should be prepared to demonstrate orig- 
inal exercises. 

The examination in algebra will cover the following subjects: 
Fundamental operations, including examples involving the use of 
literal, fractional and negative exponents; parentheses occurring 
in terms and factors; factoring; highest common factor and 
lowest common multiple; fractions; equations of the first degree 
involving one or more unknown quantities and problems leading 

to such equations; discussion of the forms — ' — » —, etc.; inequal- 
ities; involution and evolution of algebraic monomials and poly- 
nomials, including the extraction of the higher roots; radicals, 
including the fundamental operations, rationalization, imaginary 
quantities, binomial surds and the solution of equations contain- 
ing radicals; pure and affected quadratics; solution of quadratics 
by factoring; problems involving quadratics; equations solved 
like quadratics; simultaneous quadratic equations, and theory of 
quadratics. Students who have thoroughly mastered these sub- 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 31 

jects in Wentworth's New School Algebra, Well's Essentials of 
Algebra or text books of an equal grade and who have carefully 
reviewed them preparatory to taking up advanced work, ought 
readily to pass the required examination. 

An idea of the quality of work demanded can be gained from 
the sample examination questions which follow: 

1. From (x— y)mn — {a — b) (*+y)- 8 — 5* 2 subtract {2b-\-^a) 
( *-\-y ) -* — ( m ~\-5 ) x-—y?nn. 

2. Multiply— 8a s b—*cr (x— y)-± (m+n)c by 7a*b- z c (x—y) 7 
( m—n ) c . 

3. Resolve 36a 2 c 2 — 8U 2 c 2 — I6a 2 d 2 +36b 2 d 2 into 4 prime factors. 

4. Find the highest common factor of Sax 4 — 2ax 3 — 2ax 2 — 2ax — 
Sa and 6ax*— Uax 3 -\-2ax 2 +2ax+8a. 

5. Find the sum of the following and reduce the result to simp- 
lest form: 

2(1—3*) 1—2* 2 

+ 

(1+*) (1+9*) (1+*) (1+4*) 1+4* 

Aab a — 3b — 3c 

6. Divide 1 -\ by 2— 







a 2 -\-b 2 — c 


2 


2ab a — b- 


-c 


7. 


Solve 
* — 

4 


the equation: 
1 1 (x— 5 

8(4 


u 


\—2x \ x— 9 


7 




5 ) 2 


8 






r 

mx -\ — = 


•• 

1 






8. 


Given 


\ y 

nx -\ = 

t y 




► find * and y. 








1 

J 







9. The fore-wheel of a carriage makes 5 revolutions more than 
the hind-wheel in going 50 yards, and if the circumference of the fore- 
wheel were increased by one-tenth, and the circumference of the hind- 
wheel by one-fifth, the former would make 7 revolutions more than 
the latter in going 198 feet. What is the circumference of each wheel? 

10. Expand (— 4a 2 *— 3 — y 2 )- 2 . 

11. Find the cube root of 10* 3 +12* 5 — 1— 3* 8 — 6* 3 — 12**+*° + 
3*+6* 7 — 10* 6 . 



12. Find the sum of T/Mam+e^ ^i§ a m-*b*, \/2 a ±™+* and 

6 

6v/4<z 2 ni. 



32 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



13. Divide laH^aHc by ad-{/ad s c 3 

14. Find the cube n 



. ( a la 
>0t ° f sV 8 

15. Find the square root of the binomial surd, (a-\-b) 2 — 4 (a — b) 



l/ad. 



16. Divide r/48— W— 12 by — V— 6. 

__ 91 

17. Solve the equation: ^/ox-\-i/ox-\-13 



^3*4-13. 

18. A man traveled by coach 6 miles, and returned on foot at a 
rate of 5 miles an hour less than that of the coach. He was fifty min- 
utes longer in returning than in going. What was the rate of the 

/— / \ o *— p» 

( x 2 y 2 +2Sxy— 480=0 

19. Solve the equations: ] 

( 2x+y=ll. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN ENGLISH. 

The applicant should show thorough preparation in English, 
including grammar and elementary rhetoric, and not over-looking 
spelling, reading, and punctuation. A student who spells poorly 
will be conditioned in English courses until he is able to spell 
with comparative accuracy. The applicant should understand 
the words in current use in good modern prose, and should be 
able to read aloud with that ease and fluency that betoken a 
correct understanding of what he reads. His knowledge of 
grammar should enable him to classify words according to their 
grammatical properties, to give their inflections and to identify 
each form, to analyze in detail sentences of modern prose, and, 
above all, to construct sentences correctly. He should have given 
sufficient study to punctuation to enable him to use the marks 
correctly in his own compositions. His knowledge of rhetoric 
is best tested, not by his readiness to give definitions, but rather 
by his ability to apply his knowledge of rhetorical principles in 
his own speech and composition. His speech should be free from 
gross errors and awkward constructions, and he should be able to 
write with a fair degree, not only of correctness, but also of ease. 
For such training, more depends upon the teacher than upon the 
text-book, but the method pursued in a book like Scott and Den- 
ney's "Composition-Rhetoric" is likely in general to produce the 
best results. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 33 

An idea of the extent and nature of the ground covered may- 
be gained from the following set of sample examination questions 
in English: 

PREPARATORY GRAMMAR. 

(For admission to the first term of the Academic Year). 

I. (a) Decline I, it, lady, dog, Charles. 

(b) Compare noisy, ill, remarkable. 

(c) Write the principal parts of go, see, ride, sleep, try. 

II. Define (a) proper noun, (b) personal pronoun, (c) des- 
criptive adjective, (d) intransitive verb, (e) passive voice, (f) 
subordinate conjunction. 

III. Name the different kinds of nouns, of adjectives, and 
of pronouns, and give an example of each. 

IV. In the following sentence tell what part of speech each 
word is: "The deacon did not stop to speak to her, but after a 
moment's thought placed the precious wallet under the pillows." 

V. Analyze this sentence: "This act was followed by anoth- 
er moment's reflection, and as the old man turned, his son stood 
before him in the doorway." 

VI. Parse the italicized words: "These are not my books. 
I think they must belong to some of the boys. What boys have 
been here since I left?" 

ADVANCED GRAMMAR. 

(For admission to the second term of the Academic Year). 

I. Conjugate strike in the present perfect, past, and past 
perfect tenses of the indicative mood, passive voice. 

II. Define (a) personal pronoun, (b) demonstrative adjec- 
tive, (c) abstract noun, (d) impersonal verb, (e) active voice, (f) 
indirect object, (g) attribute complement. 

III. (a) Name the principal uses of the subjunctive mood, 
(b) How does it differ in form from the indicative? 

IV. (a) Decline martyr, baby, ox. 

(b) Compare lazy, industrious, ill. 

(c) Give the principal parts of throw, lie, lay, sit, set, 
and ride. 

V. Distinguish between shall and will in (a) the first person, 
(b) the third person. 

VI. Parse the italicized words: "No man ever loved more 
than Stanley to look facts in the face, and to know the exact and 
certain truth. 'Let us be firmly persuaded,'' he wrote, 'that error 

3 



34 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

is more easily eradicated by establishing truth, and darkness 
most permanently displaced by diffusing light'." 

VII. In the following sentence state what each phrase mod- 
ifies and how: "There is no clearer illustration of this love of 
light than in his eager and impassioned insistence that the 
revision of the translation of the Bible should have the help of all 
the best scholarship of England, in whatever creed or church it 
might be found." Also point out all the modifiers of insistence. 

VIII. In the following sentence state the office of each clause, 
and point out the subject, verb, and complement of each: "It is a 
duty which the people, by the constitution itself, have imposed on 
the state legislatures, and which they might have left to be per- 
formed elsewhere, if they had seen fit." 

IX. Analyze this sentence: "Culture seeks to do away with 
classes; to make the best that has been thought and known in the 
world current everywhere; to make all men live in an atmosphere 
of sweetness and light, where they may use ideas as it uses them 
itself, freely, — nourished and not bound by them." 

X. Punctuate: "I would not perplex a young mind with 
punctuation as a system or with nice questions between semi- 
colons and colons but every one should at an early age be taught 
the difference between the period and the comma and the principal 
functions of each every one should be taught too the great prin- 
ciple that a point serves as a guide to the construction and 
through the construction to the meaning of the sentence." 

ELEMENTARY RHETORIC. 

(For admission to the first term of the Freshman Year). 

I. In the following sentence, (a) state the exact grammatical 
office of each phrase; (b) parse the italicized words; (c) account 
for the punctuation: "During the first half century of our national 
life we seemed to have succeeded in an extraordinary degree in 
approaching our ideal, in organizing a nation for counsel and 
co-operation, and in moving forward with cordial unison and 
with confident and buoyant step toward the accomplishment of 
tasks and duties upon which all were agreed." 

II. Correct the following sentences, and explain the correc- 
tion: 

1. John writes as well or better than Henry. 

2. Tom was laying on the floor when I come in. 

3. He haint got nothing to worry about. 

4. If I was him I would of done it long ago. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 35 

III. Discuss fully and carefully four of the following topics: 

1. The practical value of rhetoric. 

2. The essential qualities of the paragraph. 

3. The respective advantages of the short sentence, the long 
sentence, and the periodic sentence. 

4. Define purity, propriety, and precision, and state why 
each should be observed. 

5. The topic sentence; what it is, its position, its value. 

IV. Write an essay of from 250 to 350 words on two of the 
following topics: 

1. My reasons for desiring a college education. 

2. A striking contrast — persons, places, or things. 

3. A trying experience. 

4. A visit to . 

NOTE — These essays are considered an important part of the examination. 
They will be graded mainly on diction, sentence structure and connection, and 
paragraphing. Good penmanship, neatness of manuscript, and correct spelling 
and punctuation are also important. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN HISTORY. 

For admission to the work of the First Semester of the 
Academic Year the student is expected to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in United States history. Standings from the graded 
schools will be accepted in lieu of the examination. To pursue 
successfully the work of the First Semester in the Academic year 
it is expected that the student will have had some drill in the 
study of historical subjects. This will be determined by the 
nature of the school work already done. 

For admission to the work in history for the Second Semester 
of the Academic Year, standings in general history from 
accredited high-schools are accepted in lieu of an examination on 
the work in history for the First Semester. Such credit is condi- 
tional upon the maintenance of a satisfactory grade of scholarship 
in the advanced work assigned. Should failure result, any por- 
tion of the credit allowed may be cancelled or review without 
credit be required. 

Since the text-book in the Second Semester of the Academic 
Year is largely supplemented by library and written work and 
other important class exercises, this course must be taken at the 
College except for those students who have had the equivalent of 
history as arranged in a fully accredited high-school course. 

Pupils from any of the Fully or Partially Accredited schools 
not graduates may receive credit in the Academic Year, for the 
work done at the high school, but such credit is conditioned upon 



36 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the maintenance of a satisfactory grade of scholarship in the ad- 
vanced work assigned. 

Students from high-schools not accredited, wno desire credits 
for the Academic Year will be expected to pass a satisfactory- 
examination in General History to the Reformation. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN FREE-HAND DRAWING. 

For admission to the First term of the Academic Year no 
previous work in drawing is required. 

The standings of students from High Schools giving courses 
in free-hand drawing may be accepted in lieu of the work in free- 
hand drawing for the first term of the Academic Year. 

The work in free-hand drawing of the second term of the 
Academic Year (for engineering students only) will be required 
of all entering engineering students who cannot demonstrate pro- 
ficiency in sketching parts of machines and a knowledge of the 
principles of projection and of dimensioning, and facility in plain 
free-hand lettering. 

EXAMINATION AT HOME. 

The heads of the English, History and Mathematical depart- 
ments will cheerfully unite with principals of schools in arranging 
for such examinations in grammar, rhetoric, history, algebra and 
geometry, as will admit students to our Freshman Class. Candi- 
dates can arrange also to have questions for examination sent to 
County Superintendents or other school officers who are willing 
to conduct the examination. The papers will be forwarded to 
the heads of the English, History, and Mathematical departments, 
who will mark the same and notify the applicant of the record 
received. 

The attention of applicants for admission is particularly 
called to this arrangement, by which all their entrance examina- 
tions can be taken at a convenient place near home. 

ADMISSION ON DIPLOMA. 

SCHOOLS FULLY ACCREDITED. 

The following list of accredited schools has been prepared 
by the Committee on College Entrance Requirements appointed 
by the State Teachers' Association. The attention of secondary 
schools is called to the fact that beginning with this year each 
school to be accredited must have at least three teachers devot- 
ing their time exclusively to High School work. A full and com- 
plete list of the rules governing accrediting of High Schools 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 37 

and the statement of how a High School may become accredited 
may be found on pages 129 to 133 of the High School Manual 
issued by the last State Teachers' Association. Copies of this 
book may be had free of charge on application to State Superin- 
tendent R. C. Barrett, Des Moines. 

The graduates of fully accredited schools will be admitted 
to the studies of the Freshman Year, except English, without 
examination. 

In English all new students must take an examination. This 
examination will consist of two parts: First, a preliminary test 
of the student's facility and accuracy of expression as indicated 
by an essay on a familiar topic. Those who pass this test will 
be assigned to English III on trial for one week, which consti- 
tutes the second part of the examination. During this week each 
student will write a series of exercises and essays designed to 
test his general preparation in English, including Spelling, Punc- 
tuation, Grammar and Elementary Rhetoric. In these tests 
memorized rules and definitions, mere theoretical knowledge, will 
count for little; readiness in applying rules and principles is the 
essential thing. At the end of these tests only those students 
who have shown sufficient preparation will be permitted to go on. 

Students thus admitted will take review work in algebra dur- 
ing the first ten days of the term. All subjects up to and includ- 
ing quadratics will be treated and the ability of the student to 
demonstrate principles and solve examples and problems will be 
tested. Satisfactory examination will be accepted in lieu of this 
review. 

At the close of this review T students will be assigned to such 
work in English and mathematics as the professors in charge of 
these branches shall consider them fitted to undertake. Credits 
in these branches will be given only as students complete the 
respective courses set forth in the detailed statement of the work 
of these departments. A review of one week in plane geometry 
will be given at the beginning of the second term and assignments 
in geometry made in accordance therewith. 

SCHOOLS FULLY ACCREDITED. 

Ackley, Anamosa, 

Adel, Atlantic, 

Albia, Bedford, 

Algona, Belmond, 

Ames, Boone, 



38 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Brooklyn, 

Burlington, 

Capital Park, Des Moines, 

Carroll, 

Cedar Falls, 

Cedar Rapids, 

Centerville, 

Charles City, 

Cherokee, 

Clarinda, 

Clinton, 

Columbus Junction, 

Corning, 

Corydon, 

Council Bluffs,/ 

Cresco, 

Davenport, 

Decorah, 

Denison, 

Des Moines, E., 

Des Moines, W., 

Des Moines, N., 

Dexter, 

Dubuque, 

Eagle Grove, 

Eldora, 

Emmetsburg, 

Estherville, 

Fairfield, 

Forest City, 

Fort Dodge, 

Fort Madison, 

Geneseo, 111., 

Glenwood, 

Greene, 

Greenfield, 

Grinnell, 

Guthrie County, 

Hamburg, 

Hampton, 

Harlan, 

Humboldt, 



Indianola, 

Iowa City, 

Iowa Falls, 

Jefferson, 

Keokuk, 

Knoxville, 

Lake City, 

Lamoni, 

Le Mars, 

Leon, 

Manchester, 

Manning, 

Maquoketa, 

Marengo, 

Marion, 

Marshalltown, 

McGregor, 

Missouri Valley, 

Moline, 111., 

Montezuma, 

Monticello, 

Mount Ayr, 

Mount Pleasant, 

Muscatine, 

Nashua, 

Nevada, 

New Hampton, 

Newton, 

Odebolt, 

Oelwein, 

Onawa, 

Orange City, 

Osage, 

Osceola, 

Oskaloosa, 

Ottumwa, 

Perry, 

Postville, 

Red Oak, 

Reinbeck, 

Rockford, 

Rock Rapids, 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 



39 



Sanborn, 

Sheldon, 

Shenandoah, 

Sibley, 

Sigourney, 

Sioux City, 

Sioux Falls, S. D., 

Spencer, 

St. Mary's, Iowa City, 

Storm Lake, 

Stuart, 

Taylorville Tp., 

Taylorville, 111., 

Tipton, 

Traer, 

Villisca, 

Vinton, 

Wapello, 

Washington, 

Waterloo, E., 

Waterloo, W., 

Waukon, 

Waverly, 

Webster City, 

West Union, 



Wilton, 

Williamsburg, 

Cedar Valley Seminary, Osage, 

Charles City College, 

Decorah Institute, 

Denison Normal School, 

Dexter Normal College, 

Epworth Seminary, 

Howe's Academy, Mt. Pleasant, 

Iowa City Academy, 

Jewell Lutheran Col., Jewell, 

Lincoln Academy, Lincoln, Neb., 

Michigan Military Academy, 

Orchard Lake, Mich., 
Mt. St. Joseph's Acad., Dubuque, 
Sac City Institute, 
St. Agatha's Sem., Iowa City, 
St. Frances Acad., Council Bluffs, 
Washington Academy, 
Whittier College, Salem, 
Wilton German-English College, 
Woodbine Normal School, 
Calhoun County Normal School, 
Hawarden Normal School. 



SCHOOLS NOT FULLY ACCREDITED. 

The following list of schools not fully accredited has been 
prepared by the Committee of the State Teachers' Association. 
Graduates of these schools will be admitted to the review work of 
the second term of the Academic Year on presentation of a dip- 
loma showing that the candidate has completed one of the long 
courses. To be entitled to credit in any study of the second term 
of the Academic Year the student must present to the professor 
in charge satisfactory evidence of proficiency in that study. 

Adair, Anita, 

Adel, Audubon, 



Albia, 

Algona, 

Allerton, 

Alton, 

Ames, 



Bloomfield, 

Boone, 

Brighton, 

Britt, 

Capital Park, Des Moines, 



40 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Carroll, 

Cedar Rapids, 

Centerville, 

Chariton, 

Charles City, 

Charter Oak, 

Clarion, 

Clearfield, 

Clear Lake, 

Colfax, 

Coon Rapids, 

Columbus Junction, 

Correctionville, 

Corydon, 

Council Bluffs, 

Creston, 

Davenport, 

Decorah, 

DeWitt, 

Des Moines, N., 

Dubuque, 

Dysart, 

Eldon, 

Eldora, 

Elkader, 

Emmetsburg, 

Estherville, 

Fairfield, 

Farmington, 

Fayette, 

Fonda, 

Fontanelle, 

Forest City, 

Fort Dodge, 

Fort Madison, 

Garner, 

Geneseo, 111., 

Glenwood, 

Glidden, 

Grand Junction, 

Greene, 

Greenfield, 



Grinnell, 

Grundy Center, 

Guthrie Center, 

Guthrie County, 

Hamburg, 

Hampton, 

Hartley, 

Holstein, 

Hubbard, 

Humboldt, 

Ida Grove, 

Independence, 

Jefferson, 

Keosauqua, 

Kingsley, 

Lake Mills, 

Lake City, 

Lime Springs, 

Lyons, 

Manchester, 

Mapleton, 

Marengo, 

Marion, 

Mason City, 

Mechanicsville, 

Milton, 

Morning Sun, 

Moultpn, 

Mount Ayr, 

Muscatine, 

Nashua, 

Neola, 

New Sharon, 

North English, 

Northwood, 

Oak Park, Des Moines, 

Odebolt, 

Oskaloosa, 

Ottumwa, 

Pella, 

Perry, 

Reinbeck, 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 41 

Riceville, Taylorville Tp., 

Richland, Taylorville, 111., 

Rolfe, Tipton, 

Sac City, Traer, 

Shelby, Waterloo, E., 

Shell Rock, Waterloo, W., 

Shenandoah, Waukon, 

Sibley, West Liberty, 

Sioux City, Wilton, 

Sioux Rapids, Winfleld, 

Springdale, Dexter Normal School, 

Springville, Sac City Institute, 

State Center, St. Ansgar Seminary, 

Storm Lake, Wilton German-English College, 

Tama City, 

HOW TO ENTER THE COLLEGE. 

Persons who desire to enter the College as new students 
should comply with the following directions: 

1. Study carefully and comply with the "Requirements of 
Admission." Then write to the President, asking for a "Card 
of Inquiry." 

2. On receiving this card, write an answer opposite each 
question, and mail the card to the President. If the answers you 
give accord with the "Requirements for Admission," a card of 
introduction will be sent you, which simply entitles you to admis- 
sion on passing the examination, or giving the required proof of 
proficiency. 

3. Information regarding board and rooms can be secured 
by writing J. F. Cavell, Custodian, Ames, Iowa. 

4. When you arrive at the opening of the term present the 
"Card of Introduction" at the President's office. You will there 
be given a card of directions. 

5. Students who do not bring certificates of proficiency in 
the studies required such as meet the approval of the examining 
committee will need to be examined here. When all the examin- 
ations are completed, and your standings therein are marked on 
your examination card, return it to the President. If you have 
passed the studies required you will then sign the Students' 
Record Book and Contract and secure a card of classification, 
which certifies your admission to the College and assignment to 
class work. 



42 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Your name will be entered at once upon the official class 
lists and will be included in the roll call the following day. You 
will be expected to attend thereafter every recitation of the term. 

STUDENTS' EXPENSES AND EQUIPMENT. 

No charge is made for tuition to Iowa students. To those 
who come from outside the state $24.00 tuition per year is 
charged. 

The current expenses of students during the year are as 
follows : 

Every student entering College shall, before being classified, 
pay a — 

Janitor fee of $5.00 

In Margaret Hall and Creamery — 

Lighting, heating and incidentals, per week $ .55 

Room rent, per term 3.00 

* Hospital fee, per term 2.50 

In the Cottages — 

Fuel, lighting and incidentals, per week $ .40 

Room rent, per term 3.00 

* Hospital fee, per term 2.50 

As security for the payment of bills, students living in the 

College buildings are required to deposit with the Treas- 
urer $10.00 

This deposit will be returned on final settlement at the close 
of term. 

All bills for each month must, without fail, be settled at the 
Treasurer's office by the second Saturday of the month following. 

Students using laboratories in the various departments of 
the College are required to pay a laboratory fee at the beginning 
of each term to cover expenses of breakage, etc., thus incurred 
and the professors in charge require the Treasurer's receipt for 
such fee before admitting the students to laboratory practice. 

For amounts of such fees see department courses. 

Students purchasing military uniforms will deposit $5.00 with 
the merchant tailor at the time measures are taken, paying the 
remainder on delivery. 

For heating, lighting, cleaning and care of the College build- 
ings students pay less than the items actually cost the institu- 
tion. Injury to College property, of whatever sort, is charged to 
the author, when known; otherwise to the section or to the entire 
body of students, as may seem just in the given case. 

*See terms of Hospital Department, page 43. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 43 

Students who board in any of the College buildings furnish 
their own bedding, and all furniture for their rooms, excepting 
bedsteads, washstands, tables and wardrobes. 

Students are earnestly advised to make their rooms comfort- 
able and cheerful. Male students in the two lower classes, not 
physically disabled, are required by law to take the military drill 
and purchase uniforms therefor. "Physical disability" must be 
certified to by the College Physician, on examination. 

Text books and stationery may be purchased at the College 
Book Store, at about twenty-five per cent below the average 
retail price. 

COLLEGE HOSPITAL. 

The actual sanitary condition of the College is excellent. The 
buildings are situated on high ground with good natural drainage. 
The water supply is exceptionally pure and abundant. 

The sewer system and sewage disposal plant are the best 
that modern sanitary engineering can devise. Nevertheless, in 
this, as in other like institutions, whose students are drawn 
from a wide territory, various diseases are brought here by the 
students themselves. In order to control epidemics and properly 
care for other cases of illness or injury, a neat and commodious 
hospital building is provided. This building is heated by fur- 
naces, lighted by gas, and has perfect sanitary plumbing. This 
hospital is under the charge of the College Physician assisted by 
a professional nurse and a competent housekeeper. 

The expenses of the hospital are defrayed from a fund accru- 
ing from hospital fees paid by students. 

The hospital fee insures to the payer thereof medical attend- 
ance, nursing and medicine in illness or accident and consultation 
and medicine for minor ailments, in accordance with the regula- 
tions published below. 

The privileges of the hospital are also extended to students 
not rooming in the college buildings, provided, 1st, that no calls 
shall be made by the Physician at their residence, and 2nd, that 
the usual hospital fee is made within the first ten days of the 
term. The hospital has proved to be a great blessing to the 
students and the insurance is placed at actual cost. 

The following regulations apply to the privileges of the hos- 
pital : 

1st. The hospital fee for the term is fixed at $2.50, and is 
required of all students living in College buildings. 



44 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

2nd. Students entering the hospital shall be charged $3 per 
week for board, fires and lights. No other charges on these 
accounts shall be made by the College during the time the student 
is in the hospital. 

3rd. For any time in excess of three consecutive weeks per 
term spent in the hospital an additional charge above that men- 
tioned, shall be made of $4.00 per week. 

4th. In case a special nurse or physician is employed the 
expense shall be borne by the particular patient. The selection 
of such physician or nurse to be approved by the College Physi- 
cian. 

5th. Students not making the hospital deposit will be admit- 
ted to all the privileges of the hospital allowed students making 
the deposit upon the basis of a charge of $10.00 per week. 

6th. The College Physician is authorized to exclude from the 
college dormitories and recitation rooms any person afflicted 
with a contagious disease. 

7th. The privileges of the hospital shall not be extended to 
cases of small-pox. 

8th. The College assumes no responsibility whatever and 
the hospital fee of $2.50 does not provide for medical attendance, 
nurses, medicine or other expenses incurred in treating or caring 
for students afflicted with small-pox. 

9th. The President and College Physician shall require of 
students entering College a certificate of a reputable physician 
showing a successful vaccination. 

10th. The charges named are based upon the probable actual 
cost of medical attendance and hospital service and the fund 
created will be carefully devoted to those purposes. The College 
can not assume any liability beyond the extent of the fund so 
created. 

MANUAL LABOR. 

SHOP LABORATORY AND FIELD PRACTICE. 

The following regulations in regard to manual labor have 
been adopted by the Board of Trustees: 

1. The manual labor of students is divided into two kinds, 
viz.: Uninstructive labor, which shall be paid for in money, and 
instructive labor, which shall be compensated by the instruction 
given and the skill acquired. 

2. Uninstructed labor shall comprise all the operations in 
the workshop, the garden, upon the farm and elsewhere, in which 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 45 

the work done accrues to the benefit of the College, and not to 
that of the student. Instructive labor shall embrace all those 
operations in the workshop, museum, laboratories, veterinary- 
hospital, experimental kitchen, upon the farm, garden and exper- 
imental stations, in which the sole purpose is the acquisition of 
knowledge and skill. 

3. Students shall engage in instructive labor in the presence 
and under the instruction of the professor in charge according 
to the statement made in each of the courses of study. 

The compensated labor furnished by the Divisions of Agricul- 
ture, Veterinary Medicine and of Engineering, is given by each to 
its own students, and is eagerly sought. The "details" of com- 
pensated labor supplied by the needs of the various departments 
are given to the most faithful and meritorious students in each 
department. Uninstructive labor is paid for according to its 
value to the College, but no student should expect to pay the 
main part of his expenses by labor while here. The College 
cannot furnish the work, and even if it could, the student's time 
is chiefly needed for study. Still, many worthy and industrious 
students pay a considerable part of their expenses by labor, over 
$4,000 being paid out by the College thus each year to students 
and post-graduate assistants. 

GOVERNMENT. 

The relations of our college buildings, and the nature of the 
exercises, complicated as they are, by laboratory work, shop 
practice and labor, make order, punctuality and systematic effort 
indispensable. This institution, therefore, offers no inducement 
to the idler or self-indulgent. All who are too independent to 
submit to needful authority, or too reckless to accept wholesome 
restraint, are not advised to come. The discipline of the College 
is confined mainly to sending away promptly those who prove on 
fair trial to be of the said class. 

The use of tobacco by students on the college premises is 
forbidden. Those who are already so addicted to its use that 
they cannot cheerfully submit to this regulation are advised not 
to come. Of course the use of intoxicating beverages and of 
profane and obscene language is forbidden. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

Officers and students gather daily in the chapel at 11:45 a. m., 
for public worship. On Sunday morning at 10:45 a discourse is 
given in the chapel by a clergyman invited for the occasion. The 



46 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

object of these services is to emphasize and enforce the principles 
of morality and of the Christian religion. Being a state institu- 
tion we give the utmost freedom to all creeds and forms of belief, 
avoiding the controversies of sectarianism. 

The faculty requires on Sundays such conduct and decorum 
in and about the college buildings as befit the observance of the 
Sabbath. 

RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATIONS. 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 
of the College are voluntary organizations, composed of students 
and members of the faculty. The membership is large. The 
Sunday school, Bible classes and prayer meetings are under their 
direction, and are well attended and profitable. This voluntary 
Christian influence in the College is strong and healthful, 

LITERARY SOCIETIES, 

Seven literary societies hold their meetings each Friday 
evening, a time kept free from other college functions. These 
societies supplement the literary work of the College, and besides 
provide a training in appearing before an audience such as every 
college graduate needs, a training that is not secured in the 
class room. Every student is advised to join one of these socie- 
ties. The societies collectively constitute the Oratorical Associa- 
tion, whose duty it is to provide for four general programs each 
year; an oratorical contest in the fall term, a declamatory contest 
in the spring term, and a joint program at the beginning of each 
term. Six of the societies constitute the I. S. C. Debating League, 
an organization which arranges for an inter-society debate each 
term and an annual inter-collegiate debate with the Iowa State 
Normal School. The inter-society debate calls out twenty-four 
debaters each term, four from each society, two of whom main- 
tain the affirmative and two the negative of a given question, 
against opposing teams from other societies. 

THE MOORE PRIZE FUND. 

To Mr. S. L. Moore, of Boone, the College is indebted this 
year for a prize fund of one hundred dollars, which has been 
divided equally between the Oratorical Association and the 
Debating League. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 47 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Courses of study leading to the following degrees are offered: 

1. The course in Agriculture — Department of Agronomy. 

2. The course in Agriculture — Department of Dairying. 

3. The course in Agriculture — Department of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

4. The course in Agriculture — Department of Horticulture. 
Each of the foregoing is a four years' course leading to the 

degree of Bachelor of Scientific Agriculture, (B. S. A.). 

5. The course in Veterinary Science, of four years, leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, (D. V. M.). 

6. The course in Mechanical Engineering, of four years, 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, 
(B. M. E.) 

7. The course in Civil Engineering, of four years leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Civil Engineering, (B. C. E.) 

8. The course in Electrical Engineering, of four years leads 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, 
(B. Sc. in E. E.) 

9. The course in Mining Engineering, of four years leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering, 
(B. Sc. in Mn. E.) 

10. The course in Science as Related to the Industries, of 
four years leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. Sc.) 

11. The course in General and Domestic Science, for women, 
of four years, leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. Sc). 
Women may take any other course desired. 

For the short courses in Agriculture and Dairying certificates 
properly indicating the completion of certain studies will be 
given. 

For the short courses in Mining and Ceramics, certificates 
will be given. 

SPECIAL LINES OF STUDY. 

Students taking special work in any of the College courses 
must be at least twenty years of age, must give good and suffi- 
cient reason for desiring such special classification and must 
furnish satisfactory evidence that they are thoroughly prepared 
to pursue the work chosen. Permission to take such special 
course and the subjects included therein must receive the 
approval of the President of the College and the Dean or Head 
of the Department in which the student seeks enrollment. 



48 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

(1) Back Studies. — Students shall be classified in back 
studies in all cases where such studies are taught. Any excep- 
tion to this rule must be for good and sufficient reasons approved 
by the President of the College and the Dean or Head of Depart- 
ment in which the student is enrolled. 

(2) Number of Hours. — No student shall be allowed to 
classify in more hours than are specified in the catalog for the 
term of the course taken unless he has an exceptionally high 
record in his previous college work and gives satisfactory reason 
for desiring to take the additional study. The taking of such 
additional work is subject to approval by the President of the 
College and the Dean or Head of the Department in which the 
student is enrolled. 

(3) Conflicts. — Students shall not classify in conflicting 
studies without the approval of the President of the College and 
the Deans or Heads of departments of the conflicting studies in 
which the student wishes to enroll. 

GRADUATING THESES. 

The subjects of theses shall be selected under direction of the 
professor in whose department they are written, and submitted to 
the Thesis Committee, with signed approval of the Professor, on 
or before the first Monday in October. 

It is expected that each thesis shall represent an amount of 
work equivalent to at least one exercise per week through the 
Senior Year; that it shall show the result of the student's per- 
sonal study or investigation and be throughout original in matter 
and treatment so far as the nature of the subject will permit; 
that it shall be prepared under the supervision of the professor 
in charge, the student making frequent reports of progress and 
having an outline of matter ready for approval by the first week 
of the last term. 

The thesis, ready for examination and marking, with its 
specific title and the written approval of the professor in charge, 
shall be presented to the Thesis Committee at a date fixed by the 
committee during the four weeks preceding the Commencement 
Day. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Graduate and undergraduate students of other colleges will 
be admitted and granted such credits as their work will justify. 
Work of recognized merit that has been taken at colleges or 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 49 

universities of good rank and standing will be credited for an 
equivalent amount of work so far as it applies in any of the 
courses offered at this college. Students taking up work in this 
way will consult the heads of departments to ascertain the credits 
to be allowed; these credits may at the option of the head of the 
department be conditioned on satisfactory work during the stu- 
dent's first term in College. 

POST GRADUATE COURSES. 

The advanced degrees which are conferred by the faculty of 
this college are as follows: 

1. The degree of Master of Scientific Agriculture (M. S. A.) 
is open to Bachelors of Scientific Agriculture who are graduates 
of this college or other colleges offering equivalent courses of 
study. 

2. The degree of Master of Science (M. S.) is open to Bach- 
elors of Science who are graduates of this College or other col- 
leges offering equivalent courses. 

3. Professional Degrees in Engineering. (See below.) 

REGULATION FOR MASTER'S DEGREES. 

1. The opportunity of resident study after graduation is a 
privilege granted only upon recommendation of the President 
and the Professors in charge of the departments in which the 
studies are to be pursued. 

2. Between the baccalaureate degree and the master's 
degree there shall intervene not less than two years, of which 
the candidate shall devote not less than one year (the second 
preferred) to resident study at this College. 

3. Two lines of work shall be selected, designated as major 
and minor studies, the former to be given two-thirds and the 
latter one-third of the time. The major study shall be research 
work, the results of which shall be incorporated in a thesis. 

4. The major and minor studies shall be so selected as to 
support and strengthen each other. 

5. No undergraduate study shall be selected as a major 
study. 

6. The candidate shall have a reacting knowledge of French 
or German. 

7. Applications for graduate work shall be filed with the 
President not later than October first. Such application shall 
contain a detailed outline of the major and minor studies, ap- 



50 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

proved by the heads of the departments in which the work is to 
he taken. 

8. The candidate for the master's degree shall apply in 
writing for examinations not later than May 1, and such examin- 
ation shall be given not later than May 15th. 

9. Graduates of other institutions desiring to become can- 
didates for Post-Graduate degrees in this institution shall be 
required to show to the Committee on Post-Graduate study evi- 
dence of undergraduate work equivalent to the corresponding 
course in this institution, and if any deficiency appear in the 
subjects elected for Post-Graduate work to make up such de- 
ficiency. 

ADVANCED DEGREES IN ENGINEERING. 

The several departments of the Division of Engineering 
confer the professional degrees as follows: 

In Mechanical Engineering, the degree of Mechanical En- 
gineer, (M. E.). 

In Civil Engineering, the degree of Civil Engineer, (C. E.). 

In Electrical Engineering, the degree of Electrical Engineer, 
(E. E.). 

In Mining Engineering, the degree of Mining Engineer, (E. 
M.). 

The above degrees are conferred subject to the following 
regulations: 

Applications for professional engineering degrees will be 
received from graduates of the engineering departments of this 
College or from graduates in engineering from other colleges 
offering equivalent courses of study in engineering. 

To be entitled to the professional degree, the applicant there- 
for shall have devoted not less than one year to resident study 
along lines satisfactory to the engineering faculty, shall have been 
engaged for not less than one year in a responsible professional 
position, and shall present a satisfactory thesis, or he shall have 
been engaged for not less than five years in a responsible pro- 
fessional position and shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

In this connection a responsible professional position means 
practical engineering experience, requiring the exercise of skill 
or executive ability in designing or construction work. Refer- 
ences or personal knowledge of the facts will be required by the 
engineering faculty. 

Further information as to the lines of work open to graduate 
students can be found under the several courses of study describ- 
ed elsewhere. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



AGRONOMY. 

DAIRYING. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

HORTICULTURE. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 



52 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



EDGAR W. STANTON, M. Sc, 

Acting President. 

JAMES WILSON, M. S. A., 

Lecturer. 

CHARLES F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Director of Experiment Station and Dean of Agriculture. 

**J. L. BUDD, M. H., 

Professor Emeritus in Horticulture. 

JULIUS BUEL WEEMS, Ph. D., 

Chemist of the Experiment Station. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry and Vice Director of Experiment Station. 

GEORGE LEWIS McKAY, 

Professor of Dairying. 

PERRY G. HOLDEN, M. S., B. Pd., 

Professor of Agronomy and Vice Dean of Agriculture. 

HOMER C. PRICE, M. S. A., 

Professor of Horticulture and Forestry. 

W. H. STEVENSON, A. B., 

Soils. 

FRANK W. BOUSKA, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 

ARTHUR T. ERWIN, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

F. R. MARSHALL, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

W. H. OLIN, M. Sc, 

Assistant in Farm Crops. 

C. LARSON, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Dairying. 

E. C. MYERS, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 53 

EDWARD E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

ALFRED ATKINSON, 

Assistant in Field Experiments. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M Sc, 

Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

GEN. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Military Science. 

LOUIS HERMAN PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, M. A., 

Professor of French and German. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc., 

Professor of Physics. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Professor of Zoology. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. 0., 

Professor of Elocution and Associate in English. 

JOHN J. REPP, V. M. D., 

Frofessor of Pathology and Therapeutics. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 

Professor of History and Philosophy. 

JOHN H. McNEALL, V. M. D., 
Dean of Veterinary Science and Professor of Anatomy and Surgery. 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Sanitary Science. 

TALBOT LENNOX, 

Instructor in Dairy Machinery. 

EZRA C. POTTER, 

Instructor in Wood Work. 



54 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 

Instructor in Latin and English. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

E. B. TUTTLE, B. Sc. in E. E., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS HELEN G. REED, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Dl, 
Instructor in English. 

MISS GRACE NORTON, 

Instructor in German. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. S., 

Instructor in Zoology. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 

Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE E. STEVENS, B. L., 
Assistant Librarian. 



THE DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 

CHARLES F. CURTISS, DEAN. 
PERRY G. HOLDEN, VICE DEAN. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The instruction in agriculture is divided into the following 
departments: 

I. Department of Agronomy. 
II. Department of Dairying. 

III. Department of Animal Husbandry. 

IV. Department of Horticulture. 

V. Department of Agricultural Chemistry. 
The courses in these several departments unite in making a 
foundation for the student upon which he can build a successful 
career as a farmer, or develop into a specialist in the many 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 55 

possible lines that are branches of the farming industry. The 
studies pursued in each department are equally recognized as 
being necessary to fully equip the student for the highest order 
of work in any division of agriculture, and the only difference 
between the shorter and the longer courses is due to the degree 
to which the student wishes to specialize and develop himself 
for a single line of work. The farm as it is commonly conducted 
is a union of many divisions of industry and the shorter course 
confines itself to laying a foundation that will secure success in 
ali of these, while the longer course seeks to direct the student 
into that line which will call forth and centralize his special 
ability and at the same time enable him to meet the variety of 
conditions that under all circumstances surround a successful 
life. 

Past experience with the courses of these departments shows 
that they have met with more than the usual success in attaining 
their objects; as the shorter course has been productive of many 
successful farmers, and the longer course has been unusually 
successful in developing better farmers and more capable men in 
practical life and also in securing for our graduates prominent 
positions in the agricultural faculties of other colleges. 

In practical agriculture, a field unsurpassed by any other 
college in the United States is open to the students. The nation- 
al government gives to the college about thirty-five thousand dol- 
lars annually for original experimentation and instruction in 
agriculture and the sciences related to the industries. This 
enables the college authorities to make the fields and the barns 
veritable laboratories of extensive and most practical investiga- 
tion and observation. The range is from the soil that produces, 
through all of its natural characteristics, to whatever is grown 
in agriculture from germ to finish. A live stock room is set 
apart in Agricultural Hall in connection with one of the best 
recitation rooms, into which live animals are brought in the 
presence of the teacher and the class for careful study and inti- 
mate knowledge, and a commodious, well-lighted stock judging 
pavilion has been constructed especially for this work. An ex- 
perimental barn with the recent and most approved methods of 
stalls, feeding and ventilation, is devoted exclusively to the 
original work of animal husbandry. This work ranges over all 
the questions of breeding and maturing domestic animals. 

The agricultural school is designed to teach the sciences 
that underlie practical agriculture, and sufficient English liter- 



56 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ature, mathematics, history, and other supplementary studies 
to sustain both scientific and practical agriculture and to de- 
velop the agricultural students to the intellectual level of the 
educated in any profession. Special attention is given to the 
improved methods in all of the various operations of farming, 
farm building, using tools and machinery, and management of 
all kinds of stock and crops. The instruction of this department 
embraces principles and practice of agriculture. 

The farm consists of 800 acres of rolling prairies, bottom, 
and woodland, and is stocked with good representatives of six 
breeds of horses, six breeds of cattle, seven breeds of sheep, and 
six breeds of hogs. These animals are used in class illustration 
and for the various experiments in breeding and feeding for 
milk, meat, wool, growth and maintenance, conducted by the 
Experiment Station as a department of the College. All the crops 
of the farm are grown for some educational purpose; all the 
animals are fed by rule and system, and the result of their 
management reported upon, and used in class work. Labor is 
not compulsory, but students in the agricultural course are given 
work that is educational and parallel with their studies. Some 
students pay for their board by work in the mornings and even- 
ings. Under direction of the professor in charge, students as- 
sist in conducting experiments in lines related to their studies. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY. 

PERRY G. HOLDEN, PROFESSOR; W. H. STEVENSON, SOILS. 
W. H. OLIN, ASSISTANT IN FARM CROPS; ALFRED ATKINSON, ASSIST- 
ANT IN FIELD EXPERIMENTS. 

Agronomy is the science of the field and its crops, and treats 
of (a) Farm Management; the application of economic business 
methods to farm practices, (b) Farm Crops; their production 
and improvement, (c) Soils; their fertility, cultivation, and 
improvement, (d) Farm Mechanics; the tools, machinery, fences 
and drains of the farm. 

Course I. — Farm Crops-, Corn and Grain Judging. — Corn judg- 
ing includes: 1. The practical work of judging representative 
samples of the varieties of corn with the use of the score card 
and standards of perfection. 2. The study of the physical char- 
acteristics of seed ears; the selection of seed for special pur- 
poses; methods of harvesting, sorting, storing, testing and. 
planting seed corn. 3. A series of recitations covering the 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 57 

adaptations of varieties of corn to conditions of soil and climate, 
preparation of seed bed, cultivation, methods of harvesting, cost 
of production, and uses of crop. 

Grain grading includes: 1. Practice in grading samples of 
corn, wheat, and other grain crops according to inspectors' and 
buyers' standards. 2. A series of recitations upon the extent 
and cost of production, and the distribution of these crops. 

1st Year. 1st Semester. and Mr. Olin. 

Course II. — Farm Mechanics', Farm Buildings; Farm and 
Field Machinery. — The location, arrangement of farm buildings, 
their construction and cost, especially of barns, granaries, silos, 
etc. The different kinds of fences, their cost, construction, effi- 
ciency for different purposes, and desirability. The setting and 
testing of fence posts, gate posts, and the operating of fence build- 
ing machines. The course in field machinery includes a study of 
the tools and machinery for field operations. Plows, harrows, and 
weeders; seeders, drills, corn and potato planters; mowers, rakes, 
binders, huskers, wagons, etc. Their construction, efficiency, draft 
and durability. Class and laboratory work consists in setting up, 
adjusting and testing the different farm machines and imple- 
ments of the field. 1st Year. 2nd Semester. 

Course III. — Farm Crops; Crop Production. — This term's 
work consists in a study of the field crops of the farm. It em- 
braces the study of the principles underlying their propagation, 
germination, and growth. 

Time and methods of planting, conditions favorable and un- 
favorable to plant growth; effects of thick and thin seeding, 
depth of planting; study of root systems of our different soils. 

Noxious Weeds: How to destroy them through different 
methods of plowing, cultivation, rotation of crops, etc. 

Injurious Insects: Time of plowing, methods of cultivation, 
and kinds of rotation as means of lessening effects of. 

Fungous Diseases: Methods of treating farm seeds as a 
means of controlling the loss from these diseases. 

Shrinkage of corn and other grains. 

Data on crop production. 

Harvesting and storing, economic use and value of the 
various crops of the farm. 

This work will be supplemented by laboratory and field work 
applying the principles brought out in the class room work. 

Required. Agronomy I. 2nd Year. 1st Semester. Mr. Olin. 
and 



58 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Cottkse IV. — Farm Mechanics; Farm Power Machinery, and 
Drains. — The object of this work is to familiarize the student 
with the principles of the different machines used on the farm; 
and includes a study of gasoline engines, wind mills, pumps, feed 
cutters, grinders, corn shellers, fanning mills, and other ma- 
chines. Attention is given to the handling of these machines 
to secure the greatest efficiency. Care of machinery, housing, 
repairing, etc. Under drainage is studied, location of drains, 
and a study of the different problems arising in the laying out of 
drains and drainage systems. A study of the legal questions 
arising in the establishing of drainage districts. The levelling, 
including the determining of grades, making of profile maps, and 
a complete record of the drains of the farm. Digging, laying of 
tile, filling of ditches, and subsequent care of drains. The cost, 
construction, and efficiency of tile drains; sewers for the disposal 
of waste water from farm buildings. Class and laboratory work. 

Those students who are fitted for the work will have an 
opportunity during the summer vacation to earn from $40.00 to 
$60.00 per month, travelling in the interests of harvester and 
other manufacturing concerns. 

Required. Agronomy II. 2nd Year. 2nd Semester. 

Couese V. — Soils; Soil Physics. — This course comprises a 
study of the origin, formation and classification of soils; soil 
moisture and methods for conserving it; soil temperature, and 
conditions influencing it; soil texture as affecting the supply of 
heat, moisture and plant food; surface tension, capillarity, 
osmosis, and diffusion as affecting soil conditions; the effect upon 
the soil and the crop of plowing, harrowing, cultivating, rolling 
and cropping; washing of soils and methods of preventing the 
same; preparation of seed beds, cultivation and drainage as 
affecting moisture, temperature, root development, and the supply 
of available plant food. 

The work of the class room is designed to give the student 
an opportunity to study the different methods of handling soils 
and the effects of these methods upon the moisture, temperature, 
texture, and productiveness of the soil. 

In addition to the work of the class room several hours each 
week throughout the term will be devoted to laboratory work. 

Special attention will be given to the mechanical analysis of 
soils by the centrifugal method employed by the Bureau of Soils, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. The work will also comprise 
the determination of the specific gravity, apparent specific grav- 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 59 

ity, volume, weight, porosity, water holding capacity, and capil- 
lary power of various soils; also a study of the effect of mulches 
on the evaporation of water from the soil and the physical effects 
upon the soil of different systems of rotation and of continuous 
cropping. 3rd Year. 1st Semester. Professor Stevenson. 

Course VI. — Soils; Fertility. — Maintanence of Fertility, Fer- 
tilizers and Rotation. The influence of commercial fertilizers, 
barn yard manure, and green manuring upon the quality and 
yield of various crops; the effect of different crops upon the 
fertility of the soil and upon succeeding crops. 

Different systems of rotations and the effect upon the pro- 
duction of the soil of various methods of farm management. Also 
a study of the storing, preserving and application of barn yard 
manure. 

This work will be supplemented by a laboratory study of 
manures and fertilizers; their composition and agricultural value. 
Pot and field experiments will be conducted to show the influence 
of fertilizers, applied to the soil in different quantities and at 
different times, upon the quality and yield of various crops. 
Leguminous crops as fertilizers and their place in farm rotation. 
A study will be made of special types of soil in different sections 
of Iowa, such as the clay and peat soils of Iowa with special 
reference to the best methods of handling and cropping these soils. 
Required. Agronomy V. Chemistry III. 3rd Year. 2nd Sem- 
ester. Professor Stevenson. 

Course VII. — Research Work. — The student may choose any 
one of the following lines of work: 

(a) Special Work in Soil Physics. — This course is offered 
for students who desire to pursue advanced work in the study of 
the physical properties of soils. 

Apparatus for the determination, by electrical methods, of 
the temperature, moisture and soluble salt content of various 
determinations under actual field conditions. 

The organic content of soils will be determined by the process 
used by the Bureau of Soils, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

When possible field experiments will be conducted to show 
the effect upon soil conditions of different depths of plowing, 
harrowing, cultivating, rolling, fallowing, and different methods 
of preparation of seed beds. 

A study will be made of the physical properties of peculiar 
types of soil found in the state and of methods for redeeming 
them and rendering them productive. Professor Stevenson. 



60 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

(b) Special Problems Regarding the Fertility of the Soil. — 
This course is designed for students who desire to continue their 
investigation of the soil. Problems of special interest regarding 
the fertility and productiveness of particular types or classes of 
soils will be studied. The nature and quantity of the elements 
of fertility in the soils investigated will be determined and pot 
cultures and plot experiments will be conducted to show the effect 
upon the growth and yield of various crops, of different fertilizers 
added to the soil. 

This work will be supplemented by assigned readings. The 
student will study the results published by authorities on these 
lines of investigation and will also present in written form the 
results of his own investigations and experiments. Professor 
Stevenson. 

(c) Research Work; the Improvement of Farm Crops; meth- 
ods of selection and hybridization; effects of inbreeding and 
crossing; plans for breeding fields; methods of taking records 
and recording pedigrees; methods for testing vitality and purity 
of seeds; a study of the organs of reproduction with special 
regard to their arrangement for cross or close pollination; the 
study of the results of experiments in crossing and selection and 
other means of improvement. Mr. Olin. 

(d) Special Crops. — Research work with special crops under 
the outline of grain, forage, root, fibre, and other crops produced 
for special purposes. This course is arranged so as to permit 
the student to specialize and pursue independent investigations 
with those crops in which he is particularly interested. The 
recitations will cover the distribution, development of varieties, 
details of methods of production, special methods of preparation 
or manufacture, and uses. The laboratory work will consist of 
a series of special experiments in the green houses or fields, ar- 
ranged for each student. These experiments will be planned, 
carried out, and the results presented in acceptable form by the 
student. This work will be supplemented by a study of previous 
experiments and the preparation of bibliography of such work. 
2nd Semester, 3rd Year, and 1st Semester, 4th Year. Mr. Olin 
and . 

Course VIII. — Farm Management. — This consists of a study 
of the different systems of extensive and mixed farming; the 
application of business methods to farm operations; comparison 
and study of methods pursued by our most successful farmers; 
division of the farm into fields and crop management; circum- 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 61 

stances that influence agricultural practices — soil, climate, ma- 
chinery, land, tenure, etc., markets, profits, and losses; executive 
and commercial problems on large and small farms, — management 
of farm help; amount of fencing, number and character of live 
stock as affecting the economic management of the farm; relation 
of farming to other occupations; qualifications and requirements 
for the farm manager. 1st Semester. 4th Year. Professor Hol- 
den. 

Course X. — History of Agriculture. — A study of the develop- 
ment of the agricultural methods and practices of those nations 
which have contributed most to the progress of agriculture; the 
influences of these methods and practices upon the agriculture of 
the present day. A comparison of agricultural methods of other 
countries with those of our own country and the influence of 
different practices upon the social conditions of the people. 

POST-GRADUATE WORK IN AGRONOMY. 

I. Farm Crops. 

1. Breeding of Special Forage Crops. 

2. Breeding of Cereals. 

3. Breeding of Root Crops. 

4. Study of the economic methods of growing and handling 
our various Farm Crops. 

5. Caring for, storing, testing, and marketing our farm 
seeds. 

II. Farm Mechanics. 

1. Investigation of the draft of different farm implements; 
effect of good and bad adjustment of different tools upon the 
power required for efficient work. 

2. Study of Silos. 

3. Experiments with different kinds of cultivators for differ- 
ent purposes. 

4. Study of different kinds of fences with special reference 
to their efficiency for special purposes. 

5. The study of harvesters and mowers. 

6. Special study in the construction and arrangement of 
barns. 

This work is designed especially for those who wish to fit 
themselves for foremen, superintendents, etc., in connection with 
farm proprietors, manufacturing, and implement concerns. 

III. Soils. 

1. Study of soils fitting for special work in U. S. Bureau of 
Soils, College and State Experiment Station work. 



62 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

The post-graduate work in soils will consist in the study of 
special lines of investigation in soil physics, and soil fertility, 
and soil bacteriology. 

IV. Farm Management. 

1. Special investigation of some of the most serious waste- 
ful practices of the farm; how to remedy them. 

2. Special business methods for special farm conditions. 

3. Special vs. mixed farming. 

4. Investigation of methods practiced by farmers in keeping 
a record of the elements of loss and gain on their farm, biblio- 
graphy to be completed showing resulting losses and remedies 
suggested. 

This work is designed to prepare young men for farm man- 
agers, and superintendents for both large and small farms. There 
is a constant demand for competent men for such positions. 

SHORT COURSE IN CORN JUDGING, 1904. 
January 4 to 16. 

During the winter vacation a two weeks' course in corn 
judging will be given. This course is planned with special 
reference to supplying the great demand for work along this line 
by those who are unable to take advantage of the work in the 
regular College course. A two story corn and stock judging 
pavilion is now being erected for this work. Instruction will be 
given in the methods of selecting, storing, purchasing, testing, 
and preparation of seed corn for planting. Instruction will also be 
given in the methods of cultivation, characteristics, and adapta- 
bility of different varieties to various sections of the state. A 
comparison of the efficiency of all the different makes of planters 
and cultivators will be made. 

Samples of all the leading varieties of corn from the corn 
breeders of this and other states will be on exhibition and will be 
used for corn judging purposes. This immense collection of corn 
representing every county in the state will afford an unusual 
opportunity to compare the different varieties and study their 
characteristics. Premiums amounting to over $2,400.00 will be 
offered for the best corn exhibited by members of the Corn 
Growers' Association and for those doing the best work in corn 
judging. Those wishing to become corn judges, qualified to judge 
corn at country fairs and expositions will have an opportunity at 
this corn school to prepare themselves for the work. An exam- 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 63 

ination will be held at the close of the school and corn judging 
certificates will be issued by the Corn Growers' Association to 
those who prove themselves proficient. To partially cover the 
expense of additional instructors and facilities for judging and 
demonstration a tuition fee of $2.00 will be charged but one fee 
will cover the instruction in both stock and grain judging. 

The work during this course will be so arranged that the 
students' time will be divided equally between corn and stock 
judging. 

PREMIUMS FOR CORN. 

COOK TROPHY — $400. 

Mr. A. E. Cook of Odebolt, Iowa, will present a trophy costing 
not less than $400 to be competed for annually and awarded to 
the person exhibiting the Grand Champion sweepstake ear of corn. 

WHITING TROPHY — $400. 

The Hon. W. C. Whiting, World's Pair Commissioner of 
Agriculture for Iowa offers a $400 trophy for the Grand Champion 
sample of 10 ears of corn. 

WALLACE'S FARMER TROPHY $200. 

The Wallace's Farmer offers a $200 challenge trophy for the 
Grand Champion sample of 10 ears of corn exhibited by any 
Farmers' Club, Farmers' Institute or Corn Club. 

HOMESTEAD PREMIUM — $100. 

The Iowa Homestead has placed at the disposal of the Iowa 
Corn Growers' Association $100 in gold to be awarded for the 
best corn and the best corn judging work. 

farmers' tribune trophy — $100. 

The Farmers' Tribune offers a $100 trophy for the person 
winning first place in the corn judging contest. 

IOWA SEED COMPANY SPECIAL PREMIUMS — $50. 

The Iowa Seed Company will give two cash specials; one for 
the best sample of Iowa Silver Mine, $25; one for the best sample 
of Golden West, $25; exhibited in any of the other classes. 

These, together with the many other premiums offered, 
amount to over $2,400.00. The contest will be held at the Agri- 
cultural College annually during the two weeks' short course in 
corn and stock judging. 

For further information regarding rules governing the con- 
test address the Agronomy Department of the Agricultural Col- 
lege. 



G4 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF DAIRYING. 

GEO. L. M'KAY, PROFESSOR. 

F. W. BOUSKA, INSTRUCTOR IN DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY. 

C. LARSON AND DE LA SHELDON, INSTRUCTORS. 

The magnitude and rapidly changing conditions of the dairy- 
industry render a higher degree of skill and intelligence in this 
field imperative. No branch of education has proven more pop- 
ular or productive of better results than the instruction furnished 
in the economical production of a superior class of dairy products. 
From the fertile farming lands of the Central West annually come 
one hundred or more young men to be trained in special work in 
our dairy school. That these young men become leaders wher- 
ever they take up work is shown by the responsible positions they 
are holding at high salaries in dairy communities everywhere, 
and the many prizes won in state and national conventions. Even 
the city milk supply business is calling for scientifically trained 
men who thoroughly understand the essential regulations for 
proper sanitation and cleanliness, pasteurization and sterilization. 

In order to meet the demands of such instruction the Dairy 
School provides two sixteen weeks courses; one for butter and one 
for cheese making, beginning with the regular college terms, and 
a one year course beginning with the college year. Also a two 
weeks course in sarters and cream ripening, especially designed 
for experienced makers, commencing January 4, 1904. 

The College Creamery is in operation the year round. The 
work is conducted on a practical and commercial scale as well as 
for scientific investigation and instruction. The product made 
invariably brings the highest quotations and has attained an 
enviable reputation in the markets of the United States and 
England. 

The facilities for teaching dairying in a thoroughly practical 
and scientific manner are unexcelled. The building is exception- 
ally well equipped for practical work as well as scientific instruc- 
tion and investigation. It is more than a "dairy building" as the 
term is generally understood. It is a practical working creamery 
and cheese factory, in operation every work day in the year. 
During the summer season from five to ten thousand pounds of 
milk are taken in daily and manufactured into butter and cheese; 
during the winter somewhat less. The milk is purchased from 
farmers living in the vicinity of the College and they are paid for 
it according to its merits, based not only on butter fat determined 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 65 

by the Babcock test, but upon inspection of its cleanliness, free- 
dom from all taints, objectionable odors and other general qual- 
ities. A bacteriological laboratory, forms facilities for instruction 
and investigation in this important feature of the subject. 

The student becomes familiar with everything connected with 
the management of a commercial creamery, and meets every 
problem that is likely to confront him in his afterwork. All 
leading types of separators are used in the dairy building and the 
most approved machinery is used throughout by the students. 

The work done in dairying by the students in the four years 
course in agriculture is outlined in the course of study. They 
not only become familiar with the work in the creamery, the 
cheese factory and the private dairy, but study the underlying 
principles of the whole subject in the broadest sense. The College 
dairy herd, consisting of thirty or forty cows, regularly in milk, 
affords opportunity for the study of dairy as well as creamery 
problems. These cows are milked and cared for mainly by student 
help under the direction of instructors. 

During the latter part of the senior year those students who 
have shown themselves capable, are permitted to spend a portion 
of their time in the laboratory in original work, and meritorious 
work of this kind is reported in the bulletins of the Experiment 
Station. 

The courses in dairying were established for the benefit of 
those who were already engaged in the business, either on the 
farm or in the creamery or factory, and for this reason a very 
large portion of the time is devoted to practical work in the dairy 
building. 

Students in these courses are taught everything connected 
with practical work, from weighing the milk brought in by the 
different patrons and testing the same, to running the engine, 
scrubbing the floors and shipping the butter. The aim is to teach 
not only how to do all the work incident to a business of this 
kind, but also why, — the reason, — the work should be done in the 
manner taught. The studies, other than dairying proper, which 
appear in the courses outlined are such as are necessary to a 
correct understanding of the principles involved, and all students 
entering these courses are required to attend them regularly. 

Students in all of the Dairy and Creamery work are required 
to provide themselves with white suits, keep them clean and in 
good order. 



66 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ONE YEAR COURSE IN DAIRYING. 

The one year course in dairying is designed to meet the wants 
of those who wish to acquire an intimate knowledge of practical 
dairy methods and the underlying principles as well as to the 
sciences related thereto. This course runs through one college 
year beginning in January and ending in December. Students 
completing this course will receive certificates, but the right is 
reserved to withhold such certificates until satisfactory evidence 
is furnished of ability to successfully manage commercial cream- 
eries or other large dairy establishments for at least one year. 
No other certificates will be given for any course in dairying 
except to students entitled to a diploma for the four years' course 
in Agriculture. (See note at bottom of page). Following is the 
course of study pursued: 

FIRST TERM OF NINETEEN WEEKS. 

Dairy Practice in butter making, 6 days per week. — (Dairy I.) 

Buttermaking, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy II.) 

Milk Testing, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy III.) 

Dairy Machinery, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy IV.) 

Book-keeping, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy V.) 

Bacteriology of milk, 20 Lectures. — (Dairy VI.) 

Feeding and Judging Dairy Stock, 30 Lectures. — (Dairy VII.) 

SECOND TERM OF SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Preparation of Ice Cream and Ices, 10 Lectures. — (Dairy 
XXI.) 

Dairy Practice, 6 days per week. — (Dairy I.) 
Cheesemaking, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy VIII.) 
Technology of Milk, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy IX.) 
Feeding Dairy Stock, 20 Lectures.— (Dairy X.) 
Dairy Chemistry, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy XI.) 
Scoring Butter and Cheese, 10 Lectures. — (Dairy XII.) 

THE SUMMER SCHOOL IN DAIRYING. 

While we earnestly advise those who expect to work in dairy 
lines, either on the farm or in the creamery or factory to take 
the one year course in Dairying as outlined above we realize that 
there are many who for various reasons are unable to do this. 
Believing that a state institution should offer every possible en- 

Note— Students taking the one year course in dairying must be qualified 
for work in the collegiate department and will be expected to furnish satis- 
factory evidence of a thorough knowledge of all branches taught in the 
common school. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 67 

couragement to those who desire to fit themselves to do their 
chosen work in the best manner, a Summer School in Dairying is 
thrown open to students. This school begins in January and 
continues sixteen weeks. The same studies are pursued in this 
as in the One Year Course: 

Dairy Practice, 6 half days per week. — (Dairy I.) 

Buttermaking, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy II.) 

Milk Testing, 16 Lectures.— (Dairy III.) 

Dairy Machinery, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy IV.) 

Book-keeping, 16 Lectures. — (Dairy V.) 

Bacteriology of Milk, 20 Lectures. — (Dairy VI.) 

Feeding and Judging Dairy Stock, 32 Lectures. — (Dairy VII.) 

TWO WEEKS COURSE IN DAIRYING. 

The prominent rank attained by students of the Iowa Dairy 
School in state and national contests has led to a demand for 
special instrucion. The short course will begin January 4, 1904, 
and continue for two weeks; the subjects that will receive special 
attention during this time are: (Preparation of commercial 
and natural starters, ripening of cream, judging and scoring of 
cream and butter and how best to treat the hand separator 
cream). This latter subject was a special feature of our last 
year's course. Hand separator cream will be shipped in to the 
College Creamery during this course and treated in different ways 
with a view of making the best possible quality of butter from a 
given quality of cream. (No one but experienced butermakers 
are advised to take this course. The fees for this course will be 
$12.00, which is intended to cover expenses involved in securing 
extra instructors, and material for the course). 

The scope of the work given in the Department of Dairying 
is set forth in the following statements: 

Cotjese I. — Dairy Practice. — This includes from five to seven 
hours of practical work in the creamery room during the first 
term of the One Year Course. This includes buttermaking with 
Mr. Sheldon and laboratory work in milk testing with Mr. Larson. 
In the second term of the Year Course it includes cheesemaking 
with Professor McKay and Pasteurization with Mr. Bouska. 

Course II. — Milk and Its Products. — This includes instruction 
in the composition of milk and dairy products, the theory of 
centrifugal separation and the construction of the various kinds 
of separators. Special attention is given to the effect of varying 
conditions of the milk on separation. It includes a consideration 



68 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

of the principles of cream ripening, churning and the preparation 
of butter for the market. Mr. Bouska. 

Couese III. — Milk Testing. — This includes a thorough study 
of the Babcock Test for dairy products with special instructions 
for overcoming the difficulties from varying conditions. The 
tests for determining acidity of cream and milk, and the use of 
the lactometer for detecting adulterations are included, also 
composite sampling and testing of individual cows. Mr. Larson. 

Couese IV. — Dairy Machinery. — (Mechanical Engineering 
XL.) This embraces instruction for firing boilers by the most 
economical methods, the construction and operation of engines 
and pumps, and the placing of machinery and shafting. Mr. 
Lennox of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. 

Couese V. — Book-Keeping. — This course is designed to give 
the students the best form of book-keeping for the business 
of the factory. Mr. . 

Couese VI. — Bacteriology of Milk. — This course consists of 
lectures on the nature of bacteria, distribution and the conditions 
necessary for their growth. The effects produced by various 
bacteria commonly found in milk are shown by lectures and 
demonstrations. The methods of handling which cause contamin- 
ation of milk are considered in detail. That the quality of dairy 
products depends mostly upon the fermentations which have 
taken place in these preparations is shown with detailed attention 
to the use and value of starters in buttermaking and cheesemak- 
ing. The principles of cream ripening and pasteurization are 
also included. Mr. Bouska. 

Couese VII. — Breeding and Judging Dairy Stock. — In this 
course the judging of dairy stock with the score card and by 
comparison is made a leading feature, while the lectures relate 
mostly to the principles, methods and practice of breeding dairy 
stock and their management. Professor W. J. Kennedy and Mr. 
Marshall. 

Couese VIII. — Cheesemaking. — In the winter term this con- 
sists of ten lectures on Chedder cheese, including a study of the 
kinds of cheese demanded by different markets. In the Second 
Term of the One Year Course, the same work is taken up as in the 
winter term, but with the addition of six lectures on fancy brands 
of cheese, including Limburger, Brick, Swiss, Roquefort, Sage, 
Stilton, Pine, Apple, and Gouda, etc. Professor McKay. 

Couese IX. — Scoring Butter and Cheese. — These lectures are 
designed to give the student a correct idea of the standard market 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 69 

requirements for dairy products. Butter and cheese are examin- 
ed and scored by the students and their judgment compared with 
that of the instructor. Professor G. L. McKay. 

Course X. — Feeding Dairy Stock. — Second Term, One Year 
Course in Dairying. Special attention is given in this course to 
the principles of feeding animals for the most economical pro- 
duction with a study of the composition and use of various feed- 
ing materials, and the feeding of dairy cows, including the in- 
fluence of various feeding stuffs on the quantity, quality and 
composition of milk, butter and cheese. Mr. Marshall. 

Course XI. — Dairy Chemistry. — (Chemistry XXVIII.) The 
chemical composition of dairy products is considered in a general 
manner. The alkali test both in theory and practice is given in 
order that it may be used by the student. The adulteration of 
butter, cheese and milk as it relates to the dairy industry is also 
taken up in the lectures. As a whole, the work is intended to 
furnish a foundation for the student which he can use as a basis 
for future study. Prof. . 

Course XII. — Farm Dairying. — This is a required study for 
all four year agricultural students, first term Sophomore year; 
optional study in course for women. Two recitations per week, 
and five laboratory demonstrations. The class work takes up 
composition and secretion of milk, separation of cream by grav- 
ity, and centrifugal separators; the Babcock test for determina- 
tion of fat, ripening of cream and churning and packing of but- 
ter. The latter part of the term will be given to lectures on the 
bacteriology of milk with reference to the general applications 
of the subject, such as contamination of milk, relation of bacterial 
changes to butter and cheese; milk relation of bacterial changes 
to butter and cheese, etc. As this course has been planned to 
give the students a knowledge of dairying in general, only five 
laboratory periods will be involved. The working of the Babcock 
test for determination of fat, detecting adulteration in milk, test- 
ing for acidity in cream, and buttermaking as is practiced in the 
best modern dairies will be taken up and demonstrated in the 
laboratory work. Mr. Larson, Mr. Bouska. 

Course XIII. — Milk Testing. — This includes a thorough study 
of the Babcock test for dairy products with special instructions 
for overcoming the difficulties resulting from varying conditions. 
The tests (Mann & Farrington's) for determining acidity of 
cream and milk and the use of the lactometer for detecting adul- 
terations are included, also composite sampling and testing of 



70 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

individual cows, and the influence of different preservatives upon 
the milk. Mr. Larson. 

Course XIV. — Buttermaking . — This course comprises a de- 
tailed and thorough study of the different methods of procedure 
involved in the manufacture of butter, with the various designs 
of dairy utensils. Two recitations and one laboratory per week. 
The class work takes up the secretion and composition of milk, 
principles of separation of cream by gravity and centrifugal sep- 
arators; effects of different degrees of acidity of cream upon the 
quality of butter, and the principles of churning, packing and 
marketing butter. The laboratory periods are devoted to prac- 
tical work in the creamery laboratory. The effects of varying 
conidtions upon the quality of butter; how to operate the leading 
types of separators and churns, and how to prepare tubs and 
butter so as to procure the best keeping qualities of it, are sub- 
jects which will receive special attention in the laboratory. Pro- 
fessor McKay. 

Course XV. — Cheesemaking. — This course involves two reci- 
tations and one labratory period per week. The class work takes 
up the importance of the quality and composition of milk, as it 
relates to the manufacture of different kinds of cheese (Cheddar 
cheese, Limburger, Brick, Swiss, Roquefort, Sage, Stilton, Pine 
Apple and Gouda) and principles involved in the cutting, heating, 
milling, salting and pressing the curd. The influence of organ- 
ized and unorganized ferments in the making and curing of 
cheese. The ventilation and construction of cheese curing rooms 
are also taken up. The labratory work includes the making of 
'these different kinds of cheese mentioned above. Professor 
McKay. 

Course XVI. — Technology of Milk. — This course is intended 
to give to the students a general knowledge of the different ways 
in which milk and its products are utilized, outside of the scope 
ordinarily considered under dairying. Such subjects as prepara* 
tion of condensed milk, certified, modified and hygienic milk. It 
also includes a study of the preparation and utilization of milk 
sugar and casein. Mr. Larson. 

Course XVII. — Dairy Bacteriology. — This course consists of 
two lectures and one laboratory period per week. It includes a 
study of the distribution and conditions necessary for the growth 
of bacteria. The effects produced by the various bacteria com- 
monly found in milk, and that the quality of dairy products de- 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 71 

pends mostly upon the fermentations, which have taken place in 
these preparations, is shown with detailed attention to the use 
and value of starters in butter and cheesemaking. The laboratory 
work consists of making quantitative and qualitative bacterial 
analysis of dairy products. Isolating and innoculating different 
species of bacteria into sterile milk and cream, and noticing the 
results. Mr. Bouska. 

Course XVIII. — Scoring Butter and Cheese. — These lectures 
are designed to give the students a correct idea of the standard 
market requirements for dairy products. Butter and cheese are 
examined and scored by the students and their judgments com- 
pared with that of the instructor. Professor G. L. McKay. 

Course XIX. — Research Work. — This course has been 
planned for the advanced students in dairying. It consists in 
looking up on recent work done in different dairy subjects by the 
different Experiment Stations; also to read and study the differ- 
ent books on dairying written by the different authors on assigned 
topics. Prof. G. L. McKay. 

Course XX. — Factory Management. — This course, together 
with the knowledge the student already has, is intended to qualify 
a student to superintend or manage any large factory or dairy 
establishment. The course consists of one lecture per week, and 
work in the creamery equivalent to two laboratory periods per 
week. The class work will include such subjects as the economy 
in the construction of creameries, drainage and ventilation of fac- 
tories, how to treat the skim milk and other by-products in order 
to get the best economic results. It is advisable for the student 
to put in the laboratory work during vacation or some other time 
when the work can be done during consecutive days. 

Course XXI. — Preparation of Ice Cream and Ices. — This 
course consists of lectures and laboratory work both. They are 
combined in such a way as to give the student the best under- 
standing possible concerning the preparation of ice cream, sher- 
bets and ices, as made on a private and commercial scale. 

Course XXII. — Thesis. — The work on thesis must be original 
work on some dairy subject. The students should consult the 
professor in charge concerning their subject before or after the 
beginning of the senior year. The bacterial and chemical labora- 
tory facilities in connection with the creamery plant offer special 
inducements to the students for doing original work. Frequently 
arrangements can be made with this department for co-operation 
in working out important subjects and if the work is deemed 



72 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

meritorious, will be published in bulletin form. The thesis work 
must represent time equivalent to a two hours' study during the 
second semester of the senior year. Prof. G. L. McKay. 

GRADUATE COURSE IN DAIRYING. 

This department is especially equipped to offer graduate work 
to advanced students in dairying. In connection with the cream- 
ery, which is in operation the whole year around, there is in the 
same building a well equipped laboratory in dairy chemistry as 
well as in dairy bacteriology. This offers special inducements 
for original work to students in dairying along the following 
lines: 

(a) — Dairy Bacteriology. — In this course the student can 
either pursue work which is valuable chiefly from a scientific 
standpoint, or he can take up the work as it relates to some 
practical subject in the creamery industry. Subjects, as the effect 
of certain species of bacteria in milk, cream and washwater, upon 
the quality of butter; the effect of overripe and unripe cream 
and starters upon the bacterial flora of the same; and the kind 
of bacteria that causes butter to go "off" in flavor; are of peculiar 
interest for investigation to dairymen. Special facilities for this 
kind of work are offered. 

(b) — Dairy Research. — The research laboratory in the cream- 
ery building has recently been equipped with a view of doing 
special work along the line of dairy chemistry. Investigations 
on subjects, as the determination of total overrun; the effects of 
the various amounts of curds, moisture, fat and salt upon the 
quality and keeping quality of butter; the conditions governing 
the incorporation of these components of butter and the varia- 
tion in the composition of milk, butter and butter fat, during 
the different seasons of the year, are made special features of 
this course. 

(c) — Factory Management. — This study embodies the condi- 
tions which are to be considered in order to obtain the greatest 
possible degree of economy in the operation of a large dairy farm 
or some large factory. How to obtain the best quality as well as 
the greatest quantity of the special product manufactured; and 
how to avoid the many leaks so incidental to creamery manage- 
ment are problems that are taken up in this course in a thorough, 
practical and systematic" way. 

(d) — Cheese Making. — In this course we offer advanced work 
in the manufacture of Cheddar cheese as well as in the manu- 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 73 

facture of the different kinds of fancy cheese. The chemical as 
well as the bacterial laboratory are open for research work to 
students pursuing work in this course. The college creamery 
building has rooms and special facilities for the different steps in 
the manufacture and curing of cheese. 

(e) — Milk Production. — Under this heading such subjects as 
the greatest economic production of milk, with special reference 
to the individuality of cows; the effects of certain feeds upon the 
quality of butter and cheese; and the environmental conditions 
affecting the quantity and quality, are included. This work is 
facilitated by reason of having in connection a large herd of 
cows. By the co-operation of the dairy and animal husbandry 
departments, this work can be pursued in a most practical way. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

WILLARD J. KENNEDY, PROFESSOR. 
F. R. MARSHALL, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

, INSTRUCTOR. 

N. C. EEW, GRADUATE ASSISTANT. 

The department of Animal Husbandry stands for all lines of 
work which pertain to the judging, selecting, breeding, feeding, 
development, and care and management of the various breeds 
and classes of domesticated animals. Recognizing the importance 
of the live stock industry to the welfare of the state and, on 
account of the unusual quest from students for instruction along 
this line, nothing within our power has been left undone to make 
the equipment for instruction purposes complete in every detail. 

The herds and flocks were very carefully established at an 
early date. From time to time valuable additions in keeping 
with modern ideas have been made until, at the present time, 
almost every recognized market class of animal and good repre- 
sentatives of all the recognized breeds are available for student 
use. An equipment of this kind places us in a position to do 
work along animal husbandry lines which cannot be accom- 
plished in those institutions where proper specimens of stock 
are not obtainable. We are firmly convinced that there is but 
one way to make a young man a proficient judge of live stock, and 
that is by training his eye. In all of the lecture and laboratory 
work outlined in our courses the work is demonstrated by the 
use of living specimens. 

The offices and lecture rooms of the department are located 
on the first floor of Agricultural Hall. The museum, which con- 



74 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

tains a complete assortment of the various kinds of wools, woolen 
materials, animal by-products, etc., is located on the third floor 
of the same building. 

The judging pavilions are located near the barns. In this 
respect we are most fortunate in having two excellent commod- 
ious judging pavilions. This allows us to divide our classes, 
which have in the past been unusually large, into many sections, 
thus affording an excellent opportunity for individual work. 
These buildings are well lighted and heated, and are arranged in 
every way for convenience and comfort on the part of those who 
take the work. 

An excellent collection of horses representing all the market 
classes and breeds of both light and heavy types is maintained for 
instruction work. Among these are good representatives of the 
Shires, Percherons, Clydesdales, French coachers, Hackneys, 
Standard breds, and the American Saddle horse. Some of the 
horses are imported while the others have been selected with 
much care from the best breeders on the continent. 

Over two hundred head of cattle, representing all the leading 
beef, dual purpose, and dairy breeds are maintained on the farm. 
Complete breeding herds of most of the breeds are kept. A large 
herd of Galloway cows are kept for cross breeding purposes used 
in the production of blue greys. An excellent collection of steers, 
representing the very highest type of a fat steer, and all the 
other grades and classes to be found on our leading markets down 
to the very lowest grades, are always available for class work. 
This affords our students an excellent opportunity to study the 
market demands and to know what constitutes each class, also 
why there is such a wide margin in the prices paid for cattle by 
the packing house man. 

The equipment of the sheep department is especially strong, 
constituting over two hundred head, containing good representa- 
tives of the mutton and wool types and typical specimens of all 
the leading breeds. Eight distinct breeds, which have been care- 
fully selected to represent the type and characteristics of each 
breed both in regard to their mutton form and wool bearing 
qualities, are always available for class room work. In addition 
to the breeding flocks we always have a choice collection of fat 
wethers which afford an excellent opportunity for the student to 
familiarize himself with the highest type of a finished mutton 
sheep. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 75 

In the swine department, representatives of six breeds are 
maintained, including the best American as well as the leading 
British varieties. As in the other departments, the aim in this has 
been to keep in touch with the modern ideas of the leading 
breeders, both in regard to breeding and type of the animals in 
these breeds. At all seasons of the year there is more or less 
feeding of market stock being done on the farm and in connection 
with the Experiment Station, so that excellent material is always 
available for instruction purposes regarding the qualities that 
add to the value of stock for the ordinary market. Having pure 
bred representatives in addition, it is easy to inform the student 
in a practical way on the finer points of color, type, and other 
characteristics that relate to the pure bred classes of stock. 

To further assist in this work, the herd books of the different 
American and foreign registry associations are being constantly 
added to the library. Through these the student is not only 
enabled to inform himself in regard to pedigrees, but he is also 
enabled through them to study the different scales of points which 
the breeders have adopted as representing the highest type of 
the breeds. Other features of the equipment include photographs 
and charts utilized in the lecture room where it is not possible to 
make suitable representation with the living animals. It is the 
aim of the department to illustrate all lines of instruction with 
living representatives. The abundant material available from 
the herds and flocks is freely drawn upon and used extensively 
in all lectures and score card practice. By means of score cards, 
prepared by the department, the students are brought in close 
contact with the animals and through them are informed on the 
points of market merit desirable in ordinary stock; while later 
the use of the official scale of points for the different breeds in a 
similar way, makes them skillful in judging representatives of 
the different breeds. 

As soon as the student is familiar with the use of the score 
card, comparison judging is introduced. In comparison judging 
from four to six animals are used, and each student is required to 
place all the animals in order of merit, and write down clearly 
and concisely on a blank folder, prepared especially for this work, 
full reasons for making his awards. This kind of work teaches 
the student to compare animals and to balance the weak and 
strong points of each in making his final awards. As soon as the 
student demonstrates his ability to place classes well, herd groups 
and sweepstake classes are introduced during his Senior year's 



76 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

work. This kind of work is in accordance with the most difficul 
judging done at our leading state fairs and international exposi 
tions. As soon as the student shows that he possesses the quali 
fixations needed to successfully judge stock in the show ring, he i 
sent out in answer to the many requests from the secretaries t< 
judge various classes of stock at county fairs. This, in connectioi 
with his college work, results in crystallizing the lessons learnec 
in the class room. 

The following courses of study are given in Animal Hus j 
bandry: 

Couese I. — Market Types — Cattle and Sheep — First Term 
Freshman Year. This course covers the judging of the different ' 
market classes of cattle (beef and dairy) and sheep (mutton i 
and wool). Judging two 2-hour periods per week. Professor' 
Marshall and Mr. 

Couese II. — Market Types — Horses and Swine — Second 
Term. Freshman Year. This course covers the judging of the 
different market classes of horses (light and heavy), and swine 
(bacon and fat). Judging two 2-hour periods per week. Pro- 
fessor Marshall and Mr. . 

Couese III. — Breed Types — Cattle and Sheep — First Term. 
Sophomore Year. This course covers the judging of represen- 
tatives of the different breeds according to their official stand- 
ards; also a study of their origin, history, characteristics, and 
adaptability to different conditions of climate and soil. Lec- 
tures two 1-hour periods per week. Judging two 2-hour periods 
per week. Professor Marshall and Mr. . 

Couese IV. — Breed Types — Horses and Swine. — Second 
Term. Sophomore Year. This course covers the judging of 
representatives of the different breeds according to their official 
standards; also a study of their origin, history and character- 
istics, and adaptability to different conditions of climate and 
soil. Lectures two 1-hour periods per week. Judging two 2-hour 
periods per week. Professor Marshall and Mr. . 

Couese V. — Live Stock Management — The housing, feeding 
care and management of the various classes of live stock. Lec- 
tures two 1-hour periods per week. Professor Marshall. 

Couese VI. — Advanced Stock Judging. — First Term.. Senior 
Year. This course covers horses, cattle, sheep, and swine, es- 
pecial attention being paid to the judging of groups of animals 
similar to county and state fair work. Judging two 2-hour 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 77 

periods per week. This course is intended for students special- 
izing in Animal Husbandry. Professors Kennedy and Marshall. 

Course VII. — Animal By-Products and Herd Book Study. — 
Second Term. Senior Year. This course covers a critical study 
of animal by-products, as designated by the leading packing 
establishments, first half of term. Second half of term will be 
devoted to the careful study of pedigrees of the leading families 
of the various breeds of live stock. Two 1-hour periods per 
week. Professor Kennedy. 

Course VIII. — Principles of Breeding. — First Term. Junior 
Year. This course embraces a study of the principles of breed- 
ing, including selection, heredity, atavism, variation, fecundity, 
with the presentation of the methods of breeding, in-and-in 
breeding, cross breeding, etc., and a historical study of their 
results. In addition, the several features relating to the higher 
breeding of pure bred stock are made the subject of study and 
investigation. Two 1-hour period-s per week. Professor Curtiss. 

Course IX. — Animal Nutrition. — Second Term. Senior Year. 
This course includes anatomy and physiology of the digestive 
system, the purpose of nutrition, theory and practical economy 
of rations for growth, fattening, milk or maintenance; sanita- 
tion of feeds, and hygiene of the farm. Five 1-hour periods per 
week. Professor Kennedy. 

Course X. — Thesis and Investigation Work. — Senior Year. 
Upon lines to be arranged with the head of the department ac- 
cording to the nature of the subject. Professor Kennedy. 

SPECIAL COURSES. 

Students desiring shorter courses of study will be permitted 
to take up special courses in any line of work offered providing 
that they comply with the full requirements for admission to 
short course work as outlined elsewhere in this catalog. They 
must also have credits for all necessary work preparatory to 
the taking of such courses as are demanded of the regular four 
year men. 

WINTER COURSE IN STOCK JUDGING. 

In response to a widespread demand for special short course 
instruction in the judging and feeding of animals a two weeks' 
course has been established during the winter vacation. This 
course will begin January 4, 1904, and continue for two weeks 
and will be devoted exclusively to the judging and score card 



78 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

practice with horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs, and lectures o 
feeding the same. 

In this work special attention will be given to the selectio: 
of animals best suited for feeding purposes. Good specimen 
of the highest type of fat steer and ideal representatives of al 
the various breeds will be used for class work. At the conclu 
sion of the cattle work a slaughter test and block demonstra 
tion of the various market types of steers will be conducted unde: 
the supervision of John Gosling, Kansas City, Missouri. Thh 
course is intended especially for the man on the farm who can 
not avail himself of the opportunity to take a complete course. 

A special course in corn judging will be given at the same 
time and the work will be so arranged that all those present 
may take both lines of work. 

To partially cover the expense of securing additional help 
and stock for demonstration a tuition fee of $2.00 will be charged 
for admission to this course, but one fee will cover the instruction 
in both grain and stock judging. 

CREDITS FOR PRACTICAL WORK. 

Animal Husbandry students who, by previous agreement 
with the head of the aepartment, do practical work on breeding 
and feeding establishments during their course of study will be 
allowed credits on the following basis: Students who take prac- 
tical work of the kind described under the direction of the man- 
ager and render competent and faithful service will, on their 
return to college and the presentation of a concise written report 
or resume of their observations and experience, be entitled to 
the following credits in the four year course in Animal Hus- 
bandry: 

For three months, five hours of elective work in the Junior or 
Senior year; for six months, eight hours; and for one year, ten 
hours; not more than five of which shall be credited in any 
one term of the college course. 

CLAY, ROBINSON & CO. FELLOWSHIP PRIZES. 

Clay, Robinson & Co., Live Stock Commission Merchants, 
Union Stock Yards, Chicago, offer, annually, $1,000.00 in prizes 
to be awarded to the Agricultural Colleges making the best 
exhibit of live stock at the International Live Stock Exposition 
held at Chicago in December of each year. They stipulate that 
the money won by the various colleges shall be used for the 
establishment of fellowship prizes to be awarded to graduate 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 79 

students in the department of Animal Husbandry. These fellow- 
ships, amounting to $300.00 per student annually, are granted by 
the Board of Trustees upon the recommendation of the dean of 
the Division of Agriculture and the head of the department. A 
student holding a fellowship may pursue post-graduate work in 
Animal Husbandry. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SCHOLARSHIP. 

The State Department of Agriculture offers a scholarship 
prize of $200.00, open to young men of the state not enrolled as a 
regular or special student in any agricultural college, without bar- 
ring students of the special short courses in January. This 
scholarship is to be awarded for the best work in judging live 
stock and corn annually at the state fair in accordance with the 
rules and conditions prescribed by the state department of agri- 
culture governing this contest. This prize has been supplemented 
by some additional special prizes, making the scholarship worth 
about $250.00. 

POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

We are now in a position to offer post-graduate work along 
five distinct lines. Students to be eligible to take this work must 
comply with the College requirements for post-graduate work as 
stated elsewhere in this catalog. 

(a). Animal Nutrition. We have excellent facilities for 
advanced research work along this line on account of the vast 
amount of work done on the College farm, and on the Cook farm 
at Odebolt, Iowa, along the lines of horse, cattle, sheep, and 
swine feeding experiments. We have, annually, over one thous- 
and animals in feeding experiments under our direct supervision. 
Students desiring special research work along this line may 
do the same under the direction of the head of the Department. 

(b). Animal Breeding. A special line of research work has 
been outlined for students desiring special work pertaining to 
underlying principles of animal breeding. Special experiments 
are being conducted on the farm along new and original lines. 

(c). Study of Breeds. Our large collection of pure bred ani- 
mals representing almost every recognized breed of live stock 
on the continent affords us excellent opportunities for special 
work along these lines. We not only have typical specimens, but, 
in most instances, we have complete breeding herds, thus an 



80 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

excellent opportunity to study the adaptability of each breed 
to Iowa conditions. 

(d). Stock, Judging. We have unusual facilities for thor- 
ough work along this line. All of the various market types of 
animals are available, also good representatives of all the pure 
breeds. Animals are carefully examined on foot and afterwards 
slaughtered and cut up on the block and the exact percentages 
of the various cuts and the values of the same are ascertained. 

(e). Practical Management of Stock. This course will in- 
clude an exhaustive investigation and study of the methods in 
vogue on the best managed stock farms and breeding estab- 
lishments in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and other 
countries, and is intended especially for those students who are 
preparing themselves for managers of stock farms. 

POSITIONS OPEN TO MEN TRAINED ALONG ANIMAL 

HUSBANDRY LINES. 
The demand for competent young men thoroughly trained 
along the lines of practical and scientific animal husbandry work 
by far exceeds the supply. We are constantly in receipt of in- 
quiries for men combining college training with practical ex- 
perience and natural ability. There appears to be no limit to 
the demand at a compensation not exceeded in any other calling. 
Our course is so arranged that our students have an excellent 
chance to combine practical and scientific knowledge. A few 
of the many lines of work open to graduates of this department 
are: College and Experiment Station work, Agricultural jour- 
nalism, Managers of stock farms, Salesmen with commission 
merchants and Buyers for the packing houses at the many stock 
yard centers, Salesmen of animal feed stuffs manufactured by 
the packing houses, Glucose companies, Linseed and Cotton 
seed oil companies, etc., etc. At the present time we have not 
nearly enough good men to fill the positions open to graduates. 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE AND FORESTRY. 

HOMER C. PRICE, PROFESSOR. 
ARTHUR T. ERWIN, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. EDWARD E. LITTLE, 

ASSISTANT. 

The Department of Horticulture has offices, classroom and 
library on the second floor of Agricultural Hall, a laboratory 
building 35x50 feet, two stories high with a nine foot basement, 
greenhouses, consisting of a curvilinear palm house, 24x33 feet; 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 81 

an even span house 19x33 feet which is connected to the labora- 
tory and used for laboratory purposes, and three propagating 
houses, 10x33 feet. Additional greenhouses will be built this 
summer for the department which will make approximately 4,000 
square feet under glass. 

The main floor of the laboratory is divided into two rooms 
and will accommodate fifty students. One of the rooms is es- 
pecially fitted for the study of fruits, and opening from it are 
two refrigerators for the storing of specimens. The second floor 
contains photographic and dark rooms for the department, and 
the horticultural museum, equipped with a full collection of hor- 
ticultural implements and machinery. The museum also con- 
tains a large collection of fruit models and a horticultural herb- 
arium that is accessible to advanced students. 

The green houses give every opportunity for the student 
to become familiar with the management of plants under glass, 
and the collection of plants has been made with the view of hav- 
ing them of the greatest educational value. 

The department has a large library which is kept in the 
offices in Agricultural Hall and in addition to the complete files 
of horticultural publications of the country, possesses the private 
library of Charles Downing, the author of "Fruits and Fruit 
Trees of America," which contains many rare horticultural works 
as well as his original notes and manuscript. 

The land devoted to Horticultural purposes comprises about 
forty acres. In this area are orchards of varying ages from 
fifteen years down to those set within the last two years. The 
varieties of fruits on trial number more than one thousand, 
and include the hardiest types of native and foreign kinds. The 
student is thus afforded unusual facilities for observation and 
study. Adjacent to the orchards and small fruit plantations are 
the nursery grounds where the operations of the nurseryman 
in the various methods of stratification, budding and grafting are 
illustrated in a practical manner. A considerable area is devoted 
each year to the growing of vegetables and variety tests of the 
leading types are made in connection with the Experiment Sta- 
tion work, thus affording ample opportunity for field study in 
the methods of culture practiced by the amateur and market 
gardener. 

There is a forest plantation of about ten acres in which are 
growing a large number of the best varieties of deciduous trees 



82 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

for the northwest. A collection of over one thousand prepared 
sections of the American woods is used for illustrating the lec- 
tures on forestry. The campus and shelter belts surrounding 
the college give ample opportunity for a study of the compara- 
tive value of native and foreign trees when used for windbreak 
and landscape effect. 

The graduate who completes the course in Horticulture will 
find himself well equipped in the technique and applied principles 
of commercial horticulture. Fruit growing has become a spe- 
cialized industry and success rewards the laborer in propor- 
tion as intelligent skill and perseverance are applied to the 
work, with a thorough understanding of the principles. Grad- 
uates who desire to pursue post-graduate work will find them- 
selves well prepared to do so either at this or other institutions 
of like character. 

Text books are used in each course when it is possible 
to do so advantageously. Lectures are given when it is necessary 
to enlarge or supplement the text. Particular stress is laid on 
laboratory instruction and the facilities and equipment are ex- 
ceptionally good for this phase of the work. The following 
courses of study are offered: 

OUTLINE OF COURSES IN HORTICULTURE. 

Course IH. — Market and Home Gardening. — This course is a 
study of the small fruits and vegetables. It takes up the prin- 
ciples of culture, methods of harvesting and marketing, and the 
practical details of market and home gardening. Two recitations 
per week. First Term, Freshman. Professor Erwin. 

Course IIH. — Plant Propagation. — The course embraces a stu- 
dy of the principles of plant growth as affected by moisture, tem- 
perature, light and food supply. Propagation of plants by seedage, 
cuttage, layerage and graftage is studied. Laboratory work is 
given in the various methods of propagation, both in green- 
house and nursery. Two recitations and one laboratory period 
per week. Second Term, Freshman. Professor Erwin. 

Course IIIH. — Pomology. — Under this head the principles 
which underly successful orcharding in the northwest, and the 
history and characteristics of the leading varieties of orchard 
fruits are studied. Score card practice is given, describing ap- 
ples, plums, pears and grapes. Two recitations and one lab- 
oratory period per week. First Term, Sophomore. Professor 
Price and Mr. Little. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 83 

Course IVH. — Plant Breeding and Field Work. — The princi- 
ples and history of plant breeding and its special application to 
horticulture are studied. The commercial nursery stocks, theory 
and practice in pruning, and a study of spraying machinery are 
included in this course. Two recitations and one laboratory each 
week. Second Term, Sophomore. Professor Price and Mr. Little. 

Course VH. — Varieties of Fruit. — This is an advanced course 
in Pomology and is devoted to a study of varieties, their origin, 
history and synonyms. Special attention is given to important 
commercial types and to describing and judging fruit. One reci- 
tation and one laboratory. First Term, Junior. Professor Price 
and Mr. Little. 

Course VIH. — Forestry. — The course embraces a study of for- 
estry influences upon climate, rainfall and erosion. A system- 
atic study is made of the native and introduced forest trees of 
economic importance. Three hours per week. Second Term, 
Junior. Professor Erwin. 

Course VI IH. — Greenhouse Management. — This course in- 
cludes a study of greenhouse construction and heating, a systema- 
tic study of the more important greenhouse plants and methods of 
culture; also the forcing of vegetables in both greenhouses and 
hot beds. Laboratory work embraces the practical details of 
propagating and caring for plants in the greenhouses. Two 
recitations and two laboratories per week. Second Term, Junior. 
Professor Erwin. 

Course VIIIH. — Landscape Gardening. — The course embraces 
a study of the principles of landscape gardening, and a systematic 
study of the materials suitable for planting in Iowa for beauti- 
fying private and public grounds. Two hours. First Term, 
Senior. Professor Price. 

Course IXH. — Research. — This course offers an opportunity 
for students to carry on a special line of investigation which is 
mapped out and carried on independently by the student under 
the supervision of the head of the department. Two hours. First 
Term, Senior. Professor Price. 

Course XH. — Literature of Horticulture. — The course is de- 
signed to familiarize the students with ancient and modern 
writers on horticulture. Special attention is given to the writings 
of American authors and to current literature. Two hours. Sec- 
ond Term, Senior. Professor Price. 



84 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XIH. — Amateur Floriculture.- This course embraces a 
study of the propagation and general management of house 
plants, out door flower beds and ornamental shrubs. A system- 
atic study of annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, climbers and 
hot house plants is also included in the course. Two hours per 
week. First Term, Junior. The course is an elective in General 
and Domestic Science Course only. Professor Erwin. 

Couese XIIH. — Evolution of Cultivated Plants. — The course 
is a study of the origin and amelioration of the important hor- 
ticultural plants, including fruits, flowers and vegetables. Two 
hours. Second Term, Senior. Professor Price. 

Course XIIIH. — Thesis. — A subject shall be chosen under the 
direction of the head of the department, which shall require ori- 
ginal work to investigate. After the subject has been thoroughly 
investigated a complete write up of the results must be made. 
All required courses in horticulture except those given in second 
term senior are prerequisites of this course. A subject for in- 
vestigation may be chosen for Course IX. and the work con- 
tinued in Course XIII. Two hours credit for the second term, 
Senior year, will be given for this course. Professor Price. 

GRADUATE WORK. 

The department of horticulture offers graduate work along 
four distinct lines: 

Pomology. — The orchards of the department, which contain 
over two hundred and fify varieties of apples, one hundred and 
fifty varieties of plums, and fifty varieties of cherries, furnish 
abundant material for the specialist who desires to make a com- 
parative study of varieties. In addition to this, the department 
possesses the private library of Charles Downing and his un- 
published manuscript notes and descriptions; also several hun- 
dred catalogued descriptions of fruit that have been made in 
the last few years in the department. 

Plant Breeding. — For many years systematic plant breed- 
ing has been carried on by the department. The results of this 
work can be seen in all stages from the young plants just start- 
ing to grow to those that have been fruiting or flowering for 
many years. The department each year carries on extensive work 
in plant breeding in connection with the State Horticultural 
Society which offers exceptional opportunity for study and field 
experience by the specialist. The department is equipped with 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE ■ 85 

incubators, microscopes and other apparatus for laboratory in- 
vestigations. 

Greenhouse Work. — The greenhouses of the department give 
exceptional opportunity for investigation along this line. The 
department has five thousand square feet under glass, divided 
into eight different houses which are devoted to the growing 
of flowers, vegetables, and plant breeding experiments. Oppor- 
tunity is offered for investigation in greenhouse management, 
propagation of plants and a study of the insect and fungus en- 
emies of greenhouse plants. 

Forestry. — Iowa, being a treeless state, presents many new 
and unsolved problems of tree growth, such as adaptation of 
species to the varying soil and climatic conditions, influence of 
wind breaks and shelter belts, and the comparative rate of 
growth of the different species. Upon and adjoining the college 
grounds are groves of evergreen and deciduous trees of varying 
ages which provide facilities for investigation along this line. 
The department has in its museum forestry specimens represent- 
ing one thousand species. The department is also co-operating 
with the United States Weather Bureau in the investigation of 
the influence of windbreaks upon climate. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 

A. A. BENNETT, PROFESSOR. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 



The aim of the work in Agricultural Chemistry is twofold; 
namely, to give the student a fundamental knowledge of chem- 
istry, and then to apply this knowledge to the chemical problems 
of agriculture. 

A sufficient amount of time during the first year and a half of 
study is applied to the acquiring of chemical principles and re- 
lations, yet at the same time the application of these facts is 
considered and constitutes a portion of the work. In other words 
the study of the science of chemistry accompanies its application 
to agricultural questions. The later work of the courses is prin- 
cipally devoted to applied chemistry. 

The courses of study open to the undergraduate student are 
briefly described as follows: 

Course XXI. — Elementary Experimental Chemistry. — This is 
the introductory work for the students in the agricultural courses 
*and is intended to give knowledge of matter by actual handling 



86 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

jand experience with it. The recitations are upon the laboratory- 
work for the purpose of obtaining a first-hand knowledge of 
chemical changes. The student learns how, and the necessity 
for taking notes of useful data, how to interpret these facts and 
apply them to common chemical changes that are going on in 
nature. The course includes a study of the so-called non-metallic 
elements that are present in the air and soils, etc. There are 
three rcitations and two afternoons of laboratory practice per 
week. First Term, Sophomore Year. 

Course XXIII. — This course is a continuation of Course XXI, 
dealing with the metallic elements and their relation to those 
studied in the preceeding term. In this course the student be- 
comes acquainted with the basic elements in the soil and their 
relations to non-metallic compounds, i. e., the acids and their 
place in the formations of salts. He learns how to separate and 
recognize these elements, their compounds, preparatory to deter- 
mining them quantitatively. Three recitations and two after- 
noons of laboratory work are required each week. Second Term, 
Sophomore Year. 

Course XXV. — Organic Chemistry. — This course follows reg- 
ularly Courses XXI and XXIII and deals with substances pro- 
duced by animal and plant life. The laboratory study brings 
the student in touch with the properties and methods of prepar- 
ing organic food material. The sugars, starches and proteids, 
the simpler food material will be studied and at the same time 
the fundamentals of organic chemistry will be required. The 
work is divided into two recitations and two laboratory periods 
per week, during the First Term, Junior Year. 

Course XXVI. — Chemistry Applied to Agriculture. — This 
work will be introduced in the laboratory study by quantitative 
analysis of inorganic substances followed by analyses of soils, 
fertilizers and other inorganic substances related to agri- 
cultural processes. The recitation work, two hours per week, will 
follow the laboratory practice and be accompanied by text book 
and lecture study. 

Course XXVII. — Chemistry Applied to Agriculture. — This 
course will consider in an elementary manner the organic phase 
of Agricultural Chemistry and will deal with the chemical 
changes in foods during digestion and assimilation, and the 
changes that occur in the plant and animal body. Some time 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 87 

will be devoted to dairy products and especially to the methods 
of analyzing such substances for adulteration. Laboratory prac- 
tice will occupy two afternoons per week. 

Course XXVIII. — Dairy Chemistry. — Lectures and labora- 
tory practice. This course is for students in the one year course 
in dairying, and will be arranged to fit the needs and the prepa- 
ration of such students, but it will be an elementary character 
throughout. First Term. 

Course XXIX. — Continuation of Course XXVIII. Second 
Term. 

GRADUATE WORK IN AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 

Advanced work in agricultural chemistry leading to the mas- 
ter's degree in scientific agriculture may be selected either as a 
major or minor study. This work may be taken in the chemical 
department as a continuation of the work begun as an under- 
graduate of this college or any other college of equal rank. Or 
the student may elect to do this work with the chemical section 
of the experiment station thus coming in touch with the research 
work and investigations being carried on there. The following 
courses of graduate work are offered: 

Course I. — Chemistry of Soils. — This course embraces a 
study in soil chemistry and its relation to plant life, including the 
chemical composition, its relation to fertility, the determination 
of available plant food, fertilizers and other substances which 
are effective in the production of crops, also the study of rain 
and drainage waters, the loss of plant food due to improper 
drainage and other conditions. 

Course II. — Chemistry of Dairying. — This work will cover a 
general survey of the field of chemistry applied to dairy problems 
such as the composition and chemical changes of butter, milk 
and cheese, and also other oils and fats used as food products 
and for adulteration. 

Course III. — Chemistry of Feeds. — This course includes a 
careful study of the chemistry of plants and field crops, such as 
the chemical composition of corn, wheat and oats, methods of 
modifying and improving the chemical composition by selection 
and plant breeding, chemical study of growing plants during the 
various stages of development, etc., the effects of various elements 
in the soil on the composition and quality and the yield or pro- 
ductiveness of the grain and forage crops. The study of the 



88 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

chemical composition and nutriments of the various refuse and 
by-products used for stock feeding. 

Course IV. — Chemistry of Horticulture. — This course in- 
cludes a careful study of the chemical composition of fruits in- 
cluding the influence of various elements present in the soil on 
the composition, quality and productiveness of the orchard, 
vineyard or garden; also the influence of climatic conditions upon 
the composition and quality of fruits, and the influence of selec- 
tion and breeding. 

AGRICULTURAL GEOLOGY. 

Course IX. — Open to students in division of agriculture, 
Second Term, Sophomore Year, and counts three hours. The 
origin, mineralogy and physiography of soils with attendant 
problems are treated as fully as the time will permit. Dr. Beyer. 

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY. 
Prepared for students in Animal Husbandry (Veterinary Sci- 
ence, 55), and comprises lectures from models and prepared speci- 
mens, recitations and practical work in dissection. This course 
is given during the first term, Senior year. Dr. McNeall. 

THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB. 

A Students' Agricultural Club holds weekly meetings in 
Agricultural Hall for the consideration of current topics in agri- 
culture. A students' reading room is also maintained there, 
and all the leading agricultural journals are kept on file for the 
use of agricultural students. The College Library contains an 
extensive list of agricultural and scientific publications to which 
students are referred for original research and study. 

There are seven societies that hold their weekly meetings 
on Saturday evenings and serve to supplement the literary work 
of the college. All students are urged to join in the work of 
the Agricultural Club and advised to join one of the literary so- 
cieties and to avail themselves of these other adjunct means of 
instruction. The faculty of clear and concise thinking and 
speaking is of incalculable value to the agricultural student. 

REMUNERATIVE AND INSTRUCTIVE LABOR. 

The Agricultural courses afford opportunity to do consider- 
able work in the fields and about the barns and grounds, much 
of which is instructive and of practical educational value. The 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 89 

compensation for services of this kind ranges from 8 to 15 cents 
per hour, according to the merit of the work. Students are 
thus able to earn from one-fourth to one-half their expenses 
and at the same time materially strengthen the practical side 
of their education. A number of the strongest and most capable 
students have been aided in finding employment during vaca- 
tions with successful stockmen on good farms and in various oth- 
er positions in line with their chosen lines of work. Some young 
men have preferred to take a year of practical work in this way 
during their course, and it has invariably proved of marked bene- 
fit and enabled them to command more desirable and remunera- 
tive positions at the completion of their college work\ Too much 
emphasis cannot be placed on a thorough understanding of the 
practical application of correct principles in agriculture. 

SPECIAL COURSES. 

Students desiring shorter courses of study will be permitted 
to take up special courses in Stock Judging, Feeding and Breed- 
ing, Practical Agriculture, Dairying, Horticulture or Agricultural 
Chemistry, subject to the approval of the Dean of the division 
and the President of the college. 

Such courses may cover a period of one term, one year or 
two years, but special students are advised to take not less than 
one year's work in any chosen branch and in all cases where 
practicable or possible to do so, students are urged to complete the 
four years' course. The results will fully justify the time and 
expense required and modern agriculture demands thorough 
training, special fitness, and a high order of ability. No degrees 
are granted for less than four years' work. 

GRADUATE COURSES. 

Special facilities are offered for Graduate work in the fol- 
lowing lines: 

1. Agronomy, major or minor in 

(a) Farm Crops. 

(b) Farm Mechanics. 

(c) Soils. 

(d) Farm Management. 



90 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

2. Dairying. 

«,a) Dairy Bacteriology. 

(b) Dairy Research. 

(c) Factory Management. 

(d) Cheese Making. 

(e) Milk Production. 

3. Animal Husbandry. 

(a) Animal Nutrition. 

(b) Animal Breeding 

(c) Study of Breeds. 

(d) Stock Judging. 
*(e) Practical Management of Stock. 

4. Horticulture, major or minor in 

(a) Pomology. 

(b) Plant Breeding. 

(c) Greenhouse Work. 

(d) Forestry. 
5 Agricultural Chemistry, major or minor in 

(a) Organic Apricultural Chemistry. 

(b) Inorganic Agricultural Chemistry. 

(c) Sanitary Agricultural Chemistry. 

(d) Techincal Chemistry. 

The four years courses lead to the degrees of B. S. A., Bach- 
elor of Scientific Agriculture. Graduate Students are eligible for 
the degree of M. S. A., Master of Scientific Agriculture. This 
degree is granted only to students who have completed a four 
year course in this or some similar college and completed a two 
year graduate course in scientific and pracitcal agriculture, one 
year of which must be resident work at this college. The work 
required for a post graduate degree is largely in the nature of 
personal research and investigation under the direction of pro- 
fessors in charge of the studies chosen. The work selected must 
embrace a major and a minor subject in different departments. 

CREDITS FOR PRACTICAL WORK. 

Agricultural students who by previous agreement with the 
head of the department, do practical work on farms, horticultural 
or feeding or breeding establishments, beet sugar factories or 
forestry reservations, of recognized standing, during their course 
of study will be allowed credits on the following basis: Students 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 91 

who take practical work of the kind described under the direc- 
tion of the proprietor and render competent and faithful service, 
will, on their return to College and the presentation of a concise 
written report or resume of their observations and experience, 
be entitled to the following credits in the four year courses in 
Agriculture: 

For three months, five hours of elective work in the Junior 
or Senior year; for six months, eight hours; and for one year, 
ten hours; no more than five hours of which shall be credited in 
any one term of the college course. 

POSITIONS. 

The demand for competent young men thoroughly trained 
in practical and scientific agriculture and dairying exceeds the 
supply. We are in constant receipt of inquiries for men combin- 
ing college training with practical experience and natural ability. 
There appears to be no limit to the demand for the right kind of 
men and the compensation for such service is not exceeded in 
any other calling. In view of this demand for well trained men 
in the field of agriculture, students are urged to take a full four 
years' course, supplemented with extensive practical work and 
observation. To this end, a number of our best students have 
taken a term or a year out during their course on some of the 
best farms of this and other states; and many have secured em- 
ployment during vacations in large dairy and horticultural es- 
tablishments where the most valuable practical experience can 
be acquired. The importance of this feature of preparation can- 
not be overestimated and it is urged and recommended even 
where young men are entirely familiar with ordinary agricultural 
work. It enables the student to derive more benefit from his 
course in college and fits him for a better and more lucrative 
position after graduation. 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURE. 
AGRONOMY. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, I.) 

English, 5 (English, 1.) 



92 

History, 5 
Elocution, 2 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



(History, I. 
(Elocution, I. 



SECOND TERM. 



Advanced Algebra and Plane Geometry, 5 
Elementary Botany, 2 
Elementary Rhetoric, 5 
History, 4 
Elocution, 1 



(Mathematics, XIII.) 

(Botany, I.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, II.) 

(Elocution, II.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIEST TEEM. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Market and Home Gardening, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Corn and Grain Judging, 5 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

Composition, 1 

Military, 2 

Library Work, 4 hours per term. 



(Animal Husbandry, I.) 

(Horticulture, IH.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, I.) 

(Agronomy, I.) 

(English, III.) 

(English IX.) 

(Military, I.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 (Animal Husbandry, II.) 



Plant Propagation and Small Fruits, 3 

Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, 4 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Farm Mechanics, 5 

Entomology, 2 

Military, 2 



(Horticulture, IIH.) 

(Mathematics, XVII.) 

(Language, VI.) 

(Language, II.) 

(Agronomy, II.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Military, II.) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

Farm Crops, 5 

Pomology, 3 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 3 



(Agronomy, III.) 

(Horticulture, IIIH.) 

(Animal Husbandry, III.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



93 



Chemistry, 5 
Meteorology, 3 
Composition, 1 
Military, 2 



(Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

(Geology, I.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND TERM. 

Farm Mechanics, 5 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 

Agricultural Geology, 3 

Histology, 4 



Chemistry, 5 
Composition, 1 
Military, 2 



(Agronomy, IV.) 
(Animal Husbandry, IV.) 
(Geology, IX.) 
(Botany, III.) 
(Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 

(English, VI.) 
(Military, IV.) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Soils, 5 
Chemistry, 4 
Farm Dairying, 2 



FIRST TERM. 

(Agronomy, V.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 

(Dairying, XII.) 

Elective. 



Histology, 2 

Comparative Physiology, 1 

Surveying, 4 

Photography, 2 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Economic Entomology, 5 

Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 5 

English Literature, 3 

Debating, 1 

Elocution, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Principles of Breeding, 2 

Military Science, 1 

History of Agriculture, 5 

History, Mediaeval Institutions, 3 

History, French Revolution, 2 



(Veterinary Science XXXIII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Physics, IX.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, 1.) 

(English, VII.) 

(Elocution, III.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, III.) 

(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 

(Military, V.) 

(Agronomy, X.) 

(History, V.) 

(History X.) 



94 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND TERM. 



Soils, 5 

Research Work, 2 
Bacteriology, 2 



Elective. 



Comparative Physiology, 1 

Forestry, 3 

Public Speaking, 1 

Roads and Pavements, 2 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5 

Histology, 4 

Mineralogy, 4 

Finance, 3 

Money and Banking, 2 

English Literature, 5 

Elocution, 2 

French, 5, or 

German, 5 

Debating, 1 

Improvement of Farm Crops 

Military Science, 1 

History, Europe in the 16th, 17th and 

History, Europe since 1850, 2 



(Agronomy, VI.) 

(Agronomy, VII.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Veterinary, XXII.) 

(Horticulture, VIH.) 

(Elocution, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XIII.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Economic Science, IV.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Elocution, IV.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(English, VIII.) 

(Agronomy, X.) 

(Military, VI.) 

18th Centuries, 3. . 

(History, VI.) 
(History, XI.) 



Research Work, 2 
Farm Management, 
Chemistry, 4 



Dairy Bacteriology, 3 
Butter Making, 3 
Comparative Physiology, 2 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 
Geology, 5 
Political Economy, 3 
History Political Economy, 2 
Psychology, 5 



SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

(Agronomy, VII.) 

(Agronomy, VIII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

Elective. 

(Dairying, XVII.) 

(Dairying, XIV.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXIII.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, III.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(Philosophy, I.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



95 



Fiction, 3 
Elocution, 2 
Oration, 1 
French, 4, or 
German, 4 



(Literature, III.) 

(Elocution, V.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 



History. Development of the United States, 3 (History, III.) 

History, Reconstruction and the Constitution, 2 (History, XII.) 
Landscape Gardening, 2 (Horticulture, VIIIH.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VII.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Animal Nutrition, 5 
Thesis Work, 2 



(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 
(Agronomy, IX.) 



Elective. 



Dairying, 3 

Cheese Making, 3 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Technology of Milk, 1 

Advanced Entomology, 3 or 5 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 

Geology, 5 

Ethics, 3 

American Literature, 3 

Elocution, 2 

History of Civilization, 3 

The Far Eastern Question, 2 

Astronomy, 5 

Chemistry, 5 

Military Science, 1 



(Dairying, I.) 

(Dairying, XV.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXIV.) 

(Dairying, XVI.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Botany, VIII.) 

(Geology, IV.) 

(Philosophy, II.) 

(Literature, IV.) 

(Elocution, VI.) 

(History, IV.) 

(History, IX.) 

(Physics, VIII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

(Military, VIII.) 



COURSES IN AGRICULTURE. 

DAIRYING. 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, 5 
Elocution, 2 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, I.) 

(Elocution, I.) 



96 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND TERM. 



Geometry, 5 
Elementary Botany, 2 
Elementary Rhetoric, 5 
History, 4 
Elocution, 1 



(Mathematics, V.) 

(Botany, I.) 

(English II.) 

(History, II.) 

(Elocution, II.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Market and Home Gardening, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Farm Mechanics, 5 

History, Formative Period, 1 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

Military, 2 

Library work, 4 hours. 

SECOND TERM. 



(Animal Husbandry, I.) 

(Horticulture, IH.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, I.) 

(Agronomy, I.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(English, III.) 

(Military, I.) 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 (Animal Husbandry, II.) 



Plant Propagation and Small Fruits, 3 

Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, 4 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Corn and Grain Judging, 5 

Entomology, 2 

Military, 2 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



(Horticulture, IIH.) 

(Mathematics, XVII.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(Language, II.) 

(Agronomy, II.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Military, II.) 



FIRST TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, III.) 

Pomology, 3 (Horticulture, IIIH.) 
Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

Farm Dairying, 2 (Dairying, XII.) 

Farm Mechanics, 5 (Agronomy, III.) 

Botany, Ecology, 2 (Botany, II.) 

Composition, 1 (English, V.) 

Military, 2 (Military, III.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



97 



SECOND TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, IV.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 

Farm Crops, 5 (Agronomy, IV.) 

Bacteriology, 2 (Botany, VII.) 

Milk Testing, 3 (Dairying, XIII.) 

Composition, 2 (English IV and VI.) 

Military, 2 (Military, IV.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Butter Making, 3 
Dairy Engineering, 2 
Principles of Breeding, 2 
Chemistry, 4 
Soils, 5 



(Dairying, XIV.) 

(Engineering, .) 

(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 

(Agronomy, V.) 



Elective. 



Histology, 2 (Veterinary Science, XXXIII.) 

Comparative Physiology, 1 (Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

Physiography, 3 (Geology, I.) 

Shop Work, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XXXVIII.) 



Analytical Geometry, 5 

Surveying, 4 

Photography, 2 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 3 

Economic Botany, 2 

Economic Entomology, 5 

Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 5 

English Literature, 3 

Debating, 1 

Elocution 2 

Latin, 5, or 

German, 5 

History, Mediaeval Institutions, 3 

History, The French Revolution, 

Military Science, 1 



(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Physics, IX.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(English, VII.) 

(Elocution, III.) 

(Latin, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Military, VI.) 



98 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND TERM. 



Cheese Making, 3 
Technology of Milk, 1 
Live Stock Management, 2 
Soils, 5 
Chemistry, 4 



(Dairying, XV.) 

(Dairying, XVI.) 

(Animal Husbandry, V.) 

(Agronomy, VI.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVI.) 



Elective. 



Comparative Physiology, 1 

Public Speaking, 1 

Roads and Pavements, 2 

Advanced Analytical Geometry, 3 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5 

Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 

Histology, 4 

Mineralogy, 4 

Finance, 3 

Money and Banking, 2 

English Literature, 5 

Elocution, 2 

French, 5, or 

German, 5 

Debating, 1 

History, Europe in the 16th, 17th 

History, Europe since 1850, 2 
Military Science, 1 



(Veterinary, XXI.) 

(Elocution, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mathematics, XI.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Botany, XV.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Economic Science, IV.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Elocution, IV.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(English, VIII.) 

and 18th Centuries, 3 

(History, VI.) 

(History, XL) 

(Military, VI.) 



SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Dairy Bacteriology, 3 
Scoring Butter and Cheese, 1 
Research Work, 2 
Farm Management, 5 



(Dairying, XVII.) 

(Dairying, XIII.) 

(Dairying, XVIII.) 

(Agronomy, VII.) 



Elective. 



Comparative Physiology, 2 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 
Agrostology, 2 
Evolution of Plants, 1 



(Veterinary Science, XXIII.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Botany, XIII.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 99 

Geology, 5 (Geology, II. 

Political Economy, 3 (Economic Science, III. 

History of Political Economy, 2 (Economic Science, II. 

Psychology, 5 (Philosophy, I. 

Fiction, 3 (Literature, III. 

Elocution, 2 (Elocution, V. 

Oration, 1 (Elocution IX. 

French, 4, or (Languages, III. 

German, 4 (Languages, VII. 

History, Development of the United States, 3 (History, III. 

History, Reconstruction and the Constitution, 2 (History, XII. 
Military Science, 1 (Military, VII. 

SECOND TERM. 

Factory Management, 3 (Dairying, XIX. 

Preparation of Ice Cream and Ices, 1 (Dairying, XX. 

Animal Nutrition, 5 (Animal Husbandry, IX. 

Sanitary Science, 2 (Veterinary Science, XLV. 

Thesis, 2 (Dairying, XXI. 

Elective. 

Comparative Physiology, 2 (Veterinary Science, XXIV. 

Dairying, 3 (Dairying, I. 

Advanced Entomology, 3 or 5 (Zoology, IX. 

Calculus, 5 (Mathematics, IX. 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 (Botany, VIII. 

Geology, 5 (Geology, IV. 

Ethics, 3 (Philosophy, II. 

American Literature, 3 (Literature, IV. 

Elocution, 2 (Elocution, VI. 

History of Civilization, 3 (History, IV. 

The Far Eastern Question, 2 (History, IX. 

Astronomy, 5 (Physics, VIII. 
Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII. 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VIII. 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURE. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, I.) 

English, 5 (English, I.) 



100 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



History, 5 
Elocution, 2 



SECOND TERM. 



Advanced Algebra and Plane Geometry, 5 
Elementary Botany, 2 
Elementary Rhetoric, 5 
History, 4 
Elocution, 1 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



(History, I.) 
(Elocution, I.) 



(Mathematics, XIII.) 

(Botany, I.) 

(English II.) 

(History, II.) 

(Elocution, II.) 



FIRST TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Market and Home Gardening, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Corn and Grain Judging, 5 

History, Formative Period, 1 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

Military, 2 

Library work, 4 hours. 

SECOND TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Plant Propagation and Small Fruits, 3 

Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, 4 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Farm Mechanics, 5 

Entomology, 2 

Military, 2 



(Animal Husbandry, I.) 

(Horticulture, IH.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, I.) 

(Agronomy, 1.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(English, III.) 

(Military, I.) 



(Animal Husbandry, II.) 

(Horticulture, IIH.) 

(Mathematics, XVII.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(Language, II.) 

(Agronomy, II.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Military, II.) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, III.) 

Pomology, 3 (Horticulture, IIIH.) 

Farm Crops, 5 (Agronomy, III.) 

Vertebrate Zoology, 4 (Zoology, II.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

Composition, 1 (English, V.) 

Botany, Ecology, 2 (Botany, II.) 

Military, 2 (Military, III.) 






DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



101 



SECOND TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, IV.) 
Farm Mechanics, 5 (Agronomy, IV.) 

Invertebrate Zoology, 4 (Zoology, III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 

Composition, 2 (English IV and VI.) 

Military, 2 (Military, IV.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Principles of Breeding, 2 
Chemistry, 4 
Farm Dairying, 2 
Embryology, 3 
Soils, 5 



(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 

(Dairying, I.) 

(Zoology, V.) 

(Agronomy, V.) 



Elective. 



Histology, 2 

Comparative Physiology, 

Physiography, 3 

Shop Work, 1 

Analytical Geometry, 5 

Surveying, 4 

Photography, 2 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Cryptogamic Botany, 4 

Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 3 

Economic Botany, 2 

Economic Entomology, 5 

Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 5 

English Literature, 3 

Debating, 1 

Elocution 2 

French 5, or 

German, 5 

History, Mediaeval Institutions, 3 

History, The French Revolution, 

Military Science, 1 



(Veterinary Science, XXXIII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

(Geology, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXVIII.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Physics, IX.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Botany, IV.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(English, VII.) 

(Elocution, III.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Military, VI.) 



102 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND TERM. 



Live Stock Management, 2 (Animal Husbandry, V.) 

Animal Parasites, 2 (Zoology, VIII.) 

Soils, 5 (Agronomy, VI.) 

Chemistry, 4 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXVI.) 

Elective. 

Forestry, 3 (Horticulture, VIH.) 

Comparative Physiology, 1 (Veterinary, XXII.) 

Bacteriology, 2 (Botany, VII.) 

Public Speaking, 1 (Elocution, VIII.) 

Roads and Pavements, 2 (Civil Engineering, XIII.) 

Advanced Analytical Geometry, 3 (Mathematics, XI.) 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5 (Botany, XII.) 

Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 (Botany, XV.) 

Histology, 4 (Botany, III.) 

Mineralogy, 4 (Geology, VI.) 

Finance, 3 (Economic Science, V.) 

Money and Banking, 2 (Economic Science, IV.) 

English Literature, 5 (Literature, II.) 

Elocution, 2 (Elocution, IV.) 

French, 5, or (Languages, II.) 

German, 5 (Languages, VI.) 

Debating, 1 (English, VIII.) 
History, Europe in the 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries, 3 

(History, VI.) 

History, Europe since 1850, 2 (History, XI.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VI.) 

SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Advanced Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

(Animal Husbandry, VI.) 
Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 2 (Veterinary Science, LV.) 

Obstetrics, 1 (Veterinary Science, XIX.) 

Sanitary Science, 2, (Veterinary Science, XLIV.) 

Farm Management, 5 (Agronomy, VII.) 

Elective. 
Dairy Bacteriology, 3 (Dairying, XVII.) 

Buttermaking, 3 (Dairying, XIV.) 

Comparative Physiology, 2 (Veterinary Science, XXIII.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 103 

Vegetable Pathology, 2 or 5 (Botany, V.) 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, IX.) 

Agrostology, 2 (Botany, XIII.) 

Evolution of Plants, 1 (Botany, XIX.) 

Geology, 5 (Geology, II.) 

History of Political Economy, 2 (Economic Science, II.) 

Political Economy, 3 (Economic Science, III.) 

Psychology, 5 (Philosophy, I.) 

Fiction, 3 (Literature, III.) 

Elocution, 2 (Elocution, V.) 

Oration, 1 (Elocution, IX.) 

French, 4, or (Languages, III.) 

German, 4 (Languages, VII.) 

History, Development of the United States, 3 (History, III.) 
History, Reconstruction and the Constitution, 2 (History, XII.) 

Landscape Gardening, 2 (Horticulture, VIIIH.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Animal By-Products and Herd Books, 2 (Animal Husbandry, VII.) 

Horse Shoeing, 2 (Veterinary Science, XVI.) 

Conformation and Soundness, 2 (Veterinary Science, XVIII.) 

Animal Nutrition, 5 (Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

Evolution of Animals, 1 (Zoology, VI.) 

Thesis, 2 (Animal Husbandry, X.) 

Elective. 

Dairying, 3 (Dairying, I.) 

Cheesemaking, 3 (Dairying, XV.) 

Technology of Milk, 1 (Dairying, XVI.) 

Evolution of Cultivated Plants, 1 (Horticulture, XII.) 

Advanced Entomology, 3 or 5 (Zoology, IX.) 

Comparative Physiology, 2 (Veterinary Science, XXIV.) 

Calculus, 5 (Mathematics, IX.) 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 (Botany, VIII.) 

Vegetable Physiology, 2 or 5 (Botany, XI.) 

Geology, 5 (Geology, IV.) 

Ethics, 3 (Philosophy, II.) 

American Literature, 3 (Literature, IV.) 

Elocution, 2 (Elocution, VI.) 

History of Civilization, 3 (History, IV.) 

The Far Eastern Question, 2 (History, IX.) 



104 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Astronomy, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Military Science, 1 



(Physics, VIII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

(Military, VIII.) 



COURSES IN AGRICULTURE. 
HORTICULTURE. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, 5 
Elocution, 2 

SECOND TERM. 

Advanced Algebra and Plane Geometry, 5 
Elementary Botany, 2 
Elementary Rhetoric, 5 
History, 4 
Elocution, 1 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, I.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Mathematics, XIII.) 

(Botany, I.) 

(English II.) 

(History, II.) 

(Elocution, II.) 



FIRST TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Market and Home Gardening, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Corn and Grain Judging, 5 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

History, Formative Period I 

Military, 2 

Library work, 4 hours. 

SECOND TERM. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Plant Propagation and Small Fruits, 3 

Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, 4 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Farm Mechanics, 5 

Entomology, 2 

Military, 2 



(Animal Husbandry, I.) 

(Horticulture, IH.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, I.) 

(Agronomy, I.) 

(English, III.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(Military, I.) 



(Animal Husbandry, II.) 

(Horticulture, IIH.) 

(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(Language, II.) 

(Agronomy, II.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Military, II.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



105 



Pomology, 3 
Farm Crops, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Botany, Ecology, 2 
Meteorology, 3 
Farm Dairying, 2 
Composition, 1 
Military, 2 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

(Horticulture, IIIH.) 

(Agronomy, III.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

(Botany, II.) 

(Geology, I.) 

(Dairying, XII.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 

SECOND TERM. 



Field Work and Plant Breeding, 3 
Histology, 4 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5, or 
Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Agricultural Geology, 3 
Composition, 2 
Military, 2 



(Horticulture, IVH.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Botany, XV.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 

(Geology, IX.) 

(English IV and VI.) 

(Military. IV.) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Pomology, 2 
Economic Entomology, 5 
Cryptogamic Botany, 4 
Soils, 5 



(Horticulture, VH.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Botany, IV.) 

(Agronomy, V.) 



Elective. 



Histology, 2 
Physiology, 1 
Shop Work, 1 
Analytical Geometry, 5 
Surveying, 4 
Photography, 2 
Physical Laboratory, 1 
Advanced Cryptogamic 
Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 5 
English Literature, 3 
Debating, 1 



(Veterinary Science, XXXIII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXVIII.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Physics, IX.) 

or 2 (Physics, XIV.) 

Botany, 3 (Botany, VI.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(English, VII.) 



106 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Elocution 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

History, Mediaeval Institutions, 3 

History, The French Revolution, 2 

Military Science, 1 

SECOND TERM. 

Forestry, 3 
Bacteriology, 2 
Economic Botany, 2 
Greenhouse Management, 4 
Soils, 5 

Elective. 

Physiology, 1 

Public Speaking, 1 

Roads and Pavements, 2 

Advanced Analytical Geometry, 3 

Farm Crops, 5 

Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 

Histology, 4 

Mineralogy, 4 

Finance, 3 

Money and Banking, 2 

English Literature, 5 

Elocution, 2 

French, 5, or 

German, 5 

Debating, 1 

History, Europe in the 16th, 17th and 

History, Europe since 1850, 2 
Military Science, 1 



(Elocution, III.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Military, VI.) 

(Horticulture, VI.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Horticulture, VII.) 

(Agronomy, VI.) 

(Veterinary, XXII.) 

(Elocution, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mathematics, XI.) 

(Agronomy, IV.) 

(Botany, XV.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Economic Science, IV.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Elocution, IV.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(English, VIII.) 

18th Centuries, 3 

(History, VI.) 

(History, XI.) 

(Military, VI.) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Landscape Gardening, 2 
Research Work, 2 
Advanced Entomology, 3 
Chemistry, 4 
Vegetable Pathology, 2 



FIRST TERM. 

(Horticulture, VIIIH.) 

(Horticulture, IXH.) 

to 5 (Zoology, IX.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 

(Botany, V.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



107 



(Veterinary 



Elective. 
Dairy Bacteriology, 3 
Butter Making, 3 
Comparative Physiology, 2 
Farm Management, 5 
Agrostology, 2 
Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 3 
History, Political Economy, 2 
Psychology, 5 
Fiction, 3 
Elocution, 2 
Oration, 1 
French, 4, or 
German, 4 

History, Development of the United States, 3 
History, Reconstruction and the Constitution, 
Military Science, 1 

SECOND TERM. 



(Dairying, XVII.) 

(Dairying, XIV.) 

Science, XXIII.) 

(Agronomy, VII.) 

(Botany, XIII.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, III.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(Philosophy, I.) 

(Literature, III.) 

(Elocution, V.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(History, III.) 

2 (History, XII.) 

(Military, VII.) 



Literature of Horticulture, 2 
Evolution of Cultivated Plants, 2 
Animal Nutrition, 5 
Vegetable Physiology, 2 

Thesis, 2 



(Horticulture, XH.) 

(Horticulture, XIIH.) 

(Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

(Botany, XI.) 

(Horticulture, XIIIH.) 



Elective. 



Dairying, 3 

Cheese Making, 3 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Technology of Milk, 1 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 

Calculus, 5 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 

Geology, 5 

Ethics, 3 

American Literature, 3 

Elocution, 2 

History of Civilization, 3 

The Far Eastern Question, 2 

Astronomy, 5 

Chemistry, 5 

Military Science, 1 



(Dairying, I.) 

(Dairying, XV.) 

(Veterinary, XXIV.) 

(Dairying, XVI.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Botany, VIII.) 

(Geology, IV.) 

(Philosophy, II.) 

(Literature, IV.) 

(Elocution, VI.) 

(History, IV.) 

(History, IX.) 

(Physics, VIII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

(Military, VIII.) 



EXPERIMENT STATION 



110 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



E. W. STANTON, M. Sc, 

Acting President. 

C. F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Director. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B S A., 

Animal Husbandry and Vice Director. 

J. B. WEEMS, Ph. D., 

Chemist. 

L. H. PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. Sc., Ph. D„ 

Botanist. 

H. E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Entomologist. 

HOMER C. PRICE, M. S. A., 

Horticulturalist. 

JOHN J. REPP, V. M. D., 

Veterinarian. 

G. L. McKAY, 

Dairying. 

P. G. HOLDEN, M. Sc, B. Pd., 

Agronomist. 

W. H. STEVENSON, A. B., 

Soils. 

F. W. BOUSKA, B. S. A., 

Dairy Bacteriologist. 

E. C. MYERS, B. S. A., 

Assistant Chemist. 

E. E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

F. R. MARSHALL, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

C. LARSON, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Dairying. 

W. H. OLIN, M. Sc, 

Assistant in Agronomy. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 111 

ALFRED ATKINSON, 

Assistant in Agronomy. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. A., 

Assistant in Entomology. 

G. M. LUMMIS, 

Assistant in Botanj-. 
R. E. BUCHANAN, 

Assistant in Botany. 

CHARLOTTE M. KING, 

Artist. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The investigations of the Experiment Station have an inti- 
mate relation to the college work of instruction, as the problems 
occupying the attention of the Station are those that have a 
material bearing on the profit of the farm, and they are also those 
that are timely, and in need of accurate investigation. Whether 
relating to the field or the feed lot, the aim is to investigate those 
questions which will have a practical relation to successful agri- 
culture. Originality is made a feature of the work so far as it is 
consistent with useful results, and in all instances the sole object 
is to throw light on the truth relating to the various principles 
and practices of the farm. The field work strongly supports the 
instruction of the College in regard to the varieties of grains and 
the method of cultivation, thus enabling the student to become 
acquainted with the latest ideas relating to these. Thorough 
tests are made of the different varieties of fodders, grasses and 
grains. In addition to this, complete trials, embodying various 
crops and systems of culture, are carried on extensively each year, 
with the hope of giving direction to the farm management that is 
best for Iowa. 

The investigations with animals embrace a study of the value 
of different feeds for different features of animal production. The 
system of feeding, the preparation of different feeds are also 
made the subjects of investigation as far as it is thought they 
may be made a part of the methods of the Iowa farmer. Included 
with these, there have been a large number of trials with the 
different types of animals suitable for the requirements of the 
market. The object sought in this department of the Station 
work has been to indicate the manner in which the Iowa farmer 
through the employment of animals can realize the most from his 



112 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

farm products and add to the fertility of the farm. The Experi- 
ment Station has reached out in this way to a remarkable degree, 
bringing sheep from Mexico, Colorado and Scotland, cattle from 
Texas and Great Britain, horses from Wyoming, Montana and 
Europe, in its endeavor to thoroughly study this very important 
feature of the farmer's work. The data from these experiments 
is always accessible to the student and he has the opportunity of 
daily observing the development of it at every stage. 

The dairy industry is already indebted to the Experiment 
Station for doing much towards establishing it on a surer found- 
ation of accurate knowledge. The Station has always kept in 
closest touch with those engaged in the various lines of the dairy 
industry. Some of the problems which practical men are con- 
stantly meeting and asking aid in solving, are at all times objects 
of experiment by the Dairy Section. The students have the ad- 
vantage of seeing these experiments carried out, and in some 
cases assist in the work themselves. In this way they learn not 
only what are the chief problems to be solved but become in- 
formed on the methods employed in different lines of investiga- 
tion. The experimental work that has been so far conducted, re- 
lates mainly to the various problems of buttermaking while lately 
features of cheesemaking have been made subjects of special 
study. The records of these are abundantly used in class work, 
together with the results from the later investigations in the 
newer field of bacteriology. 

The Horticultural Department in its connection with the 
Experiment Station affords the student admirable opportunities 
for checking the theory of the class room against the practice of 
the field. The connection of the Department of Horticulture 
with the State Horticultural Society is such that problems touch- 
ing the commercial side of fruit growing receive the closest at- 
tention. The field equipment of the Department is excellent, so 
that experiments in spraying for the prevention of fungous pests 
and injurious insects may be carried on under the eye of the sttw 
dent; this is true also of other phases of orchard routine, such as 
fertilizing, pruning and thinning. The experimental nursery 
work carried on is of decided educational value. In plant breed- 
ing, extensive experiments have been inaugurated and are still 
in progress. The Station work thus equips the student with the 
practice and technique necessary to a thorough horticultural 
training. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 



114 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, A. M., LL. D. 

Acting President. 

JOHN H. McNEALL, V. M. D. 

Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Anatomy and Principles and Practice 

of Surgery. 

JOHN J. REPP, V. M. D., 

Professor of Comparative Pathology and Histology. 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Sanitary Science. 

WALTER H. STUHR, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Physiology and Therapeutics. 

WILBERT EUGENE HARRIMAN, B. Sc, M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 

Lecturer. 

CHARLES F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 
Dean of Division of Agriculture. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S A., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

LOUIS HERMANN PAMMELL, B. Ag., M. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Professor of Zoology and Animal Parasites. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

GENERAL JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Hippology, Military Science and Tactics. 

F. R. MARSHALL, B. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

GEORGE JUDISCH, 

Lecturer on Pharmacy. 

C. G. LEE, B. S., LL. B., 

Lecturer on Veterinary Jurisprudence. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 115 

F. W. BOUSKA, M. Sc, 

Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. Sc., 
Instructor in Zoology. 

MISS LOLA PLACEWAY, B. Sc. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

R. E. BUCHANAN, 

Assistant Instructor of Botany and Poisonous Plants. 

G. M. LUMMIS, 

Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

ANNOUNCEMENT. 

With this the twenty-second announcement of the Division of 
Veterinary Science of the Iowa State College the Faculty presents 
a graded course of study covering a period of four years of nine 
months each. 

Most institutions of learning owe their prestige to special 
achievements in some one department. Certain veterinary col- 
leges are especially equipped for the teaching of comparative 
pathology. Others excel in surgery and the general practicability 
of their courses. 

With our course complete in all branches we propose to 
broaden the present scope of veterinary education by offering 
such additional instruction as will train the student in all that 
pertains to the animal in health as well as in disease. 

Affiliation with the Department of Animal Husbandry of the 
Iowa State College enables the Division of Veterinary Science to 
offer a course not to be excelled in this respect. 

FIELD OPEN TO QUALIFIED VETERINARIANS. 

The student having completed the course of instruction out- 
lined in our curriculum becomes a veterinarian in the broadest 
sense and competent to enter a wide field of usefulness by any of 
the avenues enumerated. 

A. — General Practice. — In view of the fact that the National 
live stock valuation is estimated at $3,200,000,000, it becomes 
obvious that the graduate possessing fitness and aptitude for this 



116 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

kind of work will meet with a ready demand and substantial com- 
pensation for his services. 

B. — Animal Husbandry. — Qualified veterinarians will be 
called upon to act as counsel to the breeder and as guardians to 
the vast live stock industry of the nation. 

C. — Army. — The Veterinarians in the United States Army 
now have a position similar to that of a commissioned officer. The 
salary is $1,500 per year with a ten per cent increase for each 
five years' service up to twenty years with the same allowances 
as a second lieutenant of cavalry. 

These positions are most desirable and with our insular pos- 
sessions give opportunities for wide experience in professional 
work. 

D. — Bureau of Animal Industry. — Veterinarians are in de- 
mand for inspection work in the Bureau of Animal Industry, 
United States Department of Agriculture. 

E. — Municipal and State Veterinarians. 

F. — Veterinarians to stock farms and corporation stables. 

G. — Veterinarians to Experiment Stations and Instructors in 
Veterinary Colleges. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Candidates having a college degree, a teachers' first grade 
certificate, diploma from an accredited high school or those who 
have passed successfully the matriculate examination of a recog- 
nized college will be admitted without examination. 

Other candidates for admission will be required, 1: To write 
legibly and correctly an essay of not less than two hundred 
words; 2: To pass a satisfactory examination in Arithmetic and 
in United States History, and to present other evidence of 
sufficient ability to follow with profit the instruction offered in 
the Veterinary course. 

Graduates from recognized schools of Veterinary Science, 
Agriculture, Medicine, Dentistry or Pharmacy will be given 
credit for work pertaining to the course, upon the presentation 
to the faculty of satisfactory standing or upon passing an en- 
trance examinaion. 

REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION. 

Students are registered and classified by the President of the 
College subject to the advice of the Dean of the Veterinary Fac- 
ulty. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 117 

LENGTH OF TERMS AND YEAR. 

The year is divided into two terms, one of 16 weeks and one 
of 20 weeks; making a school year of nine months. 

The hospital and dissecting room are open during vacation, 
thus affording the student an opportunity to devote additional 
time to this work. 

EXAMINATIONS AND DEGREE. 

Examinations are held at the close of each term upon the 
work passed over during that term. At the end of each year the 
final examinations are held. Students must have passed exam- 
inations in all pre-requisite work of a given term or year before 
they can proceed with the work of the succeeding term or year. 
These examinations are controlled by the faculty rules. At the 
close of the course after passing a satisfactory examination, the 
student receives the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 
(D. V. M.). 

Candidates for graduation must be twenty-one years of age, 
of good character and must have passed examinations in all the 
required subjects in the course. 

MEMBERSHIP IN THE AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL 

ASSOCIATION. 

Graduates of this school are eligible to membership in the 
American Veterinary Medical Association. 

VETERINARY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

The Veterinary Medical Society of the Iowa State College 
was organized by the students for the purpose of investigating 
and discussing subjects relating to Veterinary Science. All ma- 
triculate students of the four classes are members and the 
diploma of the society is conferred upon graduates. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The Veterinary Hospital and the daily free clinics furnish an 
abundance of material for practical work. Situated in an exten- 
sive stock growing district, the College is especially favored in 
this respect, not only horses, but all species of animals, being 
brought to the hospital for treatment. Senior students are 
assigned cases for diagnosis and treatment under the supervision 
of the clinical professor, thus having an opportunity to apply the 



118 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

theoretical knowledge obtained in the class room. During the 
course opportunity is offered to witness all the different surgical 
operations performed in veterinary surgery, together with the 
methods of treating the different internal diseases. Junior stud- 
ents are detailed in alphabetical order to assist the pharmacist 
in the compounding of prescriptions, in this way becoming famil- 
iar with the various forms in which medicines are administered. 
A detailed description of the various branches taught in the 
course is given on the succeeding pages. 

The department occupies quarters in Agricultural Hall. In 
this building are offices for the veterinary members of the Fac- 
ulty, two large lecture rooms for the use of the department and 
a museum. 

The Veterinary Hospital is a substantial brick building three 
stories high, fitted with commodious, well lighted single and 
box stalls, operating room, office and pharmacy, resident surgeon's 
room, dissecting room, an elevator for the accommodation of the 
patients unable to use the runway to second floor, and is furn- 
ished with all the surgical instruments of modern construction, 
operating table and other important conveniences for hospital 
work. A number of fine grass paddocks directly adjacent to the 
hospital are used for such patients as are likely to be benefitted 
by out door exercise and a grass diet in the season. 

A laboratory constituting part of the Experiment Station has 
recently been equipped. This laboratory is intended for the pur- 
pose of bacteriological and pathological investigation of the 
diseases of the domestic animals. It is supplied with the most 
modern biological apparatus, such as high power microscopes, 
incubators, hot air and steam sterilizers, microtomes, stains, gas, 
water and electric light, and in fact all first class facilities for 
scientific investigation. Specimens are received frequently for 
examination. Students of the Veterinary Division may avail 
themselves of these facilities under the direction of the veterin- 
arian in charge. 

Aside from the facilities which belong especially to the Vet- 
erinary Division the equipment for instruction in Animal 
Husbandry is very complete. 

These are fully described in the catalogue under the write- 
up of the Animal Husbandry Department. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 119 

The work in botany, chemistry, zoology and other related 
studies is adequately provided for in the special buildings for the 
accommodation of these several departments of college work. 

LIBRARY. 

The entire college library of about 15,000 volumes containing 
a good variety of veterinary and medical books and journals is 
open to fche veterinary students. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE DOMESTIC 

ANIMALS. 

DR. MCNEALL. 

This subject is studied through the entire Freshman and 
Sophomore years and embraces Descriptive and Practical 
Anatomy. 

Descriptive Anatomy is taught by a series of lectures, in- 
cluding the study of the bones, articulations, muscles, circula- 
tory apparatus, the nervous system, the respiratory system, the 
organs of digestion, the urino-genital apparatus and the organs 
of special sense. The lectures are supplemented by demonstra- 
tions from mounted skeletons, prepared specimens, charts and 
an Auzoux clastic model. 

Practical Anatomy comprises a comprehensive and thorough 
course in dissection, which extends through the Freshman and 
Sophomore years. During each year the student is required to 
make two complete dissections of the horse and such parts of 
other animals as may be deemed necessary. Freshman students 
devote their time in the dissecting room to the study of the bones, 
articulations and muscles. Sophomore students make special 
dissection of the nervous system, circulatory apparatus, lymphatic 
glands, organs of special sense and the organs contained in the 
abdominal and thoracic cavities. The dissection is carried out 
in a systematic manner under the personal supervision and direc- 
tion of the Professor of Anatomy. Each student is required to 
properly dissect and pass an examination on the part assigned 
before passing to the dissection and study of another part. 

The subject is taught in four courses, as follows: 

Course I. — First term, Freshman year, three lectures each 
week. 



120 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course II. — Second term, Freshman year, three lectures each 
week. 

Course III. — First term, Sophomore year, three lectures 
each week. 

Course IV. — Second term, Sophomore year, three lectures 
each week. 

HISTOLOGY. 

DR. REPP. 

This subject is taught throughout the Freshman year by one 
lecture and one laboratory exercise each week. 

Course XXXIII. — This is given during the first term of the 
Freshman year. The subject is taught chiefly in the laboratory. 
Descriptions of the microscopic structure of the tissues are given 
and the students are required to observe these features for them- 
selves by the aid of the microscope. Students are taught how 
to collect, fix, imbed, section, stain, mount and preserve the nor- 
mal tissues of the various species of domestic animals and to 
study them under the microscope. 

Course XXXIV. — A continuation of the subject in the second 
term of the Freshman year. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

DR. STUHR. 

Physiology is taught by the comparative method, the vital 
phenomena of the domesticated animals being compared with 
those of the human being and the common features pointed out. 
Special attention is given to the variations occurring in the 
functions and extends throughout the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. 

Course XXI. — Higher forms of animal life are nothing more 
than mere association of the simpler organism, the modifica- 
tion of whose protoplasm leads to such specialization of func- 
tion as characterizes the different tissue of the body. 

It becomes necessary therefore to acquire some knowledge 
of the simplest expressions of these complex functions as man- 
ifested in the simpler organization. Thus general physiology 
deals with the animal cells, the unit of organization, its origin, 
modification of form and structure, chemical constitution and 
the various physical and chemical laws which influence its nutri- 
tion, growth, reproduction and development. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 121 

General physiology is taught throughout the Freshman 
year by a course of lectures one hour per week. 

Course XXII. — This is a continuation of Course XXI 
throughout the second term of the Freshman year. 

Course XXIII. — The study of special physiology is begun 
in the first term of the Sophomore year and continued through- 
out the year. It deals more particularly with the special func- 
tions of the various organs and tissues of the body. 

It is taught by two recitations per week. 

Course XXIV. — The subject of physiology is continued in 
the second term of the Sophomore year. 

F. Smith's Manual of Veterinary Physiology is used as a 
text in these courses. 

PHARMACY. 

MR. JUDISCH. 

This subject is taken up in the first term of the Freshman 
year and continued throughout the year. It consists of lectures 
and laboratory work. 

Course XXV. — All the official drugs and preparations are 
considered. Special attention is paid to practical pharmaceutical 
problems and manipulations. Each student is required to pre- 
pare at least one of each class of the official preparations. This 
course is given in the first term of the Freshman year and con- 
sists of one lecture and one laboratory exercise each week. 

Course XXVI! — In the second term of the Freshman year 
one lecture and one laboratory exercise each week are devoted 
to the principles and practical work of the compounding of 
prescriptions. 

MATERIA MEDICA. 

This subject is taught throughout the Freshman year and 
3 divided into two courses: 

Course XXVII. — As an introduction to the study of Materia 
Medica the student is first taught to familiarize himself with 
the definition and uses of such terms as he will encounter in 
his subsequent study of the subject. 

The classification of drugs presented is that in accordance 
with their most dominant action and includes all such agents 
as are employed in the practice of Veterinary Therapeutics. 
Each drug is studied in detail, attention being called to the fol- 



122 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

lowing characters: Official name, common name, origin, mode of 
preparation, description of properties, adulterations, incompati- 
bles; names of therapeutic action and preparations in the official 
U. S. Pharmacopeia. 

Samples of the various drugs and their preparations are 
exhibited as they are discussed in order that the student may 
become more firmly impressed with their leading characters. 
This course is taught by lectures one hour per week through- 
out the Freshman year. 

Course XXVIII. — This is a continuation of Course XXVII 
and is carried throughout the second term of the Freshman 
year. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

DR. STUUR. 

This subject is presented by a course of lectures of one hour 
per week extending throughout the Sophomore and Junior 
years. 

Course XXIX. — This is begun in the first term of the Soph- 
omore year. The same classification of drugs is followed 
throughout these courses as was presented in Materia Medica. 
This work is simply carried on from that point where the study 
of materia medica ceases. 

The work of this term is largely composed of such prelim- 
inary considerations as lead up to the subsequent study of ther- 
apeutics proper; thus the work is confined to the study of the 
modes of action of drugs; the physiological laws which govern 
the same; the absorption; elimination and methods of adminis- 
tration; dosage; idiosyncrasy, etc. 

This work is supplemented by a course of lectures on pre- 
scription writing. 

Course XXX. — The study of Therapeutics proper begins in 
the second term of the Sophomore year. 

Each therapeutic agent is considered in detail and the fol- 
lowing features brought out: The physiological and therapeutic 
actions, indications and contra-indications, toxicology and treat- 
ment, modes of administrations and dose. 

Course XXXI. — This is a continuation of Course XXX 
throughout the first term of the Junior year. 

Course XXXII. — The subject is completed in the second 
term of the Junior year. Lectures dealing with general thera- 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 123 

peutic measures are presented during the latter part of this 
term. 

The entire course is supplemented by reading from standard 
works on the subject. 

Window's "Veterinary Materia Medica and Therapeutics" 
is used as a reference. 

STRUCTURAL BOTANY. 

PROFESSOR PAMMEL. 

Course IX. — This course begins in the first term of the 
Freshman year. The work consists of recitations and lectures. 
The student is expected to become familiar with the morphology 
of flowering plants and the terms used in descriptive botany. In 
the study of identification and selection of drugs it is necessary to 
have a thorough botanical knowledge of general structural bot- 
any as well as vegetable histology. Vegetable drugs do not al- 
ways consist of the entire plant, but frequently of only parts. 
In this course the general structure of the plant, from the 
root to reproductive organs, is taken up and considered. In 
the laboratory the student takes up the histology of plants, es- 
pecially from the standpoint of pharmacognosy, with a brief 
survey of the more important plants from a systematic stand- 
point. 

There are two recitations and one laboratory of 54 hours. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR BENNETT. 

Laboratory study is the basis of the work done during the 
first year of the Veterinary Course to become acquainted with 
Inorganic Chemistry and the general principles of Qualitative 
Analysis. Special attention is given to those compounds that 
are important in Veterinary Medicine. Attention is also given to 
inorganic poisons and the general effects of these poisons on 
the animal body. 

During the first term of the Sophomore year the students 
in Veterinary Medicine are given a course in Organic Chemistry 
in which they become acquainted with the various hydro-car- 



124 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

bons, carbo-hydrates, and nitrogenous compounds, special atten- 
tion being directed to those substances used in pharmaceutical 
preparations. 

During the second term of the Sophomore year the student 
studies elementary Physiological Chemistry and a sufficient 
amount of the general principles of Quantitative Analysis to en-, 
able him to make complete analysis of urine. 

The laboratory provides each student with a separate table 
which is furnished with water, gas, and all the needed appara- 
us and re-agents. The cost of this work to the student is the 
cost of the material and apparatus consumed or destroyed in the' 
prosecution of the study. 

POISONOUS PLANTS. 

PEOFESSOE PAMMEL. 

Cotjese XVI. — The veterinarian is frequently called on to 
investigate poisoning. He should therefore be familiar with 
the plants responsible for poisoning live stock. In this course 
the subject is treated from the historical standpoint, with a 
brief reference to the history of toxicology; autointoxication; 
poisoning from ptomaines, toxines and the agents responsible 
for such poisoning; poisoning by fungi, like toadstools, ergot, 
etc. Dwelling on the life history of these fungi and the poisons 
they produce; the rusts and smuts, as possible causes of disease. 
The higher plants are then taken up in a systematic order, call- 
ing attention to the poisonous plants in the various orders and 
means for recognizing these plants. 

One lecture and one laboratory, of forty-eight hours. Second 
Term, Freshman year. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

PEOFESSOE SUMMEES. 

This course (Zoology I), given during the second term of 
the Freshman Year, is designed as an introduction to Zoological 
methods, especially to those of Systematic Zoology. The student 
also gets practice in the determination of insects, which is of 
special use later in his study of the parasites of domestic animals. 
Some training is had in the use of the microscope. The lectures 
deal chiefly with the physiology and life history of the different 



DIVISION OF VETEKINABY SCIENCE 125 

orders of insects. Incidentally the general principles involved 
in dealing with injurious insects, including parasites, are dis- 
cussed. 

PATHOLOGY. 

DR. REPP. 

This is taught by two lectures per week throughout the 
Sophomore and Junior year and one laboratory exercise per 
week during the Sophomore year. 

Two subdivisions of the subject are made, viz: General 
Pathology, Special Pathology. In connection with each morbid 
process the pathological anatomy both macroscopic and microscop- 
ic, the morbid physiology and etiology are considered. The sub- 
ject is taught by lectures. The diseases of domestic animals are 
made the basis of the work. The discussions are confined strictly 
to animal pathology. 

Course XXXV. — This is taken up during the first term of 
the Sophomore year. It consists in a study of the elementary 
morbid processes, viz: The infiltrations, degenerations, atrophy, 
hypertrophy, necrosis, gangrene, hyperaemia, ischemia, throm- 
bosis, embolism, hemorrhage, infraction. 

Course XXXVI. — This is presented during the second term 
of the Sophomore year. It completes the study of general 
pathology by a consideration of the composite morbid processes, 
viz: Inflammation, including the chronic specific inflammations, 
regeneration and tumor formation. Also the study of special 
pathology, that is, the consideration of diseases which occur in 
the individual tissues and organs, is begun. 

Course XXXVII. — This continues the study of special path- 
ology throughout the first term of the Junior year. 

Course XXXVIII. — This continues the study of special 
pathology throughout the second term of the Junior year. 

Microscopic pathology is taught in the laboratory during the 
Sophomore year in connection with Courses XXXV and XXXVI. 
The students are taught to collect, fix, imbed, section, stain, 
mount and preserve pathological specimens and to determine 
their characters under the microscope. Gross morbid anatomy 
is taught by autopsy and by the representation to the students 
of both fresh and preserved specimens. 



126 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

PKOFESSOR PAMMEL. 

Course VII. — This subject is taken up in the first term of 
the Sophomore year, and is conducted by laboratory work and 
lectures, covering approximately the following ground: 

History. Considering the subject from Lewenhoek's dis- 
covery in 1659, followed by the work of Plenciz who assumed a 
casual relation between micro-organism and contagious diseases. 
The works of Pollender, Davaine, Henle and Pasteur. Theory of 
fermentation, Caginard, Latour and Schmann, Bastian's 
theory of spontaneous generation; Pasteur's refutation; DeBary's 
work and higher fungi. The extravagant claims of Hallier and 
others. Lister's antiseptic treatment of wounds. The work of 
Cohn, Naegeli, Klebs, Pasteur, Buchner, Brefeld and Koch in 
cultivating germs. Rapid process in recent times. Anthrax, 
tuberculosis and germs in pus. Literature on the subject. 

What are bacteria? Structure, growth, nutrition and repro- 
duction. 

Morphology and systematic position of bacteria. Their re- 
lation to other plants. Classification of Ehrenberg, of Cohn, of 
DeBary, of Van Tiegham, of Pasteur, of Flugge, of Zopf. Diffi- 
culties in classifying bacteria. Physiological and morphological 
characters. Methods of sterilization, mounting, staining and in- 
oculation. 

History of anthrax, symptomatic anthrax, malignant oedema, 
tetanus, glanders, tuberculosis, swine plague, hog cholera, ty- 
phoid fever, diphtheria. The germs of pus, erysipelas, yellow 
fever, cholera nostras, caries of teeth, etc., are discussed. The 
characteristic growth and the morphological characters of the 
germs are given. The formation of ptomaines and enzymes and 
their relation to disease. 

Muir and Ritchie's "Manual of Bacteriology" is used as a 
text book. 

Recitations once per week. One laboratory sixty hours. 
First Term, Sophomore Year. 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS. 

Course LIV. — This course is designed to be introductory to 
the study of medicine. Since a correct diagnosis is the basis of 
all medicine, it is essential that the student be taught to recog- 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 127 

nize the various disturbances of function and the pathological 
conditions they indicate. 

The arts and methods of diagnosis are first considered, then 
general examination, special examination of the different ap- 
paratuses of the animal body and finally specific examinations, 
including experimental inoculations as a means of diagnosis, are 
studied. 

One lecture per week. First term, Sophomore year. 
VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

This course (Zoology II), given during the first term of the 
Sophomore year, consists mainly of a laboratory study of the 
anatomy, including histology, of a typical vertebrate. This 
serves as an introduction to the methods of gross dissection, and 
gives practice in the use of the microscope. The study of a ser- 
ies of other forms of vertebrates follows, leading to a knowledge 
of general vertebrate structure. The laboratory work is supple- 
mented by lectures on the general morphology and classification 
of vertebrates. 

ANIMAL PARASITES. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

In the second term of the Sophomore year is given a course 
(Zoology VIII), of lectures upon the Zoo-parasites of domestic 
animals. Detailed descriptions are given of the life histories of 
the most important species attacking animals in the United 
States, special emphasis being laid upon such portions of their 
economy as may render them open to treatment by preventive or 
remedial measures. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

The following courses are given in Animal Husbandry: 
Course I. — Market Types — Cattle and Sheep. — First Term, 
Sophomore Year. This course covers the judging of the different 
market classes of cattle (beef and dairy) and sheep (mutton and 
wool). Judging, two 2-hour periods per week. Professor Mar- 
shall and Mr. . 

Course II. — Market Types — Horses and Swine. — Second 
Term, Sophomore Year. This course covers the Judging of the 
different market classes of horses (light and heavy) and swine 
(bacon and fat). Judging, two 2-hour periods per week. Pro- 
fessor Marshall and Mr. . 



128 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course III. — Breed Types — Cattle and Sheep. — First Term 
Junior year. This course covers the judging of representatives 
of the different breeds according to their official standards; als( 
a study of their origin, history, characteristics, and adaptability 
to different conditions of climate and soil. Lectures two hou: 
periods per week. Judging two 2-hour periods per week. Pro 
fessor Marshall and Mr. . 

Course IV. — Breed Types — Horses and Swine. — Second Term 
Junior Year. This course covers the judging of representatives 
of the different breeds according to their official standards; alsc 
a study of their origin, history and characteristics, and adapta 
bility to different conditions of climate and soil. Lectures twc 
1-hour periods per week. Professor Marshall and Mr. 

Course V. — Live Stock Management. — The housing, feeding 
care and management of the various classes of live stock. Lec- 
tures two 1-hour periods per week. Second Term, Junior Year. 
Professor Marshall. 

Course VIII. — Principles of Breeding. — First Term, Junior 
Year. This course embraces a study of the principles of breeding, 
including selection, heredity, atavism, variation, fecundity; with 
the presentation of the methods of breeding, in-and-in breeding, 
cross breeding, etc., and a historical study of their results. In 
addition, the several features relating to the higher breeding of 
pure bred stock are made the subject of study and investigation. 
Two 1-hour periods per week. Professor Curtiss. 

Course IX. — Animal Nuiriiioii. — Second Term, Senior Year. 
This course includes anatomy and physiology of the digestive 
system, the purpose of nutrition, theory and practical economy of: 1 
rations for growth, fattening, milk or maintenance; sanitation 
of feeds, ana hygiene of the farm. Five 1-hour periods per week. 
Professor Kennedy. 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE. 

DR. GAY. 

The study of medicine is begun the first term of the Junior 
Year and is continued throughout the course. 

Course XXXX. — The First Term, Junior Year, three recita- 
tions per week. 

Course XXXXI. — Second Term, Junior Year, three recita- 
tions per week. 



DIYISIOIl OF VETERINARY SCIENCE l29 

Ooubse XXXXII. — First Term, Senior Year, three recita- 
tions per week. 

Coubse XXXXIII. — Second Term, Senior Year, three recita- 
tions per week. 

Instruction consists chiefly of recitations from a standard 
text supplemented by practice in the daily clinics. Courses 
XXXX. XXXXI, XXXXII cover the work on congestion, inflam- 
mation and fever, diseases of the respiratory system, circulatory 
system, blood and lymph; digestive apparatus, nervous system, 
genito-urinary system, diseases of the eye, skin, and the non- 
infectious constitutional diseases. 

Course XXXXIII is devoted to the study of the history, 
etiology, symptoms, lesions, differential diagnosis and treatment 
of the infectious animal diseases and diseases caused by animal 
parasites. Assuming the student to have had the prescribed work 
in bacteriology it is deemed advisable to review the morphology 
and the cultural characteristics of the specific organisms in 
connection with the symptoms and lesions which they produce. 

Thus the importance of a bacteriological examination as a 
means of positive diagnosis is emphasized. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY. 

DR. HARRIMAN. 

Course XLIX. — The Course in Ophthalmology is given in the 
second term of the Senior Year. It consists of one lecture per 
week supplemented by demonstrations upon models and cases. 

It is the aim of this course to familiarize the student with 
methods of examination and diagnosis in particular, as well as 
general principles and special forms of treatment. 

PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF SURGERY. 

DR. MCNEALE. 

This subject is taught to Junior and Senior students in four 
courses, as follows: 

Course X. — First Term Junior Year, three lectures each 
veek. 

Course XI. — Second Term, Junior Year, three hours each 
reek. 

Course XII. — First Term, Senior Year, three hours each week. 

Course XIII. — Second Term, Senior Year, three hours each 
veek. 

9 



130 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

General and Special Surgery are taught in the Junior and 
the Senior Year, the didactic lectures being supplemented by- 
demonstrations in the clinics. 

General Surgery embraces the following subjects: Surgical 
bacteriology, the pathology and treatment of inflammation, dis- 
eases of the bones, nerves, articulations, muscles, tendons, tendon 
sheaths and bursae; methods of amputation and exarticulation; 
suturing and the general treatment of wounds; methods of an- 
aesthesia; intra-venous and sub-cutaneous injections; castration; 
methods of restraint in securing animals, and the methods of 
actual cautery. 

Special Surgery includes the surgical diseases of the head, 
neck, thorax, abdomen, urino-genital organs, fore-limb, hind-limb, 
vertebrae, pelvis, and the surgical diseases of the stomach and 
bowels. 

EMBRYOLOGY. 

PEOFESSOE SUMMEES. 

The foundation of this course (Zoology V), consists of labor- 
atory work on the chick and to a small extent on the frog. The 
lectures deal with the general principles of development, includ- 
ing the structure of the germ cells, maturation and fertilization, 
and the modifications of cleavage and gastrulation found in the 
different classes of vertebrates. The peculiarities of the develop- 
ment of mammals are also discussed. 



HORSE-SHOEING. 

Couese XVI. — This course is devoted to the study of the 
anatomy and physiology of the foot; the relation between the 
form of the foot and direction of the limb; ariation in the flight 
of the foot; style of going; the shoeing of normal and irregular 
feet; winter shoeing; hoof nurture; correction of defects in gait 
and the methods of shoeing hoofs defective in form or diseased. 
Instruction is by two recitations per week the second term, 
Junior year. 

MILK INSPECTION. 

Dairying XVIII. — This course embraces a thorough study of 
the composition of milk and its products and their variations. 
The Babcock test for finding the amount of butter-fat; the use of 
the lactometer for finding the specific gravity and calculating the 






DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 131 

milk solids are made leading features of the course. The detec- 
tion of the most common adulterations and preservatives in milk 
is also taken up. 

The course consists of one laboratory period and one recita- 
tion per week. It is given in the second term of the year. Mr. 
Bouska. 

SURGICAL ANATOMY. 

Course V. — This work is discussed during the first term of 
the Senior year, being a continuation of the course in anatomy, 
but studied with special reference to its relation to surgery and 
not as an abstract science. 

The student is taught to apply the systematic anatomy stud- 
ied during the first two years. 

The course embraces surface anatomy, the outline of organs, 
location of joints, significance of bony projections and muscular 
swells, position, relations and means of recognizing various 
arteries and nerves, relation of tissues in organs to each other 
including a general review of all practical anatomy. 

PRACTICAL OPERATIVE SURGERY. 

In the course in Operative Surgery the student is required to 
perform all the operations that are found necessary in veterinary 
practice. Five hours each week are devoted to this work. The 
subject is covered in two courses, as follows: 

Course XIV. — First Term, Senior Year. 

Course XV. — Second Term, Senior Year. 

SANITARY SCIENCE. 

DR. GAY. 

These courses are designed to train the student in all that 
pertains to preventive medicine. 

Course XXXXIV. — Consists of the consideration of health 
and disease; the etiology of disease, predisposing and exciting; 
means and manner of propagation and transmission of infectious 
diseases; general hygiene and stable sanitation, including ven- 
tilation, drainage, selection of site and materials for construction. 
Two hours per week, First Term, Senior Year. 

Course XXXXV. — A consideration of practical methods of 
disinfection with a discussion of disinfecting agents, physical and 
chemical; methods of dipping and dips; principles of serum 



132 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

therapy, vaccination and quarantine. During the latter part of 
this course the sanitary police of the individual infectious and 
parasitic animal diseases are discussed. Two hours per week, 
Second Term, Senior Year. 

MEAT INSPECTION. 

This comparatively new branch of veterinary work is given 
the attention which its present importance deserves. The sub- 
ject is approached from the American point of view, and the 
students are taught how to perform the work with that rapidity 
and thoroughness required by the U. S. Bureau of Animal Indus- 
try. The instruction which the student receives in the courses 
in anatomy, physiology, pathology, bacteriology, animal parasites 
and veterinary medicine makes it possible to cover this subject 
in the one course described below: 

Course XXXIX. — Two lectures are given each week in the 
first term of the Senior Year, embracing the following topics: 
The physical characters of normal flesh and organs; the methods 
of slaughter; the principles of refrigeration and preservation; 
the effect of accidental and pathological conditions on the preser- 
vation and edibility of meats. 

The putrefaction of meats and the consequences of the inges- 
tion of such meats by man; the effects upon the meat of various 
constitutional and infectious diseases; the transmissibility of the 
disease to man; the effects of cooking on transmissibility; the 
meat inspection laws of the United States. 

CONFORMATION AND SOUNDNESS. 

Course XVIII. — This course is taught by lectures and prac- 
tical demonstrations upon the living animal. The student studies 
the conformation of the horse with special reference to the defects 
which exist and predispose to pathological changes causing un- 
soundness. 

Comparisons are made between normal and diseased parts 
and a systematic classification arranged to conform to the regions 
and parts involved. 

OBSTETRICS. 

Course XIX. — This course is devoted to physiological obstet- 
rics; Ovulation, oestrum, fecundation, sterility, gestation, the 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 133 

hygiene of pregnant animals; and parturition. One hour per 
week, First Term, Senior Year. 

This work is preceded by Zoology V. 

Course XX. — This course is devoted to pathological obste- 
trics. The diseases and accidents of pregnancy; dystokia; ob- 
stetrical operations; the sequelae of parturition; and diseases of 
the young animal. One hour per week, Second Term, Senior Year. 

HIPPOLOGY. 

GENERAL LINCOLN. 

Course XXXXVII. — It is as essential for the veterinarian to 
maintain the health and strength of the horse as to care for and 
treat the sick and disabled animal. 

This course studies the horse as a machine and the bridle, 
saddle and harness as aids in the use of his powers, as well as the 
management of the horse in the stable and in the field so as to 
best maintain his usefulness. 

The following topics are studied: The framework of the 
horse from a mechanical standpoint; bits and bitting; saddling; 
draft and harness. The care of animals in garrison and in the 
field, including watering, feeding and grooming. 

This subject is taught by one lecture per week the second 
term of the Senior Year. 

JURISPRUDENCE. 

MR. LEE. 

Course XLVIII. — The work in this course consists of a study 
of the rights and duties of the veterinary practitioner; the rights 
and duties of the owner or value of domestic animals; contracts 
and sales as applied to dealings in live stock; the subject of 
expert testimony. One lecture is given each week in the second 
term of the Senior Year. 

CLINICS. 

DRS. MCNEALL, GAY AND STUHR. 

The practical work afforded by the clinics is considered a 
highly essential part of the instruction given to the student. A 
student's didactic instruction will do him but little good if at the 
same time he is not required to put his knowledge into practice. 
Also, a student shows his fitness for membership in the profession 



134 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

chiefly by the degree of aptness which he exhibits in his practical 
work. The clinical training which he gets here gives him an 
opportunity to acquire the aptitude which is requisite for his 
professional work. Free clinics are held at the hospital every day 
from 1 to 3 o'clock P. M. The cases brought to the hospital for 
treatment are assigned to the senior students in alphabetical 
order and the students are required to prepare a full report of 
their examination, diagnosis, and proposed treatment and hand 
it to the clinician when he comes to examine the case. These 
reports are tnen graded by the clinician according to their merits. 
The hospital cases are assigned to the senior students who are 
required to treat them and keep a careful report of the case under 
the direction and supervision of the clinical instructors. The 
junior students are required to assist the seniors in their clinical 
and hospital work. The term grades of the students are made up 
from their attendance, and character of their clinical and hospital 
work. The clinical professor upon examination of a case or per- 
formance of an operation or administration of internal treatment 
gives to the students a clinical lecture upon the various aspects 
of the case before them. In this exhaustive way each case is 
made to yield the utmost good to the student. Animals of all 
species are brought in considerable numbers to the hospital from 
the surrounding excellent stock-growing territory and in this way 
the students come into intimate contact with a great variety of 
diseases, and acquire a familiarity with their treatment such as 
will enable them to give good service to their clients immediately 
upon their entrance into practice. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

FIKST TERM. 

Comparative Anatomy, 3 (Veterinary, I.) 

Dissection, 6 (Veterinary, VI.) 

Comparative Physiology, 1 (Veterinary, XXI.) 

Histology, 2 (Veterinary, XXXIII.) 

(One laboratory period.) 

Materia Medica, 1 (Veterinary, XXVII.) 

Pharmacy, 2 (Veterinary, XXV.) 

(One laboratory period.) 



DIVISION OF VETERINAKY SCIENCE 



135 



Structural Botany, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Inorganic Chemistry, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Military Drill, 2 



SECOND TERM. 



Comparative Anatomy 
Dissection, 6 

Comparative Physiology, 1 
Histology, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Materia Medica, 1 
Pharmacy, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Poisonous Plants and Fungi, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Entomology, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Inorganic Chemistry, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Military Drill, 2 



(Botany, IX.) 



(Chemistry, I.) 



(Military, I.) 



(Veterinary, II.) 

(Veterinary, VII.) 

(Veterinary, XXII.) 

(Veterinary XXXIV.) 

(Veterinary, XXVIII.) 
(Veterinary, XXVI.) 

(Botany, XVI.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Chemistry, IV.) 



(Military, II.) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

Comparative Anatomy, 3 

Dissection, 6 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

(Two 2-hour periods.) 
Therapeutics, 1 
General Pathology, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Bacteriology, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Zoology, 4 

(One laboratory period.) 
Physical Diagnosis, 1 
Organic Chemistry, 2 
Military Drill, 2 



(Veterinary, III.) 

(Veterinary, VIII.) 

(Veterinary, XXIII.) 

(Animal Husbandry, I.) 

(Veterinary, XXIX.) 
(Veterinary, XXXV.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Zoology, II.) 

(Veterinary, LIV.) 

(Chemistry, X.) 

(Military, III.) 



136 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND TERM. 

Comparative Anatomy, 3 

Dissection, 6 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

(Two 2-hour periods.) 
Therapeutics, 1 
General Pathology, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Animal Parasites, 2 
Physiological Chemistry, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Military Drill, 2 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



(Veterinary, IV.) 

(Veterinary, IX.) 

(Veterinary, XXIV.) 

(Animal Husbandry, II.) 

(Veterinary, XXX.) 
(Veterinary, XXXVI.) 

(Zoology, VIII.) 
(Chemistry, XIII.) 

(Military, IV.) 



FIRST TERM. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine, 3 (Veterinary, XL.) 

Principles and Practice of Surgery, 3 (Veterinary, X.) 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, III.) 

(Two lectures and two judging periods). 
Principles of Breeding, 2 (Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 

Therapeutics, 1 (Veterinary, XXXI.) 

Special Pathology, 2 (Veterinary, XXXVII.) 

Embryology, 3 (Zoology, V.) 

(One laboratory period.) 

Clinics, 6 (Veterinary L.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine, 3 (Veterinary, XLI.) 

Principles and Practice of Surgery, 3 (Veterinary, XI.) 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, IV.) 

(Two lectures and two judging periods.) 

Live Stock Management, 2 (Animal Husbandry, V.) 

Therapeutics, 1 (Veterinary, XXXII.) 

Special Pathology, 2 (Veterinary, XXXVIII.) 

Milk Inspection, 2 (Dairying, XVIII.) 

(One laboratory period.) 

Horse Shoeing, 2 (Veterinary, XVI.) 

Clinics, 6 (Veterinary, LI.) 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 



137 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Theory and Practice of Medicine, 3 

Principles and Practice of Surgery, 3 

Operative Surgery, 5 

Surgical Anatomy, 1 

Ophthalmology, 1 

Sanitary Science, 2 

Obstetrics, 1 

Hippology, 1 

Meat Inspection, 2 

Jurisprudance, 1 

Clinics, 6 

SECOND TERM. 



Theory and Practice of Medicine, 3 

Principles and Practice of Surgery, 

Operative Surgery, 5 

Sanitary Science, 2 

Animal Nutrition, 5 

Obstetrics, 1 

Hippology, 1 

Conformation and Soundness, 2 

Clinics, 6 



(Veterinary, XLII.) 

(Veterinary, XII.) 

(Veterinary, XIV.) 

(Veterinary, V.) 

(Veterinary, XLIX.) 

(Veterinary, XLIV.) 

(Veterinary, XIX.) 

(Veterinary, XLVI.) 

(Veterinary, XXXIX.) 

(Veterinary, XLVIII.) 

(Veterinary, LII.) 



(Veterinary, XLIII.) 

(Veterinary, XIII.) 

(Veterinary, XV.) 

(Veterinary, XLV.) 

(Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

(Veterinary, XX.) 

(Veterinary, XLVII.) 

(Veterinary, XVIII.) 

(Veterinary, LIII.) 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



140 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc, 

Acting President and Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 

f Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc, 

Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology and Mining Engineering. 

WARREN H. MEEKER, M. E., 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

BURTON S. LANPHEAR, M. M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

L. E. ASHBAUGH, B. S. in E., Ph. B., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS ELMINA T. WILSON, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

HERBERT W. DOW, B. Sc, M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

LOUIS EMMANUEL YOUNG, B. Mm. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. 

TALBOT LENNOX, 

Instructor in Machine Shop. 

EZRA C. POTTER, 

Instructor in Pattern Shop. 

*EDWIN CLARKE BOUTELLE, B. E., 

Instructor in Forge and Foundry. 

IRA A. WILLIAMS, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Geology and Mining. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 



^Resigned December, 1902. His place will be taken by J. A. Knesche. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 141 

M. P. CLEGHORN, B. Sc. in E. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

J. E. STEWART, B C. E., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

J. A. KNESCHE, 

Instructor in Forging. 
(After April i, 1903.) 

G. N. MERENESS, 

Assistant in Electrical Engineering. 

R. E. PESHAK, 

Assistant in Forge and Foundry. 
(Until April 1, 1903.) 

HARVA OTIS, 

Assistant in Machine Work. 

T. R. AGG, 

Assistant in Foundry. 
(Spring.) 

M. L. KING, 
Student Assistant in Pattern Shop. 

GENERAL JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Military Science. 
ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

MISS LIZZIE M. ALLIS, B. A., M. A., 

Professor of French and German. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. 0., 

Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History and Philosophy. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

MISS LOLA PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 
MISS ELIZABETH M VCLEAN, M. Di.. 

Instructor in English. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
E. B. TUTTLE, B. S. in E. E., 

Instructor in Physics. 



142 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
MISS HELEN G. REED, 

Instructor in English. 

MISS GRACE I. NORTON, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

MISS ADA J. MILLER, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS SADIE HOOK, B. L., 

Instructor in Elocution and Physical Culture for Women. 

CHESTER M. PERRIN, B. Sc., 

Instructor in History. 

BENJAMIN H. HIBBARD, B. Ac, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Economic Science. 

F. WENNER, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS BERYL A. HOYT, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ANNIE W. FLEMMING, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS MAE MILLER, B. Sc, 

Instructor in History. 

MISS ORA F. EDGETT, B. Sc, 

Iustructor in Chemistry. 

WARD JONES. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 

Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE STEVENS, B. L., 

Assistant Librarian. 



NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS. 

W. J. KARNER, C. E., 

An Engineer in Switzerland. 

HORACE E. HORTON, SR., 

President Chicago Bridge and Iron Co., Chicago, 111. 
Bridge and Water Tower Constructor. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 143 

DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 

The work of the Division of Engineering of the College is 
apportioned among four departments, viz.: 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering. 
The Department of Civil Engineering. 
The Department of Electrical Engineering. 
The Department of Mining Engineering. 

Through these departments the College offers systematic 
courses in Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical 
Engineering and Mining Engineering, each leading to its appro- 
priate degree. 

These several courses are planned with a view to fitting those 
pursuing them to enter professional engineering work and to 
advance therein more rapidly than would be possible without the 
preparation furnished by a College course. Experience shows 
that the graduates from technical schools generally excel in their 
chosen lines and it is worthy of note in this connection that rail- 
roads, manufacturers and other corporations, as well as munici- 
palities and government departments, are today demanding that 
those who seek promotion in their technical departments shall 
have secured a technical training such as can now be obtained in 
the engineering schools of the country. 

It is very manifest, because of the lack of time in the course, 
the multiplicity of general subjects which must be emphasized 
and the lack of uniformity of details in the profession due to the 
local and personal differences which exist in the conduct of engin- 
eering work of all kinds, that no college course in engineering 
can give to a student the training and experience in all the details 
of his profession. Moreover it seldom happens that a student in 
college knows definitely what specific branch of his chosen pro- 
fession he will follow and it would be folly for him to spend his 
time on details which he may never use. A thorough education in 
the branches of pure and applied science which are related to 
professional work is essential. Having this the engineer readily 
acquires familiarity with the details of his work. Without it no 
amount of experience with details alone can give an engineer high 
rank in his profession. 

Therefore it is believed that a college course in engineering 
should be in the first place a training of the mind of the student 
toward ability to think logically, to observe accurately and by the 



144 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

application of the former acquirement to the latter to reach cor- 
rect inferences; in the second place such a course should acquaint 
the student with approved methods of draughting and computing, 
with the use and limits of the instruments employed in the every 
day work of his profession and should give him an opportunity 
for experimental work bearing upon engineering problems; in the 
third place such a course should provide that the student acquire 
the art of expressing himself, publicly and privately, in good Eng- 
lish and should furnish him with some knowledge of the history of 
his own and preceding times, thus equipping him to be an orna- 
ment to his profession, and an enlightened member of society. 

In accordance with the views above expressed the engineering 
courses of this college include a variety of studies. These may be 
conveniently grouped as culture studies, training or disciplinary 
studies, professional studies, and practical work. 

CULTURE STUDIES. 

Two years' work in modern languages, (French or German) 
three years' work in English, culminating in seminar work, two 
years' work in history required and one year elective, and econ- 
omic science are found in all courses. 

The French or German serves the double purpose of giving 
access to foreign technical literature and of aiding the work in 
English. History and economic science cultivate interest in man- 
kind at large and are thus broadening to the student. 

If possible the amount of time devoted to culture studies 
would be increased, because it is believed that the engineering 
graduate profits by the time spent in general study almost as 
much as by that devoted to the professional studies. 

TRAINING STUDIES. 

Mathematics and physics constitute the backbone of engineer- 
ing and of the engineer because by their study are secured habits 
of logical thinking and a knowledge of the fundamental principles 
of matter — the laws of nature. 

Mathematics. — The study of Mathematics begins in the Aca- 
demic Year and extends through the Sophomore Year. 

Advanced Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, Plane Trigo- 
nometry, Analytical Geometry and Calculus are included in this 
course. 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 145 

ArrEiED Mathematics, e. g., analytical mechanics and hy- 
draulics are studied in the Junior and Senior Years. 

Physics. — The course in Physics is begun in the Sophomore 
Year. The ground of mechanics, heat, light, and sound is very 
thoroughly covered. In the Junior Year the subject of electricity 
and magnetism is introduced and the engineering student begins 
elementary laboratory work in physical measurements. 

Students in mechanical engineering and electrical engineer- 
ing continue work in physics in the Senior Year. 

Chemistry. — Chemistry is also a training study, especially 
in laboratory work, where habits of observing and recording facts 
are thoroughly instilled. The study also serves as a preparation 
for the study of the materials of engineering and other profes- 
sional studies. With the increase in the application of both chem- 
istry and engineering to the arts, as in electrolytic treatment of 
ores, the refining of metals, the manufacture of cement and in 
many other industrial operations, the subject of chemistry has 
an important place in the training of engineers. 

The study of chemistry is pursued in the first and second 
terms of the Sophomore Year of this course. 

The text book work extends through the year and parallel 
thereto is a course in laboratory work, wherein the student be- 
comes familiar with the general laboratory methods for a qualita- 
tive analysis. 

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES AND PRACTICAL WORK. 

Considerable time in the Junior and Senior Years is given by 
all engineering students to work having practical bearing on their 
profession; the object being to correlate, in some measure, theory 
and practice. 

Draughting, shop work and field work are begun upon en- 
trance and continued in proper proportions throughout the sev- 
eral courses. By their means students are frequently able to ob- 
tain valuable practical experience during their vacations and are 
thereby, in turn, benefited by being able to see the usefulness of 
their college work more clearly than before. 

By such vacation work the student is placed in a measure, in 
the position of the so called practical engineer, who, if he be hon- 

with himself, wishes for the advantages of a technical educa- 
:ion. 

10 



146 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

In the professional studies the student, through his teachers, 
text books, and actual practice gets into touch with the problems 
which the engineers of the day are trying to solve, and thus 
learns to appreciate the difficulties which confront them. 

The professional and practical studies culminate in the grad- 
uation thesis in which the student is expected to show energy, 
determination, resourcefulness and discrimination in the solution 
of a problem whose solution will add something to the store of 
engineering knowledge. 

A certain amount of undergraduate work and a large amount 
of graduate work as well as the research work carried on by the 
individual members of the engineering faculty is devoted to the 
various industrial interests of the state. 

Advanced students are given an opportunity to assist in all 
research or commercial work which is being conducted by the 
engineering departments. 

RELATION OF THE IOWA STATE COLLEGE TO THE INDUS- 
TRIAL INTERESTS OF THE STATE. 

While the principal business of the several engineering de- 
partments of the college is undoubtedly to give instruction to 
their students, the fact is recognized that the state contributes 
largely to the financial support of the College and that in return, 
not only should the College give tuition to the children of Iowa, 
but it should contribute as much as possible to the successful 
carrying on of the industrial interests of the state. By the estab- 
lishment of experiment stations the national government has 
recognized the duty of the land grant colleges to the agricultural 
interests. The engineering departments of this College believe 
that it is their proper business to aid the other industrial enter- 
prises of the state. 

With this thought as the motive, the several engineering de- 
partments have undertaken during the past ten years and will 
continue in the future to undertake to carry on investigations ol 
interest and value to the industries of Iowa, as need therefoi 
may arise, in so far as the funds available will permit. 

Up to the present time much has been done along the line; 
of sewage disposal and other phases of sanitary engineering, o 
clay working and coal mining, of electric lighting and telephon 
work, of gypsum and other mineral deposits and of power genei 
ation and transmission. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 147 

The results of these investigations are published in special 
bulletins, in the technical press, and in The Iowa Engineer, a 
quarterly magazine published by the College. 

While Iowa is primarily an agricultural state, the needs of 
modern life prompt to the development to the full of all natural 
resources and the Division of Engineering wishes to aid in every 
way in this development. 

Owing to the lack of funds, the aid thus freely offered is lim- 
ited somewhat. It is hoped that this limitation can be removed in 
the not distant future and that the College will have as a feature 
of its work an engineering experiment station. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. 

The buildings occupied exclusively by the Division of Engin- 
eering are the Engineering Hall, the Engineering Laboratory, the 
Power Station, the Forge Shop and Foundry, the Pattern Shop 
and Locomotive Laboratory. 

Engineering Hall. This building, completed for occupancy 
at the opening of the spring term, 1903, is a fire proof building, 
four stories in height, having a frontage of 208 feet, a depth of 
70 feet, with a semicircular wing at back, three stories in height. 

The architecture is classic in treatment. The exterior is Bed- 
ford stone with plate glass windows. The interior is finished in 
pressed brick and enameled brick in corridors and lavatories. 

The building is heated and ventilated by the hot blast system 
with automatic regulation, is electric lighted and equipped with 
modern plumbing. 

On the first floor are located the dynamo laboratory, work- 
shop and special laboratories of the department of electrical en- 
gineering, the cement laboratories of the department of civil en- 
gineering, the metallurgical laboratory of the department of min- 
ing engineering, and research rooms of the department of mechan- 
ical engineering. Also public lavatories for men and women. The 
corridor of this floor is furnished with 400 lockers for students. 

On the second and third floors are respectively the offices of 
the departments of mechanical engineering and electrical engin- 
eering, and of the departments of Civil Engineering and Mining 
Engineering. On the second floor is the general assembly room, 
seating 300, two lecture rooms of the department of Mechanical 
Engineering, two laboratories for electrical engineering and in- 



148 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

strument and cabinet rooms of the department of electrical en- 
gineering. 

On the third floor are class, draughting and seminar rooms of 
the department of civil engineering, class and seminar rooms and 
museum of the department of mining engineering, a general 
engineering museum and a faculty room. 

On the fourth floor are two draughting rooms and office of the 
department of mechanical engineering, draughting and instru- 
ment rooms of the department of civil engineering and photo- 
graphic and blue-print rooms for the joint use of all departments. 

The heating and ventilating apparatus is located in the base- 
ment, steam therefor being supplied through a tunnel communi- 
cating with the Power House. 

The interior finish is light antique oak and the furniture is 
golden oak. Ample blackboards, convenient and comfortable fur- 
niture and furnishings are provided for the needs of the several 
departments. 

Engineering Laboratory. This building, formerly the prin- 
cipal engineering building and headquarters of the several de- 
partments, is now used for machine shop and engineering labor- 
atory purposes. The arrangement and equipment of this building 
are described at length in connection with the mechanical and 
civil engineering departments. 

Power Station. This is a one story brick building, 36x120, 
devoted to the lighting and pumping plants of the College, and 
to the heating plant for the engineering buildings. All of the 
equipment is used for purposes of instruction, as far as this 
does not interfere with its other uses. The building contains an 
engine and dynamo room, a boiler room and a pump room. 

Forge Shop and Foundry. This is a one story brick building 
38x78 feet, containing the equipment for instruction in forge shop 
and foundry practice. The roof trusses are of steel and calculated 
to carry traveling cranes for transfering heavy castings and 
forgings. 

Pattern Shop. This is a one story brick building, 38x120 feet, 
devoted to the work of instruction in bench work, wood turning 
and pattern work. A fire proof room is provided for the storage 
of patterns. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 149 

Locomotive Laboratory. For the temporary protection of the 
locomotive donated to the Department of Mechanical Engineering 
by the Chicago & Northwestern railway, a corrugated iron struc- 
ture has been provided. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, PROFESSOR. 
W. H. MEEKER, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR. 
IIEREERT W. DOW, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 
T. LENNOX, E. C. POTTER, J. A. KNESCIIE, W. M. WILSON AND M. P. 

CLEGHORN, INSTRUCTORS. 
R. E. PESHAK, H. OTIS AND T. R. AGG, ASSISTANTS) M. L KING, 

STUDENT ASSISTANT. 

The headquarters of this department are in Engineering Hall. 
The principal offices are on the second floor. On the same floor 
are a lecture room and a combination class and drawing room. 
On the first floor are two rooms devoted to research work in 
mechanical engineering. On the fourth floor are two draughting 
rooms accommodating 200 students at one time, fitted with com- 
bination drawing tables, instrument cabinets and boards, whereby 
600 students can be assigned to mechanical drawing and design- 
ing in the department. In conjunction with these rooms is a com- 
modious office for the instructing staff in drawing. In addition 
the department has a common interest in and use of a photo- 
graphic room, a blue print room on the fourth floor, the engin- 
eering museum, and faculty room on the third floor and the as- 
sembly room on the second floor. 

The draughting and class and lecture rooms are equipped 
with ample blackboard space and the offices are fitted with the 
most convenient furniture for efficient and comfortable adminis- 
tration of the interests of the department. 

In addition to the above space in the new Engineering Hall, 
the department occupies the old Engineering Hall, the Power 
House, the Forge and Foundry, the Pattern Shop and the Locomo- 
tive Laboratory. 

In the old Engineering Hall the basement is used as a hy- 
draulic laboratory conjointly with the Department of Civil Engin- 
eering, the first floor is used as a machine shop, the second floor 



150 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

as an engineering laboratory and the third floor as free hand 
drawing rooms. 

SHOP WORK. 

Students in mechanical engineering pursue the full course in 
shop work, which consists of eight hours per week for three and 
one-half years. Partial courses are given to the students in the 
mining and electrical engineering courses. 

The system of instruction in the several shops begins with 
graded exercises calculated to familiarize the student with tools 
and with the materials used. The exercises are supplanted as 
soon as possible by work on machines or parts thereof which are 
to be put into actual use. By this arrangement greater interest 
is maintained in the work than would be possible with a strict 
adherence to the exercise system. The object of the shop work 
is not to teach trades, but to acquaint the student with the tools, 
materials and difficulties of shop practice and to establish in the 
mind principles which will aid him in designing and construction 
work in the other studies of his course and in his professional 
career. 

The machine shops are equipped with a twenty-four by twen- 
ty-four inch planer, a milling machine, a universal grinding ma- 
chine, a shaper, a drill press, two emery grinders, a polishing 
wheel, a power hack saw, a cutting off machine, eight engine 
lathes of capacities from ten to twenty inch swing and three to 
ten feet between centers, and three speed and drilling lathes to- 
gether with the usual assortment of small tools in the tool room. 
Power is furnished to this shop by an electric motor. 

The pattern shop is a brick building, one story high with 
spacious attic for storage of lumber. The building is one hundred 
and twenty-eight feet long by thirty feet wide. A tool room 
twelve by twenty feet is screened off in the center. A fire proof 
room is provided for patterns. The equipment of the pattern shop 
consists of a universal buzz saw, a mortising machine, planer, 
buzz planer, band saw, jig saw, grindstone, fifteen turning lathes, 
benches for twenty students, twenty-four complete sets of small 
tools and a number of special tools. Power for this building is 
furnished by a twenty horse power electric motor. 

The forge and foundry equipment are housed under one roof 
in a brick building seventy-eight by thirty-eight feet. A steel 
truss roof structure of substantial construction provides support 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 151 

for an overhead traveling crane, which serves the whole floor for 
handling heavy ladles, castings and forgings. Twelve forges, an 
oil burning annealing and tempering furnace, donated by the 
Rockwell Engineering Co., with blower and exhaust fan, drill 
press, vises, anvils, grindstone and small tools, such as sledges, 
fullers and swages, constitute the equipment for forge work. 

A cupola and blower for melting cast iron, a brass furnace, a 
core oven, core benches, twelve sets of moulder's tools, crucibles 
and a large assortment of flasks are used for foundry work. An 
electric motor supplies power for the forge and foundry. 

Students are advised to work in outside shops during their 
vacations. Experience obtained in this way may be credited in 
the shop work required in the regular course. 

DRAWING. 

The drawing room work begins with free hand drawing and 
object drawing, and is followed successively by machine sketch- 
ing, mechanical, kinematic drawing and designing. The latter 
division occupies the last two years of the course. 

The object sought by the drawing room course is to enable 
the student to make, as quickly as possible, neat and accurate 
working drawings, to design, in general and in detail, machines or 
parts thereof, and to apply throughout his knowledge of shop 
methods and his theoretical information acquired in the labora- 
tory and class room. 

The free hand drawing room is equipped with tables, models 
and machine parts for giving instruction to students in sections 
of fifty. 

The two large drawing rooms on the fourth floor of Engin- 
eering Hall and a part of the combination drawing and class room 
on the second floor of the same building are equipped with fifty 
combination drawing tables, each accommodating four students 
at once. The drawing boards are placed in frames adjustable 
as to height and angle and equipped with parallel rulers. Each 
unit has twelve drawers which are assigned to students for their 
drawing instruments and supplies. 

Extra drawing boards are supplied so that each place can be 
used by more than one student at different periods. 

An extensive collection of blue-prints, photographs, drawings 
and trade catalogues, as well as machines and parts thereof, con- 



152 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



stitute an important part of the working equipment in this branch 
of the work. 

EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING. 

Experimental work begins with the Junior Year and extends 
to the end of the course. The instruction in this work is thor- 
ough, its scope being indicated by the following list of experi- 
ments : 

Tensile, transverse and compression tests of materials, prop- 
erties and lubricants, measurements of power by absorption and 
transmission dynamoters, steam guage and indicator spring cali- 
bration, flue gas analysis, indicator practice, variation of engine 
speed, fan-blower tests, calorimetry, including throttling and sep- 
arating calorimeters, weir and water meter calibration, efficiency 
tests of steam engines, boilers, injectors, and steam heating, elec- 
tric- lighting, refrigerating, power and pumping plants, and ther- 
mal analysis of the steam engine, coal calorimetry, besides a num- 
ber of special experiments in the line of investigation. Tests on 
power plants outside of the College are made as frequently as 
possible. The engineering laboratory work usually culminates in 
the thesis, which is an exhaustive investigation of a limited sub- 
ject. From four to five hundred hours of actual time are spent on 
thesis by students in the engineering courses. 

The power house contains the complete electric light and 
power and pumping plants of the College, all of which is avail- 
able for experimental work, and constitutes a part of the engin- 
eering laboratory equipment of the engineering departments of 
the College. In the power house are a 100-H. P. Scotch boiler, a 
51-H. P. Babcock & Wilcox boiler, and a 264-H. P. Cahall horizon- 
tal water tube boiler, a 75-H. P. Straight Line engine, a 50-H. P. 
Ball engine, a 40-H. P. Buckeye engine, and a 35-H. P. Ideal 
engine, with five dynamos alternating and direct current from 15 
to 60 kilowatt capacity. In addition to the above the engineering 
laboratory equipment of the department consists of a twelve horse 
power Otto gasoline engine, a five horse power Lennox gasoline 
engine, a Wheeler condenser, three Worthington and three other 
water meters, a Pelton water motor, a Holly duplex pump, a 
Morris Machine Works centrifugal pump, injectors, weir and 
weighing tanks, gas meters, a Crosby steam guage tester, fan 
blowers for experimental work, Westinghouse and New York 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 153 

air pumps, a 100,000 pound Riehle testing machine with Gray 
autographic device, a 50,000 pound Olsen testing machine, an 
Olsen torsion testing machine, a Thurston oil tester, a complete 
De La Vergne refrigerating machine, gas and air analysis appar- 
atus, anemometer, two Thompson, two Crosby and one Richards 
indicators, dynamometers, a Prony brake, Parr coal calorimeter, 
platform scales and other apparatus essential and necessary to 
experimental engineering. 

A Hydraulic Laboratory has been fitted up in the basement 
of Old Engineering Hall. Water is supplied by about 700 feet of 
8 inch and 10 inch cast iron pipe from the College elevated tank, 
of 163,000 gallons capacity. The available head is about 150 feet. 
Arrangements are made for measuring the loss of head from 
friction in the supply pipe and in its special castings. In the 
laboratory a tank is provided 50 feet long by 6 feet wide and 4 
feet deep, which is used as a measuring and discharging tank for 
various pieces of apparatus, and which can also be used for exper- 
iments on the resistance of models to propulsion. The water is 
removed from this tank by two sewers; one 6 inches and the 
other 15 inches in diameter. These are arranged to be used for 
experiments on the laws of flow in sewer pipes. The laboratory is 
also provided with pipes of different sizes so arranged that 
measurements of the friction losses in these pipes and in their 
firrings can be made. Additional apparatus in the nature of hy- 
draulic motors, pumps of various types, and apparatus for exper- 
iments with orifices is being provided. 

Locomotive. The Chicago & Northwestern railway has pre- 
sented to the department an eight-wheel passenger locomotive 
and tender complete with attachments. The locomotive will be 
mounted for experimental work and will be a valuable addition 
to the laboratory equipment. 

The principal dimensions of the locomotive are as follows: 

Cylinder, 16x24 inches. 

Drivers, diameter, 63 inches. 

Driving wheel base, 7 feet, 3 inches. 

Total engine wheel base, 21 feet, 3 inches. 

Total engine and tender wheel base, 42 feet, 3 inches. 

Total weight of engine, 70,000 pounds. 

Weight on drivers 40,000 pounds. 



154 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

CLASS ROOM WORK. 

In the class room the work is carried on by means of recita 
tion and lectures, a text book and recitations being used wherever 
practicable; it is necessary, however, to present much material 
not found in text books, and in such cases recourse is had to the 
lecture system. Free use is made of the projection lantern and 
models. 

INSPECTION TRIPS. 

Once each year or oftener visits of inspection are made by the 
Senior class to power and manufacturing plants in Chicago and 
other large centers. These prove of great value to all. 

NON-RESIDENT LECTURES. 

Lectures by men in active engineering work are introduced 
from time to time and serve to add interest to the College work 
by bringing students and teachers in contact with the outside 
fields of engineering application. 

THESIS. 

So far as possible the graduating thesis is directed along 
lines which will produce results directly useful to the industrial 
interests of the State of Iowa, but this object is not furthered to 
the detriment of the student's interest to whom the thesis must 
be first of all an opportunity to think for himself and to apply 
principles previously inculcated in the regular course of his 
studies. 

Some recent theses in mechanical engineering are entitled: 
Calorimetric Tests of Iowa Fuels. 
Properties of Lubricants on the Iowa Market. 
Effect of Height of Chimney on Rate of Combustion of Iowa Fuels. 
Test of Heating and Ventilating Plant of the Engineering Hall. 
Cost of Electric Street Lighting. 
Recovery of Cylinder Oil from Exhaust Steam. 
Test of an Air Lift Pump. 

FEES. 

All students taking shop work or engineering laboratory are 
required to pay a fee to defray the cost of materials, power, and 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 155 

breakage. The amount is specified in the description of the courses 
of study. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AT AMES AND THROUGHOUT 

THE STATE. 

It is the desire of the department to be of all possible service 
to owners and operators of power stations for heat, light and 
power, of machine shops and of manufacturing plants in any line. 

To this end correspondence is invited relating to problems on 
mechanical engineering lines and whenever inquiries by letter or 
in person indicate a need for investigation demanding the tech- 
nical skill and equipment of the department the same will be 
undertaken if possible and the results furnished to all interested. 

COURSES OP STUDY. 

The following courses of study are given by the Department 
of Mechanical Engineering: 

Course I. — Analytical Mechanics. — Four resitations per week, 
first term, Junior Year. Dynamics and Graphical statics. Pro- 
fessor Meeker and Mr. Wilson. Text-book, Mechanics of Engin- 
eering, Church. Physics III and IV and Mathematics IX are 
prerequisites. 

Course II. — Analytical Mechanics. — Four recitations per 
week, second term, Junior Year. Strength of Materials. Profes- 
sor Meeker and Mr. Wilson. Text-book same as for Course I. 
Course I is a prerequisite. 

Course III. — Materials of Construction. — Three recitations 
per week, second term, Junior Year. Professor Meeker. Text- 
book, Materials of Construction, Johnson. Course XII and 
Chemistry III and VI are prerequisites. 

Course IV. — Steam Engine. — Three lectures or recitations per 
week, second term, Junior Year. Theory and practical application 
thereof to the steam engine and other heat engines. Professor 
Dow. Text-book, The Steam Engine and Other Heat Engines, 
Ewing. Course XII, Physics III and IV and Mathematics IX are 
prerequisites. 

Course V. — Machine Design. — Three lectures per week, first 
term, Junior Year. Elements of machine design. Professor 
Bissell. Text-book, Elements of Machine Design, A. W. Smith. 
Simultaneous work in Courses I, XII and XXIV required. 



156 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 






Course VI. — Hydraulics. — Four recitations per week, first 
term, Senior Year. Professor Meeker. Text-book, same as for 
Course I. Courses I and II are prerequisites. 

Course VII. — Steam Engine Design. — Three lectures per 
week, first term, Senior Year. A study of the principles involved 
in proportioning the cylinder dimensions of simple, compound 
and triple expansion engines and in the designing of fly-wheels, 
governors, valve-gears, engine shafts, etc. Professor Dow. 
Courses I, II, III and IV are prerequisites. 

Course VIII. — Specifications and Contracts. — One lecture or 
recitation per week, first term, Senior Year. Professor Bissell. 
Text-book, Engineering Contracts and Specifications, Johnson. 

Course IX. — Constructive Engineering. — Three lectures per 
week, second term, Senior Year. Principles of design and con- 
struction of heating, refrigerating, power, lighting and pumping 
plants in general and detail. Professor Bissell. Courses I, II, 
IV and XII are prerequisites. 

Course X. — Thesis. — The equivalent of one hour per week, 
first term, Senior Year, and 

Course XI. — Thesis. — The equivalent of five hours per week, 
second term, Senior Year, devoted to special work on an assigned 
topic. Professor Bissell. The thesis can be undertaken only by 
those students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering who 
have completed the prescribed course in Mechanical Engineering 
to the end of the Junior Year. The expenses of the thesis are 
adjusted by special arrangement in each case. 

Course XII. — Engineering Laboratory. — One half day, first 
term, Junior Year, and 

Course XIII. — Engineering Laboratory. — One half day per 
week, second term, Junior Year. Properties of materials, cali- 
bration of instruments, valve setting, indicator practice and 
efficiency tests of simple machines. Professor Meeker and Mr. 
Cleghorn. Text-book, Experimental Engineering. Carpenter. 
Physics II and IV and Chemistry III and VI are prerequisites. 
Fee, $3.00 for each course, XII and XIII. 

Course XIV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Two half days per 
week, first term, Senior Year, and 

Course XV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Two half days per 
week, second term, Senior Year. Efficiency test of stationary, 
and locomotive steam engines, gasoline and hot-air en- 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 157 

gines, boilers, refrigerating machinery and complete plants. Pro- 
fessor Bissell. Courses IV, XII and XIII are prerequisites. Fee, 
$5.00 for each course, XIV and XV. 

Course XVI. — Seminar. — One hour per week, first term, and 

Course XVII. — Seminar. — One hour per week, second term, 
Junior and Senior Years for students in Mechanical Engineering. 
Written papers on assigned topics with discussions thereof. Pro- 
fessor Bissell. 

Course XVIII. — Steam Engineering. — One lecture per week, 
with examinations at intervals, on the elementary principles of 
construction and operation of steam engines, boilers and acces- 
sory apparatus. Professor Bissell. Required of Freshmen in 
Mechanical Engineering, second term. Elective to Academic 
students in engineering. 

Course XIX. — Free-Hand Drawing. — Four hours per week, 
first term, Academic Year. Use of pencil and pen in sketching 
from flat copies and from objects. Mr. Cleghorn. 

Course XX. — Free-Hand Drawing. — Four hours per week, 
second term, Academic Year. Free-hand isometric, perspective 
and mechanical drawing of and from machine parts. Mr. Cleg- 
horn. Course XIX or its equivalent is a prerequisite. 

Course XXI. — Mechanical Drawing. — Six hours per week, 
first term, Freshman Year. The use of drawing instruments and 
practice in lettering. Mr. Cleghorn. 

Course XXII. — Mechanical Drawing. — Six hours per week, 
first term, Sophomore Year. Working drawings, tracings and 
blue-prints of complete machines and their details. Professor 
Dow and Mr. Wilson. Courses XX and XXI are prerequisites. 

Course XXIII. — Kinematic Drawing. — One lecture and five 
hours drafting per week, second term, Sophomore Year. The 
relative motion of machine parts, including belting, gearing, 
cams and linkages. Professor Dow and Mr. Wilson. Course 
XXII is a prerequisite. 

Course XXIV. — Designing. — Six hours per week, first term, 
Junior Year, and 

Course XXV. — Designing. — Three hours per week, second 
term, Junior Year. Design of Steam Boilers. Text-book, Steam 
Boilers, Peabody and Miller. Also a study of the form, strength 
and proportions of the frames and moving parts of cranes and 
other machines, with detail drawings of same. Professor Dow. 
Text-book, Hand-book of Information, Cambria Steel Co. Courses 



158 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

XXII and XXIII are prerequisites and concurrent work in 
Courses I and II is required. 

Course XXVI. — Designing — Steam Engine. — Six hours per 
week, first term, Senior Year. Each student works out the 
design of a standard type of steam engine with especial attention 
to the design of the fly-wheel and governor for efficient speed 
regulation. Professor Dow. Text-book, Mechanical Engineers' 
Pocket Book, Kent. Course I, II, III, IV, XXIV and XXV are 
prerequisites and simultaneous work in Course VII is required. 

Course XXVII. — Designing. — Six hours per week, second 
term, Senior Year. The design of complete machines of different 
types, including punching machinery, machine tools, special and 
automatic machinery. Attention is given to methods of con- 
struction as influenced by cost and other conditions. Professor 
Dow. Courses I, II, III, IV and XXIV are prerequisites. 

Course XXVIII. — Mechanical Engineering. — Two lectures per 
week, second term, Junior Year. Mechanical Engineering prac- 
tice, shop construction, management and cut keeping. Professor 
Bissell. Courses V, XXIV and XXIX to XXXIII are prerequisites. 

Course XXIX. — Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
term. Bench work and wood turning. Mr. Potter and Mr. King. 
Fee, $5.00. 

Course XXX. — Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
term. Forge work, forging and welding iron and steel dressing 
and tempering tools. Mr. Knesche and Mr. Agg. Course XXIX 
is a prerequisite. Fee, $5.00. 

Course XXXI. — Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
term. Pattern work, making patterns and core boxes for iron 
and brass castings, with allowances for draft, shrinkage and 
finish. Mr. Potter and Mr. King. Courses XXIX and XXXII are 
prerequisites. Fee, $5.00. 

Course XXXII. — Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week, one 
term. Foundry work, moulding and casting in iron and brass, 
green and dry sand, cores, mixtures and alloys. Mr. Knesche 
and Mr. Agg. Fee, $5.00. 

Course XXXIII. — Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
term, 

Course XXXIV. — Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
term, 

Course XXXV. — Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
term. Machine shop. Use of hand and machine tools for work- 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



159 



ing iron, steel and brass, finishing and assembling of machines 
and parts thereof. Mr. Lennox and Mr. Otis. Courses XXIX, 
XXX, XXXI and XXXII are prerequisites. Fee, $5.00 for each 
course, XXXIII, XXXIV and XXXV. 

Course XXXVII. — Shop-Work. — Four hours per week for 
one term. Wood work. Mr. Potter and Mr. King. Open to 
students in the Division of Agriculture. Fee, $3.00. 

Course XXXVIII. — Shop-Work. — Four or eight hours per 
week for one term. Forge work. Mr. Knesche. Open to students 
in the Division of Agriculture. Fee, $3.00. 

Course XL. — Dairy Machinery.— One lecture per week first 
term. Open to students in the Division of Agriculture. 

Course XLII. — Wood Carving. — Three hours per week. Mr. 
Potter. Elective for Juniors and Seniors in General and Domes- 
tic Science. Spring Term. Fee, $2.00. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, 4 
French, 3, 
German, 3 
Elocution, 2 
Drawing, 2 



or 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, XV.) 

(History, XV.) 

(Language, X.) 

(Language, XII.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5 

Plane Geometry, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 

French, 3, or 

German, 3 

History, 2 

Drawing, 2 

*Steam Engineering, 1 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(English, II.) 

(Languages, XL) 

(Languages, XIII.) 

(History, XVI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XVIII.) 



♦Elective upon consultation with Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



160 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Algebra, 5 
*French, 5, or 
*German, 5 
Advanced Rhetoric, 5 
Shop-Work, 2 
Mechanical Drawing, 2 
History, Formative Periods, 
Military Drill, 2 
Library Work, 4 hours 



(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(English, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

1 (History, XVII.) 

(Military, I.) 
(Library I.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5 
*French, 5, or 
*German, 5 
Composition, 1 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Languages, VIII.) 

(English, IV.) 



Descriptive Geometry, 5 (Civil Engineering, IV.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX or XXXII.) 

Steam Engineering, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVIII.) 

History, The American Nation, 1 (History, XVIII.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, II.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, VIII.) 

Physics, 5 (Physics, III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, III.) 
Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX, XXXI, or XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

Composition 1 (English, V.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, III.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Calculus, 5 
Physics, 5 
Chemistry, 5 



(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Physics, IV.) 

(Chemistry, VI.) 



^Beginning September, 1904, Freshman French or German will be second 
year work. Students entering the Freshman year, September, 1903, with 
credits for first year German will be required to take second year work in the 
same languages. Students entering the Freshman year, September, 1903, with- 
out previous work in French or German, will be required to take first year 
work only. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



161 



Shop-work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX, XXXI, or XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIII.) 

Composition, 1 (English, VI.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, IV.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 

Political Economy, 5 

Electricity and Magnetism, 3 

Machine Design, 3 

Physical Laboratory, 1 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 

Designing, 2 

Shop-Work, 2 

Seminar, 1 

♦Debating, 1 

*History, XlXth Century, 2 



(Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Physics, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, V.) 

(Physics, XIVA.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XVI.) 

(English, VII.) 

(History, VII.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 
Materials of Construction, 3 
Dynamo Electric Machinery, 
Mechanical Engineering, 2 
Physical Laboratory, 2 
Engineering Laboratory, 1 
Designing, 1 
Steam Engine, 3 
Shop-Work, 2 
Seminar, 1 
♦Debating, 1 
"History, XlXth Century, 1 



(Mechanical Engineering, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

2 (Physics, X.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXVIII.) 

(Physics, XVII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXIV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XVII.) 

(English, VIII.) 

(History, VIII.) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Steam Engine Design, 3 
Hydraulics, 4 
Designing, 2 

Engineering Laboratory, 2 
3hop-Work, 2 



(Mechanical Engineering, VII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXVI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXV.) 



♦Elective on consultation with the Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



ii 



162 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Physical Laboratory, 2 (Physics, XX.) 

Specifications and Contracts, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, VIII.) 

Seminar, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVI.) 

Thesis, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, X.) 

♦History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VII.) 

SECOND TEEM. 

Constructive Engineering, 3 (Mechanical Engineering, IX.) 

Hydraulic Engineering, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXII.) 

**Electrical Engineering, 2 (Electrical Engineering, XXXII.) 

Designing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXVII.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XV.) 

Seminar, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVII.) 

Thesis, 5 (Mechanical Engineering, XI.) 

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

ANSON MARSTON, PROFESSOR. 

L. E. ASHBAUGH, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

ELMINA T. WILSON, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

J. E. STEWART, ASSISTANT. 






The Department of Civil Engineering has its headquarters 
in new Engineering Hall. The offices of the Department occupy 
rooms 311, 315 and 316 in the third story of the building. In 
addition, the Department has two large class-rooms and a com- 
bination drawing-room and class-room in the third story of the 
building, a large drawing-room 40 feet by 70 feet in the fourth 
story and an ample sized instrument room in the fourth story, 
besides a cement laboratory and a masonry laboratory in the first 
story. The Department also has the use, in common with the 
other Engineering Departments, of the photographic and blue 
print rooms in the fourth story, the large Engineering Museum in 
the third story, and the large Assembly Room in the second story. 
All of these rooms are finely furnished and equipped throughout. 

In connection with the offices provision is made for the 
systematizing of all the work of the Department, and card indexes 
for correspondence, equipment, and for general engineering lit- 
erature are provided. 

In addition to the space occupied in the new Engineering Hall 
part of the equipment of the Department is placed in the old 



*Elective on consultation with the Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
**Beginning in the college year, 1904-5. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 163 

Engineering Building. Here are lcated the hydraulic laboratory 
and most of the apparatus for testing the materials of construc- 
tion. In these lines of work the Departments of Civil Engineer- 
ing and Mechanical Engineering co-operate. 

The Instrumental Equipment is nearly all kept in room 409 
on the fourth floor where suitable cases and racks are provided 
for storing it in a systematic way. The instrumental equipment 
includes seven complete engineer's transits, one plain transit, one 
astronomical transit, one plane table, one surveyor's compass, one 
railroad compass, one solar compass, six traverse tables, four 
engineer's levels, and numerous chains, tapes, rods, etc. The 
Department is also well supplied with minor instruments such 
as drawing instruments, clinometers, computing machines, plani- 
meter, hand levels, etc. This equipment is being constantly added 
to from yearly appropriations. 

In giving out the instruments for the field work in the Civil 
Engineering course the captain of each field party signs a receipt 
for all apparatus taken out, and upon return of the same these 
receipts are cancelled and kept on file. Students are required to 
return all apparatus in as good condition as when taken out. 

Although the instrument room is located on the fourth floor 
of the building an electric elevator is provided, landing within a 
few steps of the door of the room, which makes access to the 
apparatus convenient. 

The Cement Laboratory is located in the first 3tory, occupying 
room 105. Stone topped tables are provided on three sides of 
this room on which the mixing and breaking of briquettes and 
similar work is done. On two sides of the room are provided 
tanks underneath these tables for the storage of briquettes. In- 
vestigations are constantly under way with cements and similar 
substances, so that ample storage room is required. Under the 
stone topped table on the other side of the room are provided 
cement bins for storing cement and standard sand 

A Fairbanks testing machine is used for breaking the bri- 
quettes. There is an ample supply of molds for making the 
briquettes and the usual apparatus is provided for testing sound- 
ness, fineness, and rate of setting. 

The Masonry Laboratory occupies room 106 of the first floor. 
This room is intended for the testing of building materials, es- 
pecially brick and stone. Laboratory tables are provided for 
microscopic work and other work in this line. Grinding appara- 
tus is arranged for preparing specimens for crushing and other 



164 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

tests and is separated from the rest of the room by a glass in- 
closure, the dust from within which is removed to the outside of 
the building through a flue. It is intended to place a large test- 
ing machine in this laboratory. 

The apparatus for freezing and thawing tests of brick and 
stone is also located here. 

The Hydraulic Laboratory is located in the basement of the 
old Engineering Building. The quarters here are not very suita- 
ble but it is intended to improve them as soon as possible. Water 
is supplied by about 700 feet of 8 inch and 10 inch cast iron pipe 
from the college elevated tank of 163,000 gallons capacity. The 
available head is about 150 feet. Arrangements are made for 
measuring the loss of head from friction in the supply pipe and 
in its special castings. In the laboratory a tank is provided 50 
feet long by 6 feet wide and 4 feet deep, which is used as a 
measuring and discharging tank for the various pieces of appara- 
tus. The water is removed from this tank by two sewers, one 
6 inches and the other 15 inches in diameter. These are arranged 
to be used in experiments on the laws of flow in sewer pipes. 
The laboratory is also provided with wrought iron pipes of dif- 
ferent sizes, so arranged that measurements of friction losses in 
these pipes and in their fittings can be made. Additional appara- 
tus in the nature of weirs, hydraulic motors and pumps of various 
types is provided. 

Laboratory Facilities for other tests of the materials of con- 
struction are provided for in connection with the Mechanical 
Engineering Department in the old Engineering Building. The 
Civil Engineering Department owns an abrasion testing machine 
and, jointly with the Mechanical Engineering Department, a 
100,000 pound Riehle testing machine. The Civil Engineering 
students also have the use of other testing machines belonging to 
the Mechanical Engineering Department. 

Standard Engineering Plans. — The Department has a large 
collection of blue print plans of bridges, roof trusses, buildings 
and similar structures, which have been kindly donated by the 
principal corporations engaged in structural engineering through- 
out the country. In a similar way, the principal railway com- 
panies of the country have donated standard plans of railway 
structures; and many plans and specifications of water works, 
sewer systems, and other engineering work are also to be found 
in the Department's collection of standard plans. This collec- 
tion is constantly being added to. It is arranged systematically 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 165 

in largo drawers, in filing cases provided in connection with the 
office equipment. In the general arrangement, plans relating to 
the same subject are kept in the same drawer. In addition, a 
card index is provided whereby any drawing in the collection can 
readily be found. 

The Engineering Museum on the third floor of the new En- 
gineering Hall, 60 feet in diameter, is intended for the joint use 
of all the Departments of Engineering. This room is completely 
supplied with museum cases, and space is provided in which will 
be placed large models of engineering structures. The collection 
of specimens for this Museum is just beginning but the Civil 
Engineering Department has already a set of the full sized sec- 
tions of the wrought iron and steel commonly used in engineering 
structures and a collection of specimens of Iowa building brick, 
paving brick, building stone, and other building materials. The 
Museum collection will be extended as rapidly as possible. 

Water V/orks and Sewage Disposal Plant. — The Civil Engin- 
eering Department designed and supervised the construction of 
the college water-works. The College water tower is the largest 
in the west. It was designed with special reference to its architec- 
tural appearance and cuts of it have been published in the recent 
books treating of the design of such structures. The pumping 
machinery is so arranged that college students can readily make 
tests of the efficiency of the apparatus as part of the class work. 

The Civil Engineering Department has also designed and 
supervised the construction of the college sewage disposal system. 
This is the first purification plant installed in the state and has 
been very successful. 

The water works system and sewage disposal plant are util- 
ized, so far as possible, to furnish practical object lessons to the 
students in Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering. 

Experimental Investigations Helpful to State Interests. — In 
the general write-up for the Division of Engineering above will be 
found a description of the concerted work now being undertaken 
by the entire Division of Engineering in conducting investiga- 
tions helpful to the industrial interests of the state of Iowa and in 
making the results of these investigations known to the public. 
On this account the general discussion on this same object which 
has been given in the write-up of the Civil Engineering Depart- 
ment for several preceding years is now omitted, and in place of 
it mention will be made of the special lines of work in this con- 



166 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

nection finished or now being carried on by the Civil Engineering 
Department. 

One of the most important lines of work already carried out 
is the investigation of sewage disposal for Iowa. The college 
plant for this purpose was the first to be constructed in the state 
and has now been in successful operation for nearly five years. 
It has been visited by the authorities of many Iowa cities and has 
been completely successful in every respect It purifies an 
amount of sewage equal to the flow from the average Iowa town 
of from 2,500 to 3,000 people to such degree that the effluent is as 
clear, sparkling and odorless as the purest spring water. Many 
chemical and bacterial tests have shown it to be purer than the 
water in many wells which are used for drinking purposes. 
Special investigations are beginning this year on the subject of 
the proper methods of purifying creamery sewage. The Depart- 
ment is in receipt of many letters of inquiry from many cream- 
eries of the state regarding this point. An experimental plant 
for the separate treatment of the sewage from the College cream- 
ery has been installed to determine the best solution of the prob- 
lem. In connection with this work the Departments of Botany 
and Agricultural Chemistry have all along co-operated with th© 
Civil Engineering Department most cordially. 

The Department has also been making very extensive tests 
of the paving brick of the state. Thousands of brick have been 
tested and the results are now ready to compile for publication. 
In connection with this work the Department has co-operated with 
the State Engineering Society in investigating the brick paving 
of the state. The head of the Department has been Chairman of 
a Committee which has prepared an exhausive report relating 
to all the features of brick paving in Iowa. 

The Department has also made extensive tests of dry press 
brick used in the state with the result that an Iowa brick stood 
at the head of the list. A bulletin giving the results of another 
series of tests of the common brick of the state is now ready for 
distribution. 

The Department has also made tests of Iowa gypsum in con- 
parison with similar materials from other states, and of Iowa 
building stone. 

The Department calls the attention of the clay workers, 
quarry owners, municipal officers, officers of corporations engaged 
in transportation or manufacturing, and of all others having 
to deal with the materials of construction, to the facilities afford- 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 167 

ed in its laboratories for making tests of such materials. Such 
work will be done for citizens of the state at the lowest possible 
rate. It will pay all such persons to have the good quality of 
their cement, brick, or building stone, established by tests. The 
same is true of the steel for the bridges and water towers of the 
state. The facilities of the laboratories of the Civil Engineering 
Department are offered for such purposes. 

Another valuable field which has not been developed in Iowa 
is that of good roads. The Civil Engineering Department is now 
beginning good roads investigations. During the present year 
many data are being collected regarding the cost of transportation 
over country roads, and of the amount of traffic over them, with 
a view to determining the amounts of money which could eco- 
nomically be expended in improving the roads. Tests of the re- 
sistance to hauling on different kinds of road and under different 
conditions of weather are also being made. These investigations 
will be continued and extended. The character and cost of ma- 
terials available for making roads in different parts of the state 
will be studied, as also the best methods of road administration. 

Bulletins. — Five Bulletins have already been prepared relat- 
ing to sewage disposal and can be obtained on application. A 
Bulletin relating to tests of building brick is also ready for 
distribution, together with the Report on Brick Paving prepared 
by the Committee of the State Engineering Society. Additional 
Bulletins relating to all the lines of work of the Department will 
be published from time to time. 

As illustrating some of the recent lines of investigation work 
in the Department the titles of some of the Senior Theses for the 
present year are given as follows: 

"Investigations Relating to Good Roads in Iowa." 

"Statistics of Iowa Water-Works." 

"The Rate of Flow of Storm Water over Street and Lawn 
Surfaces." 

"A Magnetic Survey of Polk County." 

The Alumni of the Department. — The Civil Engineering De- 
partment of the Iowa State College is proud of the record made 
by is Alumni, in all branches of Civil Engineering, as shown by 
their eminence as engineers. They are to be found located in 
responsible positions throughout the country. The Department 
maintains an Alumni Directory and endeavors to keep in touch, 
so far as possible, with its graduates. It is often the case that 
the Department is able to be helpful to the Alumni by recommend- 



168 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ing them for positions. The Department receives more and more 
calls for men to fill good positions. Many of these calls come 
from the older Alumni themselves. 

Of recent years the demand upon the Department for men to 
fill good positions has continually been greater than the supply. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

One of the most eminent of American engineers has said, 
"The civil engineer of the new epoch must be an educated man. 
In no profession will this be more necessary." The work of the 
course of study in Civil Engineering has been arranged to give as 
thorough a training as practicable in those fundamental subjects, 
a knowledge of which must form the foundation of the equipment 
of the competent civil engineer. The work may be classified un- 
der the heads, Culture Studies, Mathematical Studies, Science 
Studies, and Professional Studies. 

Culture Studies include History, English, French or German, 
and Political Economy. Thorough work in English is especially 
necessary in the training of the engineer to enable him to express 
himself with the utmost clearness and conciseness, in his reports 
and in papers on technical subjects. No one can attain great 
success as an engineer who fails in these particulars. His suc- 
cess in carrying out projects upon which he is engaged will often 
depend upon his ability to convince his superiors or public offi- 
cials of the correctness of his views. The really successful en- 
gineer also must come in close contact with other members of his 
profession, and must exchange information of value with them 
through the medium of papers on technical subjects. For the 
attainment of these ends the engineer should give especial atten- 
tion to the thoroughness of his training in English. The work in 
English begins in the Academic year and continues to the end of 
the Sophomore year. Much training in the writing of essays is 
given, and the last three terms are devoted wholly to this kind of 
work, which is of special importance to the engineer. A course in 
debating is offered throughout the Junior year which all students 
who can do so are advised to elect. It is of importance to the 
engineer to be able to express himself creditably orally as well as 
in writing. The drill in English is continued to some extent 
throughout the Junior and Senior years by the work in the En- 
gineering Seminar, which requires careful preparation of papers 
on professional subjects. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 169 

The work in pure mathematics continues throughout the 
Academic, Freshman and Sophomore years, and includes instruc- 
tion in Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry and Calculus. Thorough 
preparation in mathematics is one of the most essential things in 
an engineer's education, and without it he can never pass beyond 
the mere workman stage in his profession. It is especially nec- 
essary that he should be able to apply his knowledge of mathe- 
matics with facility to the actual problems he encounters in his 
professional worK. Hence the instruction in mathematics is 
specially directed to giving facility in the solution of problems. 
The work in pure mathematics is supplemented in the Freshman 
year by a course in Descriptive Geometry, which gives the appli- 
cation of mathematics to draughting, and in the Junior and 
Senior years by thorough courses in Analytical Mechanics, 
Strength of Materials, and Hydraulics, which give the mathe- 
matical applications of physical laws to the designing of engin- 
eering structures and to the study of the laws of liquids. Prac- 
tical Astronomy is studied in the second term of the Senior year. 

The successful engineer must also be thoroughly familiar with 
the scientific principles relating to the laws and forces of nature 
which he must use in his professional work. Instruction in the 
physical sciences begins with Chemistry and Physics in the Soph- 
omore year. Geology is taught in the Senior year. The College 
laboratories are especially well fitted for giving training in scien- 
tific work. It is by a study of scientific subjects supplemented 
by laboratory work that the engineer becomes familiar with those 
sources of power in nature which it is his life work to direct for 
the use and convenience of man. 

For detailed information as to the nature of the professional 
work given in the course in Civil Engineering the reader is re- 
ferred to the statements regarding each specific subject under the 
head of "Courses" below. It may be said here in a general way 
that the instruction in Free-Hand Drawing begins in the Acad- 
emic year. Mechanical Drawing, Lettering, the use of Water 
Colors and Pen Topography are studied in the Freshman year. 
Shades and Shadows and Perspective are studied in the Sopho- 
more year. In the course of instruction in Drawing it is at- 
tempted to give the student such facility in drawing that he can 
do creditable work in an engineering draughting office. Especial 
attention is paid to the lettering of all drawing, both in the direct 
class work in Lettering, and in the finishing up of all other draw- 



170 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ings made in connection with his other professional work. The 
student is required to letter them plainly and neatly and to make 
finished plates. Throughout the Sophomore, Junior and Senior 
years the student has practice in the preparation of maps and 
of drawings and plans of various engineering structures. 

The work in Field Surveying practice begins in the Freshman 
year and continues for three years, seven hours per week for 
fourteen weeks of each term. The student serves in a subordin- 
ate position until he becomes familiar with the instruments and 
the work, and finally he has charge of a small party. He becomes 
familiar with land surveying, leveling, topographical surveying 
and railway surveying by actual work in the field. It is the aim 
of the course to give the student the facility in the handling of 
instruments and in the carrying out of operations in field survey- 
ing which can only be acquired by considerable practice. It is 
also attempted to give him as much experience as possible in the 
handling of small parties of men. Besides the above work stu- 
dents actually camp in the field for two weeks and a half in each 
of three summer vacations, and so become familiar with topo- 
graphical work on a more extended scale. In lieu of this summer 
surveying many students obtain remunerative work with engin- 
eers throughout the summer vacation. Such work, when properly 
certified to by the engineer under whom it is taken, is accepted in 
lieu of the summer camp surveying. Students are encouraged 
and urged to secure positions of this kind, as it not only assists 
them financially, but also is of great benefit to them in connec- 
tion with their professional training. 

A course of instruction in Land and Topographical Surveying 
runs throughout the Sophomore year and one in Railway Engin 
eering runs throughout the Junior year. 

Electric Railways and Power Transmission are also studh 
in the Junior year. 

Instruction in Roads and Pavements is given in the seconc 
term of the Senior year. Sanitary Engineering, Water Work 
Engineering, Bridge Engineering, and Masonry Structures an< 
Foundations are taught in the Senior year. For the details o 
each of these courses reference should be made to the informa 
tion given below under the specific course named. The designin; 
of engineering structures by the student begins in the second terr 
of the Junior year and continues throughout the Senior year. I 
this work the student actually designs roof trusses and stone an 



in 

■ 

iTIf 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 171 

steel truss bridges, preparing the working drawings. A course 
of actual practice in testing the various materials of construction 
in the Engineering Laboratory is given in the Junior and Senior 
years, and is of great value in familiarizing the student with 
methods of testing and with the properties of the materials of 
construction. 

A valuable part of the work of the course is not laid out on 
paper, but is gained by inspection of engineering work on the 
inspection tours arranged for the upper classmen. It is planned 
at least once a year to have the Junior and Senior students go 
on an inspection trip to some point where various engineering 
works can be inspected and their instructive features noted. In 
1901 the trip was to Chicago, and in 1902 to Minneapolis and St. 
Paul. 

Valuable instruction is also obtained by listening to lectures 
given by non-resident lecturers. Practicing engineers are invited 
to the College to give lectures to the engineering students upon the 
subjects in which they are experts. During the past year such a 
lecture has been given by Mr. Horace E. Horton, President of the 
Chicago Bridge and Iron Company, which does more work in the 
erection of steel water towers than any other company in the 
country. Another lecture was given to the engineering students 
by Mr. W. J. Karner, Assistant to the Chief Engineer of Construc- 
tion of the Illinois Central Railroad. Other lecturers the past 
year have been Mr. G. M. Davidson, Chemist and Engineer of 
Tests of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway and Mr. Maurice 
0. Eldredge, Assistant Director U. S. Road Inquiry Bureau. The 
other engineering departments also arrange for non-resident lec- 
turers. 

The work of the course finally culminates in the thesis, an 
original investigation carried on by the student to demonstrate 
his ability to do such work before he graduates. In the past 
large amounts of time have been devoted by students as a rule to 
this work, and it has often been the case that the results have 
been found worthy of publication. Each student should attempt 
to make his thesis one of the things of which he can justly be 
proud throughout the remainder of his professional career. 

The following courses of study are given by the Civil Engin- 
eering Department: 

Course I. — Lettering. — Three hours per week throughout the 
first term, Freshman Year. Text-book, Reinhardt's "Lettering for 
Draughtsmen, Engineers and Students." The work consists in 



172 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the preparation of practice plates of lettering and titles, and in 
actual practice in lettering and engineering drawings. Mr. Stew- 
art. 

Course II. — Field Work. — Seven hours per week for fourteer 
weeks during the first term, Freshman Year. See Course III 
Professor Ashbaugh and Mr. Stewart. 

Course III. — Field Work. — Seven hours per week for fourteer 
weeks during the second term, Freshman Year. In Courses I] f 
and III the men are assigned to do duty as chainmen, axemer 
and rodmen in the squads in Sophomore Surveying and Junio: 
Railway Surveying, of which Sophomores and Juniors hav< 
charge, besides serving as instrument men. Professor Ashbaugl 
and Mr. Stewart. 

NOTE. The work in Courses II and III is preparatory to the Field Work o 
the Sophomore and Junior years, which takes the same number of hours pe 
week each year. Thus the student has the training to be obtained by thre 
years' actual experience in the field. He begins in a subordinate position, bu 
for a part of the time he is in responsible charge of a small party. 

Couese IV. — Descriptive Geometry. — Three recitations am 
six hours drawing per week throughout the second term, Fresb 
man year. Text-book, MacCord's "Descriptive Geometry." Man; 
original problems are also solved in class and in the draughtini 
room. This course is open to students who have completet 
Mechanical Drawing, Plane Geometry, and second term Academi 
Algebra, and who are taking a simultaneous course in Soli« 
Geometry and Trigonometry. Professor Wilson, and Mr. Stewarl 

Course V. — Drawing. Tinting and Shading and Pen Tope 
graphy. — Six hours per week throughout the second term, Fresl 
man Year. The work consists in practice with water color 
(occupying about one-half of the total time), and of making pra( 
tice plates illustrating the use of topographical symbols, contour 
and hatchings, during the remainder of the time. This course i 
open to the students who have completed Free Hand Drawing 
Professor Wilson and Mr. Stewart. 

Course "VI. — Drawing. Shades and Shadows. — Three hour 
per week throughout the first term, Sophomore Year. Th 
drawing consists in the solution of problems, with various source 
of light, and is based on the principles of Descriptive Geometr: 
This course is open to students who have completed Course I\ 
Professor Wilson. 

Course VII. — Draioing. Perspective. — Three hours per wee 
throughout the second term, Sophomore Year. Text-book, La\> 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 173 

ence's "Principles of Perspective." The drawing consists partly 
n the solultion of problems and in sample exercises in Perspec- 
ive and partly in the preparation and architectural rendering of 
i perspective drawing of a building or engineering structure, 
rom the detailed plans. This course is open to students who 
lave completed Descriptive Geometry, Mechanical Drawing, and 
finting and Shading. Professor Wilson. 

Course VIII. — Surveying. — Two recitations and seven hours 
ield work per week throughout the first term, Sophomore Year, 
n the Civil Engineering course, and throughout the first term, 
'unior Year in the Agricultural course. Text-books, Johnson's 
'Theory and Practice of Surveying" and Elliott's "Engineering 
or Land Drainage." The topics treated in the class-room are the 
lse and care of surveying instruments, problems in surveying 
ncluding methods of calculating areas of tracts of land, the study 
)f the United States public land surveys with special reference 
o the restoration of lost or obliterated corners and sub-division 
)f sections, the best methods of doing field work and keeping 
lotes for the same, and the making of maps and profiles. 

The study of Drainage Surveying demands especial attention 
n this state and the course is adapted to such needs. The prin- 
•iples of the subject receive careful attention in the class room 
tnd are put into immediate practice in the survey of some part of 
he College farm or adjoining land where development by drain- 
ige is advisable. Plans for the drainage system and estimates 
)f cost complete this part of the work. 

The field work, which occupies seven hours each week for 
ourteen weeks, gives practice in the use and adjustment of sur- 
veying instruments, various methods of careful measurements 
vith tapes, and with transit and level, exact methods of triangula- 
ion, and the making of surveys for maps and profiles. The data 
lsed in the land survey practice are obtained from official records 
it the County Recorder's Office. The usual office work of making 
naps and profiles for surveys is carried out by each student. 
Frequent reference is made to the best engineering periodicals 
ind the students prepare abstracts of articles of interest as the 
:opics are studied in the class room. While the aim of this 
course is to hold rigidly to exact methods consistent with results 
required and to give the student a broad knowledge of principles 
Df surveying, at the same time he is taught to use the best 
methods employed in the best engineering offices that he may be 
ready to fall in line with his associates on entering his actual 



174 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

practice. This course is open to students who have completed 
Geometry and Plane Trigonometry. Professor Ashbaugh and 
Mr. Stewart. 

Coubse IX. — Surveying. — Two rectiations and seven hours 
field work per week throughout the second term, Sophomore Year. 
Text-book, Johnson's "Theory and Practice of Surevying." This 
is a continuation of Course VIII, the topics treated in the class 
room being Topographical Surveying, Hydrographic Surveying, 
Mining Surveying, City Surveying, and Geodetic Surveying. The 
field work, which occupies seven hours per week for fourteen 
weeks, continues the work of the first term, to which is added 
extensive practice in Topographical Surveying, including the 
construction of an accurate map from the survey notes. Professor 
Ashbaugh and Mr. Stewart. 

Couese X. — Railway Engineering. — Three recitations and 
seven hours field work per week throughout the first term, Junior 
Year. See Course XI. For one of the recitations three hours 
office work are substituted part of the term. Professor Marston 
and Mr. Stewart. 

Course XI. — Railway Engineering. — Three recitations and 
seven hours field work per week, throughout the second term, 
Junior Year. For one of the recitations three hours office work 
are substituted during part of the term. 

For Courses X and XI the text-books are Searle's "Field 
Engineering," Crandall's "Transition Cures," "Tratman's "Rail- 
way Track and Track Work," and Professor Marston's Notes. In 
the Notes, practical details of railroad location and construction 
are given, standard plans for railway structures are given and 
discussed, and the economic theory of railway location is treated 
at some length. In the text-books some of the topics are simple, 
the Notes, practical details of railroad location and construction 
of railways, track standards and maintenance, etc. In the field 
work a preliminary survey of about four miles of railway is made, 
from which a contour map is prepared. On this a "paper loca- 
tion" is laid down, after a careful study to determine the best 
route. This located line is then run in the field and cross sec- 
tioned. The grading is calculated, bills of material for culverts 
and bridges are made, bridges are staked out, and the cost of the 
line is estimated. This course is open to students who have com- 
pleted Geometry, Plane Trigonometry, and Courses VIII and IX. 
Professor Marston and Mr. Stewart. 

Course XII. — Roads and Pavements. — Two recitations per 









DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 175 

week throughout the second term, Senior Year, in the course in 
Civil Engineering. Text-book, Baker's "Roads and Pavements" 
and Tillson's "Pavements." Among the topics studied are the 
good roads problem, the best method of constructing country 
roads, city streets and grades, classes and methods of construc- 
tion of pavements, and the costs of roads and pavements. Pro- 
fessor Marston. 

Course XIII. — Roads and Pavements. — Two recitations 
throughout the second term, Junior Year in the course in Agricul- 
ture. Text-book, Baker's "Roads and Pavements.' The work is sim- 
ilar to that in Course XII except that during the latter part of the 
term less attention is paid to city pavements and in place of this 
the class will undertake field and office work in connection with 
road improvement such as making survey of road, preparing map 
and profile of improvement, staking out the work, and estimating 
the cost. Professor Marston. 

Course XIV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Six hours per week 
throughout the second term, Junior Year. Fee, $5.00. The work is 
done in the testing laboratories, and consists in making the vari- 
ous standard tests of the materials of construction, including 
cement, building stone, paving brick, wood, cast iron, wrought 
iron, and steel. This course is open to Juniors. Professor Wilson. 

Course XV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Three hours per 
week throughout the first term, Senior Year. Fee, $3. The work 
consists in experiments in the Hydraulic laboratory, such as gag- 
ing the flow of water over weirs, through orifices and in sewer 
pipes, measuring the friction in pipes, and testing the efficiency 
of pumps and hydraulic motors. This course is open to Seniors 
who are at the same time studying hydraulics. Professor Wilson. 

Course XVI. — Engineering Laboratory. — Three hours per 
week throughout the second term, Senior Year. Fee, $3.00. The 
work consists of special investigations in the hydraulic or testing 
laboratory on subjects selected after consultation with the in- 
structor. This course is open to students who have completed 
Courses XIV and XV. Professor Wilson. 

Course XVII. — Designing, Structural. — Two lecture hours 
and four hours designing per week throughout the second term, 
Junior Year. Text-book, Johnson's "Framed Structures." The 
work consists in actually designing one or more roof trusses or a 
plate girder bridge, including calculating the stresses, the sizes 
of the members and the riveting, and in preparing working plans, 
bills of material and estimates of weights. It is the aim of this 



176 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

course to give the student such practice in the use of the Standard 
hand books, methods of design, and the making of shop drawings, 
that he may be of some service in the drawing room of a bridge 
company during the summer vacation. Students are urged to 
secure such practice, when possible, during the vacation preceding 
the work of the Senior year. This course is open to students 
who have completed the first term Junior work in Analytical 
Mechanics, and are pursuing simultaneously the second term 
Junior work in the same subject. Professor Ashbaugh. 

Course XVIII. — Framed Structures. — Three recitations and 
six hours designing per week throughout the first term, Senior 
year. Text-book, Johnson's "Framed Structures." The work 
consists in the study of methods for computing the stresses and 
making the design of bridge and roof trusses and other framed 
structures. Many numerical problems are worked out in the 
class room and designs and shop drawings executed in the draw- 
ing room. Complete details of highway and railway bridges 
and other structures are made by each student, who makes his 
own calculations for stresses, proportioning the members, joint 
details, etc., finishing with the preparation of bill of material 
and the estimation of weights. This course is open to students 
who have completed Course XVII. Professor Ashbaugh. 

Couese XIX. — Framed Structures. — Four recitations and six 
hours designing per week, second term, Senior year. The work 
begun in Course XVIII is continued, the class work taking up the 
topics draw bridges, cantilevers, arches, steel buildings, and other 
framed structures. Professor Ashbaugh. 

Course XX. — Stereotomy. — Six hours per week throughout 
the first term, Senior Year. Text-book, Crandall's "Stereotomy." 
The work consists in actually designing a stone or brick and a 
concrete-steel arch bridge. This course is open to students who 
have completed Mechanics. Professor Marston. 

Course XXI. — Sanitary Engineering. — Three recitations per 
week throughout the first term, Senior Year. Text-book, Folwell's 
"Sewerage," and Professor Marston's Notes. The work consists 
in the study of the principles and methods involved in the design, 
construction and maintenance of sewerage systems. House 
plumbing and sewage disposal are studied in the Notes. Profes- 
sor Marston. 

Course XXII. — Hydraulic Engineering. — Three recitations 
per week throughout the second term, Senior Year, on the prin- 
ciples and methods involved in the design, construction and 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 177 

maintenance of water works systems. Text-book, Turneaure and 
Russell's "Water Supply Engineering." Professor Marston. 

Course XXI 1 1.— Masonry Structures.— Four recitations per 
week throughout the first term, Senior Year. Text-book, Baker's 
"Masonry Structures." The work consists in the study of prin- 
ciples involved in the design and construction of foundations, and 
in the design, construction and maintenance of all classes of 
masonry structures. Professor Marston. 

Course XXIV. — Practical Astronomy. — Four recitations and 
three hours field work per week for the last ten weeks of the first 
term, Junior Year. Required, Mathematics VII and IX. The 
work covers the ordinary methods of determining latitude, long- 
itude, and time, with their applications to Geodetic Surveying. 
Text-book, Hayford's "Geodetic Astronomy." Professor Wilson. 

Course XXV. — Thesis. — Credit equivalent to one recitation 
per week throughout the first term, Senior Year, is given for the 
' thesis work required during that term. See Course XXVI. 
Professor Marston. 

Course XXVI. — Thesis. — Credit equivalent to three recita- 
tions per week throughout the second term, Senior Year, is given 
for the thesis work required that term. The credits for thesis, 
Courses XXV and XXVI, require at least three hours per week 
thesis work throughout the first term, Senior Year, and nine 
hours per week throughout the second term, Senior Year. Stu- 
dents are required to put in as much additional time as may be 
i necessary to thoroughly work up the subject chosen, and to 
prepare a well-digested and complete write-up of the results. 
Most students devote much extra time to the work. The subject 
chosen must be one requiring original work. It may be the study 
and design of some engineering project (including the surveys), 
the investigation of some engineering question, or an experi- 
mental investigation. Professor Marston. 

U Course XXVII. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given 
equivalent to one recitation per week, first term, Junior Year. 
See Course XXX. Professor Marston. 

Course XXVIII. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given 
equivalent to one recitation per week, second term, Junior Year. 
See Course XXX. Professor Marston. 

Course XXIX. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given 
equivalent to one recitation per week, first term, Senior Year. 
See Course XXX. Professor Marston. 



178 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XXX. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given equiv- 
alent to one recitation per week, second term, Senior Year. 

The Civil Engineering Seminar, Courses XXVII to XXX, in- 
clusive, meets once each week, while College is in session, and 
has for its members the Professors and the Instructors in Civil 
Engineering, and all students in the Junior and Senior classes in 
the course in Civil Engineering. At each meeting five students 
give "journal reviews" of the most timely articles and topics 
found in the current numbers of the technical journals, a large 
number of which are regularly taken by the College Library. 
Another student then reads a paper on some engineering subject. 
Both the journal review and the paper are discussed by the other 
members of the Seminar. The subjects for the papers follow a 
regular, connected program, arranged in advance for each term. 
Professor Marston. 

Course XXXI. — Summer Surveying. — Fifteen entire days' 
work in the field in the summer vacation following the Freshman 
year. See Course XXXIII. Professor Marston, Professor Ash- 
baugh and Mr. Stewart. 

Course XXXII. — Summer Surveying. — Fifteen entire days' 
work in the field in the summer vacation following the Sopho- 
more year. See Course XXXIII. Professor Marston, Professor 
Ashbaugh and Mr. Stewart. 

Course XXXIII. — Summer Surveying. — Fifteen entire days' 
work in the field in the summer vacation following the Junior 
year. 

In the work of Courses XXXI to XXXIII, inclusive, the 
Professors of Civil Engineering and the students in the Course 
in Civil Engineering go into camp for fifteen days each summer 
vacation, beginning the Saturday before Commencement, and 
conduct an organized topographical survey of some region in the 
state. Each year's work continues that of the preceding year, 
until a large area is mapped. At present a strip about three 
miles wide, half on each side of the Des Moines river, south of 
Boone, is being mapped. Lower classmen will serve in subordin- 
ate positions. Upper classmen will have responsible charge of 
parties, and will do the triangulating and final mapping. All 
camp equipage, including tents and cooking utensils, will be 
furnished by the College. Students must pay their own traveling 
and living expenses. A corps of student officers has direct charge 
of the work, part of these officers being elected by the students 
and part appointed by the Department. It is one of the greatest 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



179 



honors in the course in Civil Engineering to be chosen on this 
corps of officers. The list of student officers for the summer 
camp of 1902 was as follows: 

Chief Engineer — C. H. Streeter. 
Assistant Chief Engineer — C. C. Morris. 
Computer— T. W. Dodd. 
Chief Draughtsman — E. H. Bruntlett. 
Junior Commissary — F. McClure. 
Sophomore Commissary — J. Q. Wickham. 
Freshman Commissary — C. W. Nash. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History 4 
French, 3, or 
German, 3 
Elocution, 2 
Drawing, 2 
♦Field Work, 2 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, XV.) 

(Languages, X.) 

(Languages XII.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 

(Civil Engineering, II.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5 

Plane Geometry, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 

History 2 

French, 3, or 

German, 3 

Drawing 2 

♦Field Work, 2 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, XVI.) 

(Languages, XII.) 

(Languages, XIII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

(Civil Engineering, III.) 



*The field work in the Academic year is optional but all students are urged 
to take it with a view to preparing to secure remunerative engineering work 
during the summer vacations. 



180 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Algebra, 5 

♦French, 5 or 

*German, 5 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

History, Formative Periods, 1 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 

Lettering, 1 

**Field Work, 2 

Military Drill, 2 

**Shop Work, 2 

Library Work, 4 hours 



(Mathematics, IV.) 

Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(English, III.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

(Civil Engineering, I.) 

(Civil Engineering, II.) 

(Military, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Library, I.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Solid Geometry and Plane Trignometry 

*French, 5 or 

*German, 5 

Composition, 1 

History, The American Nation, 1 

Descriptive Geometry, 5 

Drawing, 2 

**Field Work, 2 

Military Drill, 2 

**Shop Work, 2 

***Summer Surveying, 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Languages, VIII.) 

(English, IV.) 

(History, XVIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, V.) 

(Civil Engineering, III.) 

(Military, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXXI.) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Analytical Geometry, 5 
Physics, 5 
Surveying, 4 
Chemistry, 5 



(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Physics, III.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Chemistry, III.) 



*Beginning in September, 1904, the French or German in the Freshman yeai 
will be second year work. 

**Students who have completed Field Work can elect Shop Work. 

***A11 students in Civil Engineering go into camp fifteen days each summer 
vacation and conduct an organized topographical survey. 

Students entering the Freshman year in September, 1903, with credits for 
first year French or German will be required to take second year work in the 
same languages. 

Students entering the Freshman year, September, 1903, without previous 
work in French or German will be required to take first year work only. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



181 



Drawing, 1 
Composition, 1 
Military Drill, 2 



Calculus, 5 
Physics, 5 
Surveying, 4 
Chemistry, 5 
Drawing, 1 
Composition, 1 
Military Drill, 



(Civil En 



a ineering, VI.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND TERM. 



♦Summer Surveying, 2 1-2 weeks 



(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Physics, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, IX.) 

(Chemistry, VI.) 

(Civil Engineering, VII.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Military, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXI.) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

Spherical Trigonometry, 2 (Mathematics, XII.) 

Analytical Mechanics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

Electric Railways and Power Transmission 

(Electrical Engineering, XXXI.) 
(Civil Engineering, XXIV.) 



Practical Astronomy, 3 
Railway Engineering, 5 
Physical Laboratory, 2 
Seminar, 1 

♦♦♦History, XlXth Century, 2 
♦♦Debating, 1 



(Civil Engineering, X.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXVII.) 

(History, VII.) 

(English, VII.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 
Materials of Construction, 3 
Railway Engineering, 5 
Political Economy, 5 
Structural Designing, 2 
Engineering Laboratory, 2 
Seminar, 1 



(Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

(Civil Engineering, XI.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Civil Engineering, XVII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XIV.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXVII.) 



♦All students in Civil Engineering go into camp fifteen days each summer 
vacation and conduct a topographical survey. 

♦♦Elective, subject to approval of Professor of Civil Engineering. 

♦♦♦Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to approval of 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 



182 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

**Debating, 1 (English, VIII.) 

***History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VIII.) 

♦Summer Surveying, 21-2 weeks, (Civil Engineering, XXXIII.) 
In place of the two and a half weeks' summer surveying for 
any year there may be substituted not less than four weeks' 
actual engineering work done for some competent engineer, a 
reputable firm, or department engaged in engineering work. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

FIBST TERM. 

Framed Structures, 5 (Civil Engineering, XVII.) 

Hydraulics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 
Masonry Structures and Foundations, 4 (Civil Engineering XXII.) 

Stereotomy, 2 (Civil Engineering, XX.) 

Sanitary Engineering, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXI.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 (Civil Engineering, XV.) 

***History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VII.) 

Thesis, 1 (Civil Engineering, XXV.) 

Seminar, 1 (Civil Engineering, XXIX.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Framed Structures, 6 (Civil Engineering, XIX.) 

Geology, 4 (Geology, III.) 

Roads and Pavements, 2 (Civil Engineering, XII.) 

Hydraulic Engineering, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXII.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 (Civil Engineering, XVI.) 

***History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VII.) 

Thesis, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXVI.) 

Seminar, 1 (Civil Engineering, XXX.) 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, PROFESSOR. 
B. S. LANPHEAR, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 
G. N. MERENESS, ASSISTANT. 

This department aims to meet the needs of young men who 
have in mind the practice of electrical engineering in any of its 
various applications in the business world. 

It has been outlined with a view to securing for the student 
a thorough drill in those sciences, the principles of which underlie 

*A11 students in Civil Engineering go into camp fifteen days each summer 
vacation and conduct an organized topographical survey. SSK- *t) ' 

**Elective, subject to approval of Professor of Civil Engineering. 

***Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to approval of 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 183 

all electrical engineering practice, to secure for him a training 
in the application of scientific principles to the solution of prac- 
tical problems in engineering and to familiarize him with such 
methods of the laboratory and testing room as are available for 
practical and commercial determinations. 

The sciences of Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, are 
emphasized, as it is believed they are of first importance in such 
a course. The attention of the student is directed to the value 
of these subjects and he is urged to give them his most careful 
consideration. 

In recognition of the fact that a knowledge of Mechanical 
Engineering is essential to many electrical engineering operations 
a large part of the student's time is devoted to a training in this 
direction. The mechanical engineering work required of students 
in this course, includes mechanical drawing, shop-work, kinemat- 
ics, machine design, analytical mechanics, hydraulics, materials 
of construction, engineering laboratory and the study of the steam 
engine. 

Mechanical Drawing is taken up in the first term of the 
Freshman year and extends through the Sophomore year. 

Shop-Work extends to the end of the Junior year and includes 
work in the carpenter shop, in the forge shop and foundry and in 
the machine shop. 

In the course in Engineering Laboratory the work consists in 
the tests of strength of materials, viscosity of oils, efficiency of 
belt transmission, measurement of power, etc. 

The study of the steam engine is made as practical as possible 
by the taking and studying of indicator cards, the setting of 
valves, the measurement of clearance, etc. 

These several topics are fully discussed elsewhere under the 
head of Mechanical Engineering. 

Physics is the basis of the study of electricity and magnet- 
ism, the phenomena of which underlie electrical engineering 
theory and design, and is manifestly of sufficient importance to 
demand considerable time and attention in the training of the 
electrical engineer. In addition to the work in physics prescribed 
for all engineering students, the electrical engineering student 
spends six to twelve hours per week in the Junior and Senior 
years in the physical laboratory and class-room. 

Specialization begins in the Junior year with the advanced 
course in Electricity and Magnetism. 



184 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Laboratory work begins in tbe first term of the Junior year 
with a two hour (i. e. two afternoons per week) course in general 
physics. Laboratory work in electricity and magnetism, includ- 
ing work in the dynamo room and testing laboratory extends 
throughout the last two years of the course. 

The first work in the physical laboratory embodies the accur- 
ate measurements of length, mass and time, the adjustment and 
use of physical instruments and the determinations of physical 
constants. In the laboratory course in electricity and magnetism 
the student makes a study of primary and secondary batteries and 
the electrical instruments of the laboratory, the determination of 
the constants of measuring instruments and the methods of 
measuring the several electrical quantities. 

The laboratory work in Light and Sound consists largely in 
photometric measurements of various forms of commercial lamps. 

In the laboratory work of the Senior year the more practical 
applications of the principles of electro-magnetism are studied, 
together with the principles of the magnetic circuit, of current 
flow, etc. 

The topics of electric wiring, power transmission, electro- 
chemistry, telegraphy, telephony and electric signalling receive 
special attention in the latter part of the course. The laboratory 
work in these various topics is made to conform to the text book 
and lecture work. 

The study of alternating currents and alternating current 
machinery is taken up in the Senior year. In the class room work 
much stress is placed upon the theory of alternating currents and 
in the laboratory the student is afforded opportunity to study and 
familiarize himself with the phenomena peculiar to such currents. 

The department possesses seventeen experimental dynamos, 
including two arc machines, one 250 light Diamond Alternator 
and one 10 light Pony alternator, one 25-horse-power M. P. Ahlms- 
Edwards, direct-current motor; also one 45 K. W. Edison gener- 
ator, and other series and shunt wound continuous-current 
machines. There are also transformers of various types and a 
secondary battery of fifty cells. 

In addition to this equipment the student has access, for 
experimental and test purposes, to the electric machinery of the 
College power house and lighting plant. Among other machines 
in this plant are two 15 K. W. Edison dynamos; one 30 K. W. 
Edison dynamo; one 15 K. W. 500 volt generator; one four-pole 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 185 

K. W. compound-wound generator; one 15 K. W. alternator; 
one 30 K. W. alternator, and one 60 K. W. alternator. There is 
also a series of motors for driving the machinery of the Mechan- 
ical Engineering Department which range in size from five to 
twelve horse-power, which are available for test purposes. 

An extended system of wiring connects all rooms of the 
department with the switchboards of the dynamo laboratory and 
the apparatus room. At these switchboards are the terminals 
of a line connecting with a 110 volt, 45 K. W., direct-current 
machine, which is available as a current source during the 
day. During the evening hours there are available 110 volt 
direct or alternating current circuits. 

The courses offered by the Department of Electrical Engi- 
neering are outlined specifically below. The course numbers 
are those given in the discussion of courses offered by the De- 
partment of Physics. 

Course III. — Mechanics and heat, first term. 

Course IV. — Light and Sound, Electricity and Megnetism, 
second term. Two lectures and three recitations per week. 
Mathematics IV, V and VI required. Course III is a prerequisite 
of Course IV. 

In this course stress is placed upon the fundamental prin- 
ciples of the subject and a very thorough study is made of vec- 
tor quantities and their graphical treatment in problem work. 

The various subjects are discussed from a mathematical 
standpoint, and the student is urged to familiarize himself with 
the theoretical side of the work, as it is believed such a foun- 
dation is very helpful, if not absolutely essential to the work 
which follows. Text-book, Hastings and Beach, "General Phy- 
sics." Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle, and Mr. Wenner. 

Course VI. — Electricity and Magnetism. — Three hours per 
week, first term. Physics III and IV and Mathematics IX re- 
quired. 

Lectures, recitations and problem work. A course in the 
elementary theory of electricity and magnetism. Discussion of 
the principles of electro-magnetism. Discussion of the prin- 
ciples of electro-magnetic action and their application in various 
forms of measuring instruments and the development of labor- 
atory methods of measuring the several electrical quantities. 

Text-book, Nichols and Franklin's "Elements of Physics," 
Vol. II. Professor Lanphear. 



18G IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Couese X. — Dynamo Electric Machinery. — Lectures and reci 
tations, four hours per week, second term. Physics VI is a pre 
requisite of this course. 

General theory of the direct-current dynamo, the establish 
ment of the electro-motive forces by induction, the magnetic cir 
cuit, armature winding, etc. A study of "characteristic curves' 
and the adaptation of the different types of direct-current ma 
chinery to various commercial purposes is included. 

As a text and reference book S. P. Thompson's "Dynamo Elec 
trie Machinery" is used. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XI. — Alternating Currents. — Lectures and recitations 
four hours per week, first term. Physics X required. 

Discussion of the theory of alternating currents, study o 
the circuit containing self-induction and capacity, methods o 
measuring currents, electro-motive force and power in alternal 
ing current circuits. 

Text-book, Jackson's "Alternating Currents and Alternatin. 
Current Machinery." Professor Spinney. 

Couese XII. — Applied Electricity. — Lectures and Problems 
four hours per week, second term. Physics XI required. 

Continuation of Course XI. Study of alternating current mi 
chinery — dynamos, transformers, etc., including a discussion c 
the synchronous motor, the induction motor, the rotary tran! 
former and polyphase current machinery. 

Discussion of high-potential transmission lines and electr 
cal machinery adapted to transmission purposes. 

Text-books and references, Jackson's "Alternating Current 
and Alternating Current Machinery," Franklin and Williamson 
"Alternating Currents," Thompson's "Polyphase Electric Cu 
rents," Bedell and Crehore's "Alternate Currents," etc. Profe 
sor Spinney. 

Couese XIII. — Telephony. — Lectures and recitations, or 
hour per week, second term. A general study of the principk 
of telephony, the telephone, telephone lines, cables and cob 
mercial apparatus. Open to Seniors in Electrical Engineering i 
an elective. Professor Lanphear. 

Coueses XIV and XIV. — General Physical Laboratory. — Tv 
afternoons and one afternoon respectively per week, first ten 
Measurements of length, mass and time, determination of phys 
cal constants, use of the barometer, thermometry, calorimetr 
etc. Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle, and Mr. Wenner. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 187 

Couese XV. — Physical Laboratory], Elementary Electrical 
Measurements. — One afternoon per week, second term, or 

Couese XVI. — Two afternoons per week, first term, or 

Couese XVII. — Two afternoons per week, second term. The 
measurement of the electro-motive force and internal resistance 
of primary and secondary batteries, the use of Wheatstone's 
bridge, measurement of current, determination of galvanometer 
constants, high resistance measurements, insulation tests, etc. 
Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle, and Mr. Wenner. 

Couese XVIII. — Physical Laboratory, Electrical Testing. — 
Two afternoons per week, first term, or 

Couese XIX. — Two afternoons per week, second term. Cali- 
bration of instruments, absolute measurements, etc. Professor 
Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Couese XX. — Physical Laboratory, Dynamo, Motor and Com- 
mercial Plant Testing. — Three afternoons per week, first term. 

The efficiencies of dynamos and motors, experimental de- 
termination of characteristic curves, magnetic leakage, etc. Criti- 
cal study of commercial plants, determination of efficiencies, etc. 
Professor Lanphear and Mr. Mereness. 

Couese XXI. — Physical Laboratory. — Study of alternating 
currents. Two afternoons per week, second term, Senior year. 

Measurements of alternating current circuits, experimental 
ietermination of mutual and self-inductances, capacities, etc. 

The study of alternating current dynamos and motors and 
commercial transformers is included. Professor Spinney and 
Mr. Mereness. 

Couese XXII. — Electric Circuits. — Two lectures per week, 
first term. Physics VI required. 

Determination of size of leads, allowable cross-section of 
conductors from the standpoint of economy, taking into consid- 
eration current prices of copper, etc., the rates of interest and 
the cost of electrical energy. Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXIII. — Electric Designing. — The designs of bat- 
teries, commercial ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, etc. One 
afternoon per week, second term, Junior year. 

Couese XXIV. — Electric Designing. — Two afternoons per 
week. First term, Senior Year. The design of dynamos, motors, 
transformers, etc. Professor Lanphear. 



188 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XXV. — Electrical Designing. — Three afternoons per 
week. Second term, Senior year. Continuation of Course XXIV. 
Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXVI. — Thesis begun, and 

Course XXVII. — Thesis finished. Total equivalent of four 
hours per week of one term. 

Each student in the course of Electrical Engineering is re- 
quired to prepare a thesis in the Senior year representing, in 
the work done upon it, the equivalent of at least four hours 
per week of one term. 

This thesis may be of the nature of the design and con- 
struction of some electrical machine or measuring instrument, 
the efficiency test and critical study of some dynamo-electro 
machine or power plant, or of electrical research work of special 
direction. 

Course XXIX. — Electrical Seminar. — One hour per week, 
first term, and 

Course XXX. — Electrical Seminar. — One hour per week, sec- 
ond term. A continuation of Course XXIX. Professor Spinney. 

This course consists of the preparation, presentation and 
discussion of papers upon special assigned topics in electrical 
engineering. 

It is required that the papers presented shall be carefully 
written out and submitted for critical reading to the Professor 
in charge. 

Journal reading is made part of this course. 

Course XXXI. — Electric Railways and Power Transmission. 
— An elementary study of the application of the principles of 
electro-magnetism to the transmission and distribution of power 
for industrial purposes, including power plants, transmission 
lines and electric motors. 

Lectures, recitations and problem work, three hours per 
week, first term. Physics III, IV, and Mathematics IX required. 
Professor Lanphear. 

Course XXXII. — Electrical Machinery. — A discussion of the 
construction and operation of electrical machinery and its ap- 
plication to electric lighting and power distribution. 

Two hours per week, second term. Professor Lanphear. 









DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



189 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, 4 
French, 3 or 
German, 3 
Elocution, 2 
Drawing, 2 



Algebra, 5 

Plane Geometry, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 

History, 2 

French, 3 or 

German, 3 

Drawing, 2 



(Mathematics, Ij 

(English, I.) 

(History, XV.) 

. (Languages, X.) 

(Lauguages, XII.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, XVI.) 

(Languages, XI.) 

(Languages, XVI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 

Advanced Algebra, 5 
♦French, 5, or 
♦German, 5 
Advanced Rhetoric, 5 
History, Formative Periods, 1 
Shop-Work, 2 
Mechanical Drawing, 2 
Military Drill, 2 
Library Work, 4 hours 



(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(English, III.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

(Military, I.) 
(Library, I.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5 
*French, 5, or 
*German, 5 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Languages, VIII.) 



♦Beginning September, 1904, Freshman French or German will be second 
year work. Students entering the Freshman year, September, 1903, with 
edits in French or German, will be required to take second year work in the 
same language. Students entering the Freshman year, September, 1903, with- 
out previous work in French or German will be required to take first year 
work only. 



190 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Composition, 1 (English, IV.) 

History, The American Nation, 1 (History, XVIII.) 

Descriptive Geometry, 5 (Civil Engineering, IV.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX or XXXII.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, II.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, VIII.) 

Physics, 5 (Physics, III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, III.) 
Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX, XXXI or XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

Composition, 1 (English, V.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, III.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Calculus, 5 (Mathematics, IX.) 

Physics, 5 (Physics, IV.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, VI.) 
Shop- Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX, XXXI, or XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

Composition, 1 (English, VI.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, IV.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Differential Equations, 3 (Mathematics, X.) 

Analytical Mechanics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

Electricity and Magnetism, 3 (Physics, VI.) 

Political Economy, 5 (Economic Science, I.) 

Physical Laboratory, 2 (Physics, XIV.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1. (Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 
Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

♦Debating, 1 (English, VII.) 

**History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Analytical Mechanics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, II.) 

Dynamo-Electric Machinery, 4 (Physics, X.) 



♦Elective, subject to the approval of the Professor of Electrical Engineering 
♦♦Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to the approva 
of Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



191 



Steam Engine, 3 

Material of Construction, 3 

Electrical Design, 1 

Physical Laboratory, 2 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 

Shop-Work, 2 

♦Debating, 1 

♦♦History, XlXth Century, 2 



(Mechanical Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XXIII.) 

(Physics, XVII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXIV.) 

(English, VIII.) 
(History, VIII.) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Alternating Currents, 4 
Hydraulics, 4 
Steam Engine Design, 3 
Physical Laboratory, 3 
Electrical Design, 2 
Electric Circuits, 2 
♦♦History, XlXth Century, 2 
Seminar, 1 
Thesis, 1 



(Physics, XL) 

(Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, VII.) 

(Physics, XX.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XXIV.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XXII.) 

(History, VII.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XXVI.) 



SECOiND TERM. 



Constructing Engineering, 3 
Physical Laboratory, 2 
Electric Design, 3 
Applied Electricity, 4 
♦Telephony, 1 

♦♦History, XlXth Century, 2 
Seminar, 1 
Thesis, 3 



(Mechanical Engineering, IX.) 

(Physics, XXI.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XXV.) 

(Physics, XII.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XIII.) 

(History, VIII.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XXX.) 

(Electrical Engineering, XXVII.) 



DEPARTMENT OF MINING ENGINEERING. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, PROFESSOR. 
LEWIS E. YOUNG, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. I. A. WILLIAMS, INSTRUCTOR. 

The courses in Mining Engineering are planned to give the 
student a ready familiarity with the branches which form the 
ground work of the science of Mining and Metallurgy. The de- 
partment of Mining Engineering aims to give him such a thor- 

♦Elective. 

♦♦Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year subject to the approval 
of Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



192 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ough training in the fundamentals as will enable him after 
graduation to acquire in a comparatively short time the prac- 
tical experience absolutely necessary before he is fitted to assume 
positions of great responsibility in the mining industries. The 
Department offers two courses: a four years; and a two years. 
The first is intended for those students who desire a "thorough 
course in Theoretical and Practical Mining," and underlying 
sciences, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Min- 
ing Engineering. The requirements for admission are the same 
as those for admission to other Engineering courses. Stu- 
dents who pursue this course to completion are expected to be 
able to undertake the "full management of mining in its va- 
rious branches," at least as practiced in Iowa and to become fa- 
miliar with the principles involved and the methods employed 
in good mining engineering practice in general. 

The latter course is designed for young men who have had 
some practical experience in mines, and wish to study mine 
surveying, drafting, the problems of ventilation, drainage, haul- 
age, mine operating, etc., and also to learn something of the 
sciences which bear upon their work but have neither the time 
nor the preparation for a full College course. Elementary mathe- 
matics, drawing and shop-work receive considerable attention 
during the first year, while the professional studies are reserved 
for the second year. Candidates who are twenty-one years of 
age or over are admitted without examination. All others must 
give evidence of a thorough grounding in the common branches. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The Department of Mining Engineering occupies six rooms 
on the third floor and one on the first floor of Engineering Hall 
and shares in common with the other Engineering departments 
the blue print, photographic, Engineering Museum and Assembly 
rooms. Of the rooms used exclusively by the Department of 
Mining Engineering, one is used for laboratory purposes only, two 
for laboratory and lecture purposes, one as a museum, and three 
afford space for supplies, instruments, books, and filing cases, 
in addition to their use for office purposes. 

Lecture Room and Laboratory in Mining Engineering. — This 
room is provided with seventy-five opera chairs with folding arm 
rests, a wall table cabinet occupying all of the outside wall space 
and so arranged as to provide excellent working space in front of 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 193 

the windows while the space between the windows is utilized for 
the filing of study material. Above the wall table, lockers with 
glass doors are provided, in which students may keep books and 
small pieces of apparatus free from dust. The windows are all 
provided with opaque shades and the room with a permanent 
lantern screen. The balance of the interior wall space is oc- 
cupied by slate blackboards. A large cabinet lecture table com- 
pletes the equipment of the room. 

Seminar Room. — The seminar room is used for both lab- 
oratory and lecture purposes as in the case of the preceding, in 
addition to serving as a conference room and headquarters for 
the Junior and Senior students in Mining Engineering. It is 
equipped with two long tables standing at right angles to and 
directly connected with a large cabinet lecture table, the whole 
forming a continuous table in the form of a U. The room has a 
seating capacity of thirty-six and is supplied with movable re- 
volving chairs, and slate blackboards on the interior walls. In 
addition the room contains a twenty-two tray filing case for 
large drawings, plats and maps, and a supply case. 

Metallurgical Laboratory. — The laboratory for Metallurgy 
and Ceramics is located on the ground floor and is fitted with 
soapstone topped cabinet wall tables occupying all the outside 
walls and a large fume chamber, supply and display cases. It 
is supplied with water, gas, compressed air, exhaust and elec- 
trical connections. It already contains a Hoskin's No. 4 muffle 
furnace and a Bosworth assay furnace with the usual acces- 
sories for doing metallurgical and ceramic work. 

The Museum. — The museum for Geology and Mining Engi- 
neering is fitted with eight museum cases with sloping glass 
tops and cabinet bases. The bases supply room for one hundred 
and ninety-two trays in which the working collections and dupli- 
cate material in Geology and Mineralogy are filed. One large cen- 
tral case containing the larger casts of the "Ward Series," a 
series of cases, showcase tops and cabinet bases, occupy the 
space between the windows, and permanent cases occupy all of the 
partition wall space. 

The offices supply room for apparatus, supplies, books, and 
filing cases. 

The Department is supplied with a Sullivan core drill with a 
complete set of tools and accessories for carrying on actual field 

operations; a "Queen" Light Mountain mining transit; a "Ber- 

13 



194 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ger." No. 4 Mining transit with interchangeable side and top 
telescope; a Brunton transit; a sensitive six-dial anemometer 
reading to ten millions of feet and adapted for the measurement 
of currents of air through mines and tunnels — an instrument ab- 
solutely necessary in order to deal intelligently with the prob- 
lems of mine ventilation; a miner's level with rods and sight- 
ing poles; a set of miner's tools; a barometer, clinometer, a se- 
ries of miner's lamps and various instruments used in ascer- 
taining distances. 

The laboratory in Metallurgy and Ceramics, aside from the 
list of utensils to be found in any well equipped laboratory for 
a branch of chemical work, is supplied with the following special 
pieces of apparatus: Weatherhead mortar and porcelain mortars 
for pulverizing; a set of brass brickette molds; chemical bal- 
ance; torsion balance; one Hoskin's No. 4 muffle furnace; one 
Bosworth assay furnace; Le Chatelier thermo-electric pyrometer; 
and a Seger volumeter. 

The proximity of Ames to the Iowa coal fields affords easy 
access to the coal mines of Boone and Polk counties. The great 
centers of the clay industries, Des Moines, Boone, and Fort 
Dodge are equally accessible, while the quarries of Marshall 
county are scarcely more than an hour's ride from the College. 
These and numerous allied industries are, after all, the most 
important ana indispensable laboratories for the practical mining 
engineer. The Department undertakes to present the accepted 
theories concerning mineral aggregation, origin and occurrence 
but these theories can be put to the test only by an intelligent 
use of the drill, the level and the plane table. The accredited 
methods of winning the ores and minerals receive full discussion 
in the class-room, but only render obvious the necessity of 
becoming familiar with the practical workings of the sluice box, 
the tipple and the stamp mill. The chemical and physical prop- 
erties of a clay may be ascertained in the laboratory, but a com- 
plete knowledge of its properties and its mode of treatment can 
be gained only by following it from the pit to the street. In 
short, the Department aims to give as complete an exposition of 
the theories and laws which underlie the Science of Mining as 
the time will permit, but the verification and application of these 
theories and laws must be made, in large measure, in the field 
and in the industries. 



DIVISION Or ENGINEERING 195 

COURSES IN MINING. 

The work of the first two years in the four years' course in 
Mining Engineering is exactly the same as that required in the 
course in Mechanical Engineering, with the exception that Sur- 
veying takes the place of Mechanical Drawing, and the addition 
of Principles of Mining in the second term, Freshman. The pro- 
fessional studies are given due prominence during the last 
two years of the course and the student is required to take 
continuous work in mining, chemistry and metallurgy and geol- 
ogy, through the last three terms. He is expected to make one of 
these branches the subject of special investigation and to embody 
the results of such investigation in a thesis, which is required 
of every student who is a candidate for graduation. 

It is generally recognized that there is of necessity a con- 
siderable gap between the work included in the College curricu- 
lum and that of the professional engineer; and that the stu- 
dent in Engineering must gain the larger part of his professional 
training outside of college walls. The courses in summer field 
work are offered in the hope that his apprenticeship may be 
reduced to a minimum, and are required of all students in the 
four years' course in Mining Engineering. 

Course I. — Principles of Mining. — Two hours per week, sec- 
ond term, Freshman year. The student receives instruction in the 
general and elementaray principles of mining in order that he 
may appreciate something of what he sees and hears before he 
makes a detailed study of Prospecting, Exploitation, Mining 
Methods and the various subjects included in Courses II, III and 
IV. Special attention is given to mining terms and local mining 
methods. 

Course II. — The Principles of Mining. — Second term. Junior 
year, and counts three hours per week. The first ten weeks of 
the term are devoted to a consideration of the methods em- 
ployed in excavating, boring and shaft-sinking, and in mining 
and the support of mine excavations, while the remainder of the 
term is given up to a critical study of methods employed in ex- 
ploration, development and mine working in general. 

Course III. — Continuation of Course II. — Three hours per 
week and runs through the first term, Senior year. The work em- 
braces a thorough discussion of the principles involved in coal 
mining in general and is followed by a careful consideration of 
those principles which are applicable to the Iowa coal fields in 



196 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

particular. Mine ventilation, drainage and lighting receive due 
attention. 

Course IV. — Mining Engineering. — Second term, Senior year, 
and counts four hours per week. Mine plant, administration and 
mine accounts receive especial attention. The term's work in- 
volves a critical study of mining machinery, with especial refer- 
ence to the types best adapted to meet the requirements of the 
various conditions in actual practice. Also mine buildings and 
the general equipment and administration of a mine plant are 
considered. At the beginning of the term's work, a short pe- 
riod is given to a theoretical consideration of ore-dressing. 

Course V. — Milling Law. — One hour per week, second term of 
Senior year. An outline of the most important laws affecting 
the mineral industry is presented to the men as they are com- 
pleting their work in the department. While the laws on the 
statute books at the present time are for the greater part local 
and while a study of them in the time available is out of the 
question, the necessity of some knowledge of the law is im- 
pressed upon the student and he is shown where he can obtain in- 
formation on the simpler questions. 

Course VI. — Seminar. — Required of the students in Mining 
Engineering, first term, Junior year, and counts one hour. 

Course VII. — Seminar. — Continues the work of Course VI. 
Counts one hour second term, Junior year. 

Course VIII. — Seminar. — A continuation of Course VII and 
counts one hour, first term, Senior year. 

Course IX. — Seminar. — Continues the work of the three 
terms preceding and counts one hour, second term, Senior year. 
Courses VI to XIX, inclusive, are for the purpose of bringing 
together the students of the Junior and Senior years and mem- 
bers of the instructing corps for weekly conferences. Such con- 
ferences afford occasion for the discussion of timely topics in 
which the student members take part freely. 

Course X. — Mine Surveying. — Two hours per week first term, 
Junior. During the Sophomore year the mining student takes 
the regular course in surveying offered by the department of 
Civil Engineering. Mine Surveying supplements the work of the 
Sophomore year and presents various methods of surveying 
specially adapted to mines and tunnels. Part of the time is given 
to practical work with top and side telescope and the various cal- 
culations which its use requires. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 197 

Course XL — Thesis. — Required of all candidates for gradua- 
tion in the course of Mining Engineering and counts one hour 
during the first term, Senior year, and three hours during the 
second term. 

Course XII. — Summer Field Work in Mine Surveying. — The 
work is carried on in one of the coal mining districts of the 
state and comprises the complete survey of a mine and a thor- 
ough examination of the equipment and mode of operation of 
a typical mine for the district, and leads in the first place to a 
mine map, and in the second to a careful report on a mine prop- 
erty, accompanied by the necessary illustrations. The time re- 
quired is two full weeks. Open to students who have completed 
the Freshman or Sophomore years. 

Course XIII. — Summer Field Work in the Study of Mine 
Operation and Equipment, and of Concentrating Plants. — This 
course necessitates a visit to one of the great metal producing cen- 
ters outside of the state. A careful study of mine properties is 
made, and a detailed report, properly illustrated by sketches and 
drawings, is required. A portion of the time is devoted to a 
study of ore dressing and concentrating plants. The time re- 
quired is four weeks, and the course is open to students who 
have completed the Junior or Senior years. 

Course XIV. — Metallurgy. — Three hours per week, second 
term, Junior year. The term's work comprises a study of refrac- 
tory materials, fluxes, fuels and furnaces. Especial attention is giv- 
en to pyrometry, calorimetry, fire clays and coke. The various 
metallurgical furnaces are studied from working drawings. 

Course XV. — Metallurgy Continued. — Five hours per week 
first term, Senior year. Instruction in this course is confined to 
the processes relating to iron and steel, copper, lead, silver, gold 
and zinc. In the time allotted to the work, a study of the mat- 
allurgy of all the metals could not be made satisfactorily, and 
it is deemed best to confine the work to the most important metals 
and the most important processes. The principles of ore dressing 
and preparation for metallurgical treatment is given in the second 
term, Senior year, in Course IV. 

Course XVI. — Ceramics. — The work of the term is devoted 
to a consideration of the origin, composition, properties and dis- 
tribution of the crude materials used in the clay and cement 
industries. The physical properties of clays are studied and 



198 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

mechanical analyses are made in the laboratory, paralleling the 
class-room work. 

Course XVII. — Ceramics. — The course includes a discussion 
of the principles involved in the manufacture of clay goods. 
Methods of selecting and winning the raw materials, their 
preparation, standard processes of manufacture, burning and 
clay testing are treated as fully as the time will permit. 

Course XVIII. — Ventilation and Haulage. — Five hours per 
week, first term of the two years' course in Mining. The work of 
the term is devoted to a careful consideration of the problems 
effecting the distribution of air in mines and mine drainage. 
Some attention is given to the discussion of standard methods of 
hoisting and haulage in mines. 

Course XIX. — Mine Exploration and Operation. — Five hours 
per week during the last term in the two years' course in Mining. 
Exploration, shafting, timbering, and methods of mine oper- 
tion, especially as adapted to the Iowa coal fields are the prin- 
cipal topics treated. Mine accounts and administration receive 
such attention as their importance and the time will permit. 

Course XX. — Mining Arithmetic. — Five hours per week first 
term of first year in the two years' course in Mining. The funda- 
mental operations in arithmetic are reviewed rapidly during the 
first half of the term, while measurements, square and cube root 
and practical problems relating to mining are made duly promi- 
nent during the last half of the term. 

Course XXI. — Field Work in Mine Surveying. — First term, 
first year in the two years' course in Mining Engineering. The 
first year men serve as apprentices in the work of mine sur- 
veying, acting in the capacity of rod-men and chainmen to the 
parties conducted by higher classmen. 

Course XXII. — A Continuation of Course XXI. — During the 
first half of the term on account of the usual inclemency of the 
weather, one half day per week is devoted to a study of mine 
plats and maps. 

Course XXIII. — Field Work in Mining. — First term, second 
year, and required of students in the two years' course in Mining. 

Coubse XXIV. — Continues the Work of Course XXIII. — Spe- 
cial attention is directed to mine operation and equipment. 

Courses in Geology required of students in Four Year Course 
in Mining Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



199 



Course II. — General Geology. — Five hours per week first half 
of Junior Year. This course embraces a discussion of the prin- 
ciples which form the groundwork of the science. The first ten 
weeks are devoted to dynamic and structural geology and the last 
six weeks to stratigraphic and historical geology. The student 
is required to make several excursions to points of geological in- 
terest to verify the more salient facts discussed in the class-room. 
Prerequisites: Physics III and IV and Chemistry III and IV. 

Course IV. — Geology, Advanced. — Five hours per week second 
term of Senior year. The nature, mode of occurrence and origin 
of the minerals and rocks which constitute the earth's crust, are 
considered in some detail in the first half of the term, while 
rock alteration as involved in metamorphism and weathering 
receives special attention during the second half. Excursions are 
continued as in Course II, and students are encouraged to famil- 
iarize themselves with the methods employed in doing research 
work and to make independent observations. Prerequisite: 
Geology II. 

Course VI. — Mineralogy. — Two hours class-room and one 
hour laboratory per week, second half of Junior year. This 
course is intended to give the student a clear idea of the mor- 
phological and physical properties of crystalline substances. Pre- 
requisites: Physics III and IV, Chemistry III and IV and Math- 
ematics VI. 

Course VII. — Mineralogy, Descriptive and Determinative. — 
Three hours class-room work and one hour laboratory per week, 
first term of Senior year. This work is devoted to the study of 
the more important mineral species, their properties, uses, dis- 
tribution and methods of determination. 

MINING ENGINEERING. 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FTRST TERM. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, 4 
French, 3 or 
German, 3 
Drawing, 2 

Algebra, 5 

Plane Geometry, 5 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, XV.) 

(Languages, X.) 

(Languages, XV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 

SECOND TERM. 

(Mathematics, II or III.) 
(Mathematics, V.) 



200 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 (English, II.) 

French, 3, or (Languages, XI.) 

German, 3 . (Languages, XIII.) 

History, 2 (History, XVI.) 

Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Advanced Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, IV.) 

*French, 5, or (Languages, III.) 

*German, 5 (Languages, VII.) 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 (English, III.) 

History, Formative Periods, 1 (History, XVII.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIj 

Lettering, 1 (Civil Engineering, I.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, I.) 

SECOND TEEM. 

Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5 (Mathematics, VI.) 
*French, 5 or (Languages, IV.) 

*German, 5 (Languages, VIII.) 

Composition, 1 (English, IV.) 

Descriptive Geometry, 5 (Civil Engineering, IV.) 

History, The American Nation, 1 (History, XVIII.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX.) 

Military Drill, 2 - (Military, II.) 

Principles of Mining, 2 (Mining Engineering, I.) 

**Summer Field Work, Two W T eeks. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Analytical Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, VIII.) 

Surveying, 4 (Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

Physics, 5 (Physics, III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, III.) 



♦Beginning with September, 1904, the French or German in the Freshman 
year will be second year work. 

Students entering the Freshman year, September, 1903, with credits for 
first year French or German will be required to take second year work in the 
same language. Students entering the Freshman year, September, 1903, with- 
out previous work in French or German will be required to take first year 
work only. 

**Students who secure instructive employment during their summer vaca- 
tions between Freshman-Sophomore and Sophomore-Junior years will be ex- 
cused from summer field work providing they are so employed for at least one 
month subject to the approval of the head of the department. 






DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



201 



Drawing, 2 
Composition, 1 
Military Drill, 2 

Calculus, 5 
Surveying, 4 
Physics, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Composition, 1 
Drawing, 2 
Military Drill, 2 
♦Summer Field Work, 



(Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

(English, V.) 
(Military, III.) 

SECOND TERM. 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Civil Engineering, IX.) 

(Physics, IV.) 

(Chemistry, VI.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIII.) 

(Military, IV.) 
Two Weeks. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

Electric Railways and Power Transmission, 3 

(Electrical Engineering, XXXI.) 



Geology, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Mine Surveying, 2 
♦♦♦♦History, XIX Century, 2 
Seminar, 1 
♦♦Debating, 1 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 

Steam Engine, 3 

Mineralogy, 3 

Mining, 3 

Chemistry, 3 

Metallurgy, 3 

♦♦♦♦History, XIX Century, 2 

Seminar, 1 

♦♦Debating, 1 



(Geology, II.) 

(Ckemistry, VII and VIII.) 

(Mining Engineering, X.) 

(History, VII.) 

(Mining Engineering, VI.) 

(English, VII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

(Mechanical Engineering, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, IV.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Mining Engineering, II.) 

(Chemistry, XII.) 

(Mining Engineering, XIV.) 

(History, VIII.) 

(Mining Engineering, VII.) 

(English, VIII.) 



*** 



Summer Field Work, Four Weeks. 



♦Students who secure instructive employment during their summer vaca- 
tions between the Freshman-Sophomore years and the Sophomore-Junior 
years will be excused from summer field work, providing they are so employed 
for at least one month subject to the approval of the head of the department. 

♦Elective, subject to the approval of the Professor of Mining Engineering. 

♦♦Junior students in Mining Engineering who secure instructive employ- 
ment in one of the great metal mining districts of the country will be excused 
from the Junior summer field work providing they are so employed for at 
least six weeks, subject to the approval of the head of the department. 

♦♦♦♦Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to the approval 
of the head of the Mining Engineering Department. 



202 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST 

Railway Engineering, 5 
Mineralogy, 3 
Metallurgy, 5 
Mining, 3 
Chemistry, 2 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 
Specifications and Contracts, 1 
*History, XIX Century, 2 
Seminar, 1 



TEEM. 

(Civil Engineering, X.) 

(Geology, VII.) 

(Mining Engineering, XV.) 

(Mining Engineering, III.) 

(Chemistry, XXX.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, VIII.) 

(History, VII.) 

(Mining Engineering, VIII.) 



SECOND TEEM. 



Materials of Construction, 3, or 
Political Economy, 3, or 
Constructive Engineering, 3 
Geology, 5 
Mining, 4 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 
Mining Law, 1 » 

*History, XIX Century, 2 
Seminar, 1 
Thesis, 3 



(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

(Economic Science.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, IX.) 

(Geology, IV.) 

(Mining Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mining Engineering, V.) 

(History, VIII.) 

(Mining Engineering, IX.) 

(Mining Engineering, XL) 



TWO YEARS COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

FIRST YEAR. 



Mining Arithmetic, 5 
Elementary Algebra, 5 
Elementary Physics, 5 
Drawing, 2 
Shop-Work, 2 



FIRST TERM. 

(Mining Engineering, VIII.) 

(Mathematics, I.) 

(Physics, V.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 



Field Work in Mine Surveying, One-Half Day per Week 

(Mining Engineering, 



XXI.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Geometry, 5 
Advanced Algebra, 5 
Plane Trigonometry, 5 
Physical Geography, 3 



(Mathematics, V.) 

(Mathematics, II.) 

(Mathematics, VIB.) 

(Geology, I.) 



♦Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to the approval o 
the Professor of Mining Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 203 

Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX.) 

Field Work in Mine Surveying, One-Half Day per Week 

(Mining Engineering, XXII.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Mining, 5 (Mining Engineering, V.) 

Mine Surveying, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXXIV.) 

Engineering Geology, 4 (Geology, III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, III.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

Field Work in Mining Engineering, 1 

(Mining Engineering, XXIII.) 
Engineering Laboratory, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Mining, 5 (Mining Engineering, VII.) 

Steam Engineering, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVIII.) 

Economic Geology, 5 (Geology, IV.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, VI.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 

Field Work in Mining Engineering, 1 

(Mining Engineering, XIV.) 

COURSE IN CLAY-WORKING AND CERAMICS. 

The short course in Clay-Working is designed to assist young 
men to a knowledge of the fundamental principles which under- 
lie the science of Ceramics. The course is offered with a view of 
extending tne same sort of service to the Ceramic industries 
as the course in Agriculture renders to the Agricultural indus- 
tries, or the course in Mechanical Engineering renders to the 
Mechanical industries. 

TWO YEARS COURSE IN CERAMICS. 
FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Elementary Mineral Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XIII.) 
Elementary Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, I.) 

Elementary Physics, 3 (Physics, V.) 

Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 



204 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

SECOND TEEM. 

Mineral and Geological Chemistry, 5 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XIV.) 
Plane and Solid Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, V.) 

Physical Geography, 3 (Geology, 1.1 

Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Chemistry of Clays, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XV.) 

Ceramics, 5 (Mining Engineering, XVI.) 

Engineering Geology, 4 (Geology, III.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Chemistry of Clays and Glazes, 5 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XVI.) 
Ceramics, 5 (Mining Engineering, XVII.) 

Steam Engineering, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XVIII.) 

Economic Geology, 5 (Geology, IV.) 

Testing Clay Products, 3 (Civil Engineering.) 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE AS RELATED TO INDUSTRIES 



MATHEMATICS. 

PHYSICS. 

CHEMISTRY. 

BOTANY. 

ZOOLOGY. 

GEOLOGY. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

LITERATURE AND RHETORIC. 

ELOCUTION. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

HISTORY. 

MILITARY SCIENCE. 

LIBRARY. 

MUSIC. 



206 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc, 

Acting President and Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 

Lecturer in Veterinary Science. 

GEN. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Military Science. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

LOUIS H. PAMMEL, B. Ac, M. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, B. A., M. A., 

Professor of French and German. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc, 

Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. Sc, 

Professor of Zoology. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. 0., 

Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History and Philosophy. 

JOHN H. McNEALL, V. M. D„ 

Dean of Veterinary Science. 

MISS MARY A. SABIN, B. A., 

Professor of Domestic Economy. 
HOMER C. PRICE, M. S. A., 

Professor of Horticulture. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE £07 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 

FRANK J. RESLER, B. Ph., 

Director of Music, Vocalist. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 

Assistant Professor in Mathematics. 

MISS ELMINA T. WILSON, C. E., 

Assistant Professor in Civil Engineering. 

MRS. ELIZABETH RESLER, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Instrumental Music. 

MRS. MARIAN H. KILBOURNE, B. L., 

Dean of Women. 

MISS LOLA A. PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ORA F. EDGETT, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Free-Hand Drawing. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Di., 

Instructor in English. 

IRA A. WILLIAMS, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Geology. 

E. B. TUTTLE, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Physics. 

ARTHUR T. ERWIN, M. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS GRACE I. NORTON, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

MISS ADA J. MILLER, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 



208 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. Sc, 

Instructor in Zoology. 

MISS SADIE HOOK, B. L., 

Instructor in Elocution and Physical Culture for Women. 

CHESTER M. PERRIN, B. Sc., 

Instructor in History. 

BENJAMIN H. HIBBARD, B. Ag., Ph. D., 
Instructor in Economic Science. 

F. WENNER, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS BERYL A. HOYT, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ANNIE W. FLEMING, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS FLORENCE BARBER, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Domestic Science. 

MISS MAE MILLER, B. Sc, 

Instructor in History. 

WARD JONES, B. C. E., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

R. C. McKINNEY, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry, 

MISS ALICE MERRITT, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Domestic Science. 

MISS FRANCES M. WILLIAMS, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Domestic Arts. 

MISS HELEN G. REED, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

E. E. LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

MISS ESTELLA D. FOGEL, B. A.. 

Assistant in Botany. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 

Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE E. STEVENS, B. L., 

Assistant Librarian. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 209 

DIVISION OF SCIENCE AS RELATED TO THE INDUSTRIES. 

The courses of study in the Division of Science lead to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Many of the courses of study taught in this Division form a 
very essential part of those belonging to the other Divisions, so 
that the wort?; required for the various degrees conferred by the 
College authorities is very thoroughly interwoven. 

The object of the work in this Division is very comprehen- 
sively expressed in the act of Congress establishing this and 
similar colleges. The founding of these colleges on a basis of 
scientific learning has proved to be the beginning of an important 
epoch in educational history. The courses of study in this 
Division are less technical than are many of those of the other 
Divisions. The real advances in modern civilization have been 
along the lines of science study and investigations. It is the 
intent therefore to lay a broad foundation in scientific facts and 
principles in order to fit the graduate to fill his place in the affairs 
of the world. .There can be no better preparation for the duties 
of life and for citizenship than the knowledge and mental train- 
ing given by a genuine study of the sciences. 

During the first two years the lines of study are well marked 
out and but little choice of subjects is given. The required 
mathematics end with the Freshman year. The subject may be 
pursued, however, during the remainder of the course, provided 
the student desires and is qualified to do so. 

The various branches of the study of the English language 
extending throughout the Freshman and Sophomore years are 
sufficient in scope and purpose to give the needed training in the 
use of English. The modern languages, namely, French and 
German, are great store-houses of the sciences, and consequently 
courses of study in these languages are offered to the student in 
the earlier years of his work to enable him to use these languages 
in the last two years of his study. 

Students in this course are required to select at the begin- 
ning of the Junior Year a particular science which shall consti- 
tute a line of work during the last two years of the course. They 
must devote at least three hours per week to this science each 
term and not less than thirty-two hours of scientific work must 
be taken in the two years. The other studies may be taken from 
the electives offered. The study of the sciences is strongly sup- 
ported by work in literary, historical and psychological lines. 



210 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



The course of study for young women leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science permits a more extended study of the 
languages, and especially of French and German. A characteris- 
tic feature of the work for young women is the study of Domestic 
Economy. This subject is studied throughout the four years. 
The equipment and character of the work done in this direction 
are carefully described under the topic, "Department of Domestic 
Economy." These courses of study in Domestic Economy are 
open also to young women who may be candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science. 

More detailed statements of the purpose and character of the 
courses of study pursued for the two degrees belonging to this 
Division are given under the statements for each department. 

SCIENCE. 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5, or 
*German, 5 
^Elocution, 2 
Drawing, 2 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5 

Plane Geometry, 5 

Elementary Botany, 2 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 or 

German, 5 

History, 4 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(Botany, I.) 

(English, II.) 

(Languages VI.) 

(History IIA.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Algebra, 5 
Botany, Ecology, 2 
**German, 5, or 
French, 5 



(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Botany, II.) 

(Languages, V or VII.) 

(Languages, I.) 



*Beginning German may be taken only by those students who can show 
satisfactory evidence of proficiency in the English of the Academic year. 
**Beginning German according to the preparation of the student. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



211 



Physiography, 3 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

Domestic Art, 2 (for women) 

Military Drill, 2 (for men) 

Library Work, 4 hours 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women). 

SECOND TERM. 



(Geology, I.) 

(English, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, I.) 

(Military, I.) 

(Library, I.) 



6olid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5 (Mathematics, VI.) 
or (Languages, VI or VIII.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Botany, III.) 

2 (Zoology, I.) 

(Elocution, II.) 
1 (English, IV.) 

(Domestic Economy, II.) 
(Military, II.) 



♦♦German 5, 

French, 5 

Histology, 4 

Entomology, 2 

Elocution, 1 

Composition, 1 

Domestic Science, 2 (for women) 

Military Drill, 2 (for men) 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women). 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



♦Analytical Geometry, 5 

♦Cryptogamic Botany, 5 

♦Vertebrate Zoology, 5 

German, 4, or 

French, 4 

Physics, 5 

Composition, 1 

Domestic Science, 2 (for women) 

Military Science, 2 (for men) 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women). 



(Mathematics, VIII.) 

Botany, IV:) 

(Zoology, II.) 

(Languages, IX.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Physics, I.) 

(English, V.) 

(Domestic Economy, III.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND TERM. 



* ># Calculus, 5, or 
♦♦♦Invertebrate Zoology, 5 
Chemistry, 5 



(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Zoology, III.) 

(Chemistry, II.) 



♦♦Beginning German according to the preparation of the student. 

♦The student shall elect two of these studies. The study omitted may be 
elected in the Junior or Senior year and counted in those years. 

♦♦♦Choice between Calculus and Invertebrate Zoology. The study omitted 
may be taken in the Junior or Senior year and counted in those years. 



212 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Physics, 5 

Composition, 1 

Domestic Art, 2 (for women) 

Miltary Drill, 2 (for men) 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women). 



(Physics, IV.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Domestic Economy, IV.) 

(Military, IV.) 



* JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TEEM 

Differential Equations, 3 

Advanced Crypotogamic Botany, 3 

Economic Botany, 2 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 

Chemistry, 5, or 

Political Economy, 5 

Elocution, 2 

Debating, 1 

Histology, 2 

English Literature, 3 

Domestic Science, 2 

Entomology, 5 

***Photography, 2 

.Embryology, 3 to 5 

Surveying, 4 

Physiology, 1 

-History, Mediaeval Institutions, 3 

History, The French Revolution, Etc., 2 

Geology, 5 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Military Science, 1 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women). Required 



(Mathematics, X.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Chemistry, V.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Elocution, III.) 

(English, VII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXX.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Domestic Economy, V.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Physics, IX.) 

(Zoology, V.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XVII.) 

(History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Military, V.) 



SECOND TERM. 

Advanced Differential Equations, 3 



(Mathematics, XI.) 



*At the beginning of the Junior year students in this course must select a 
particular science — Botany, Zoology, Physics, Economic Science, Chemistry' 
Geology or Mathematics — which shall constitute a line of work during the 
Junior and Senior years. The hours of study given to the science chosen shall 
not be less than three per week in each term; and not less than thirty-two hours 
of scientific work shall be taken during the two years. The scientific work 
outside of the particular line shall be selected by the student after consultation 
with the president and the head of the department in which the line of study 
is chosen. The other studies taken shall be selected by the student after con- 
sultation with the president and the heads of the departments having charge 
of such studies. The studies for each term shall not be less than sixteen nor 
more than twenty hours per week. 

***This subject may be taken only on the recommendation of the Professor 
under whom the student takes the major portion of his work. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 213 

Animal Parasites, 2 (Zoology, VIII.) 

Bacteriology, 2 (Botany, VII.) 

Systematic Botany, 3 (Botany, XV.) 

Organic Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, IX) 

Money and Banking, 2 (Economic Science, IV.) 

Finance, 3 (Economic Science, V.) 

Elocution, 2 (Elocution IV.) 

Comparative Anatomy, 5 (Zoology, VII.) 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, IX.) 

Debating, 1 (English, VIII.) 

English Literature, 5 (Literature, II.) 

Domestic Art, 2 (Domestic Economy, VI.) 

Mineralogy, 4 (Geology, VI.) 

Physical Labratory, 1 or 2 (Physics, XV.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VI.) 

Public Speaking, 1, required. (Elocution, VIII.) 

History, The 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries, 3 (History, VI.) 

History, Europe since 1850, 2 (History, XI.) 
Physical Culture, 1 (for women). Required. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Spherical Trigonometry and Advanced Geometry, 5 (Math., XV.) 
Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 3 (Veterinary Science, I.) 

Political Economy, 3 (Economic Science, III) 

History of Political Economy, 2 (Economic Science, II.) 

Mineralogy, 4 (Geology, VI.) 

History, Development of the United States, 3 (History, III.) 

History, the Reconstruction Period, 2 (History XII.) 

History of Art, 2 (Domestic Economy, XI.) 

Fiction, 3 (Literature, III.) 

Domestic Art, 2 (Domestic Economy, VII.) 

Organic Chemistry, 5 or (Chemistry, XIV.) 

Blow-Pipe Analysis and Assaying, 5 (Chemistry VII and VIII.) 
Chemistry of the Household, 2 (Chemistry, XVI and XVIA.) 

Psychology, 5 (Philosophy, I.) 

Agrostology, 2 (Botany, XIII.) 

Vegetable Pathology, 3 or 5 (Botany, V.) 

Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 3 (Botany, VI.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, XI.) 

Elocution, 2 (Elocution, V.) 



214 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 (Physics, XIV.) 

Morphology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, X.) 

Neurology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, XL) 

Evolution of Plants, 1 (Botany, XIX.) 

Advanced Entomolgy, 3 to 5 (Zoology, IX.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VII.) 

One oration, required (Elocution, IX.) 

Botanical Seminar, 1 (Botany, XVIII.) 

SECOND TERM. 

Advanced Calculus (Mathematics, XVI.) 

Evolution of Animals, 1 (Zoology, VI.) 

Astronomy, 5 (Physics, VII.) 

Geology, 5 (Geology, IV.) 

History of Civilization, 3 (History, IV.) 

History, The Far Eastern Question, 2 (History, IX.) 
History of Art, 2 (Domestic Economy, XII.) 
Domestic Science, 2 (Domestic Economy, VIII.) 

American Literature, 3 (Literature, I.) 

Vegetable Physiology, 2 or 5 (Botany, XI.) 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 (Botany, VIII.) 

Ethics, 3 (Philosophy, II.) 

Elocution, 2 (Elocution, VI.) 

Chemistry, 3 or (Chemistry, XIII.) 

Chemistry, 4 or (Chemistry, XXXI.) 

Chemistry, 4 (Chemistry, XXXII.) 

Evolution of Plants, 1 (Botany, XIX.) 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 ( (Zoology, IX.) 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 (Physics, XV.) 

Evolution of Cultivated Plants, 1 (Horticulture, VI.) 

Morphology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, X.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VIII.) 

Botanical Seminar (Botany, XVIII.) 
Thesis, required, 1 

GENERAL AND DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

(For Women Only.) 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, I.) 

English, 5 or (English, I.) 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



215 



♦German, 5 
History, 5 
Elocution, 2 
Drawing. 2 



(Languages, V.) 

(History, I.) 

(Elocution, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, 5 

Plane Geometry, 5 

Elementary Botany, 2 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 or 

♦German, 5 

History, 4 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(Mathematics, V.) 

(Botany, I.) 

(English, II.) 

(Languages. VI.) 

(History, IIA.) 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Advanced Algebra, 2 
German, 5, or 
French, 5 
Domestic Art, 2 



Chemistry, 5 
Advanced Rhetoric, 5 
Physical Culture, 1 



(Mathematics, XIV.) 

(Languages, V or VII.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Domestic Economy, I.) 

(Chemistry, XXII.) 
(English, III.) 



SECOND TERM. 

Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, 5 

German, 5 or 

French, 5 

Domestic Science, 2 

Chemistry, 5 

Elocution, 1 

Composition, 1 

Physical Culture, 1 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, VI or VIII.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Domestic Economy, II.) 

(Chemistry, XXIV.) 

(Elocution, II.) 

(English, IV.) 



♦German may be taken only by those students who can show to the Pro- 
fessor of Rhetoric satisfactory evidence of proficiency in the English of the 
Academic year. 

♦♦Beginning with advanced German according to the preparation of the 
student. 

Students wishing to elect Advanced Chemistry or Advanced Mathematics 
may do so, leaving Physics and Botany as required studies in the Junior year. 



216 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



German, 4 or 
French, 4 

Domestic Science, 2 
Physics, 3 or 4 
Human Physiology, 3 
Ecology, 2 
Elocution, 2 
Composition, 1 
Physical Culture, 1 



(Languages, VII or IX.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, III.) 

(Physics, I.) 

(Zoology, XII.) 

(Botany, II.) 

(Elocution, VII.) 

(English, V.) 



SECOND TERM. 



German, 4 or 
French, 4 
Domestic Art, 2 
Physics, 3 or 4 
Human Physiology, 3 
Histology, 4 
Compostion, 1 
Physical Culture, 1 

Students wishing to elect Advanced Chemistry or Advanced Mathematics 
in the Sophomore year, may do so, leaving Physics and Botany as required 
studies in the Junior year. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



(Languages, VIII.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Domestic Economy, IV). 

(Physics, II.) 

(Zoology, XIII.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(English, VI.) 



FIRST TERM. 



(Required.) 



♦History, Mediaeval Institutions, 3 
History, The French Revolution, 2 
English Literature, 3 
Domestic Science, 2 
Physical Culture, 1 

(Electives.) 

Physiography, 3 
Vertebrate Zoology, 5 
Floriculture, 2 



(History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Domestic Economy, V.) 



(Geology, I.) 

(Zoology, II.) 

(Horticulture, XI.) 



*Literature and History are reqired for one year, and may be taken in 
either Junior or Senior year. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



217 



Cryptogamic Botany, 4 
Economic Botany, 2 
Chemistry, 5 

Advanced Physiology, 3 to 5 
Analytical Geometry, 5 
Differential Equations, 3 
Political Economy, 5 
Elocution, 2 
French, 5 
German, 5 



(Botany, IV.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Chemistry, XL) 

(Zoology, XIV.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Mathematics, X.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Elocution, III.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 



SECOND TERM. 



(Required.) 



♦History, The 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries, 3 
English Literature, 5 



Bacteriology, 2 
Public Speaking, 1 
Domestic Art, 2 
Physical Culture, 1 

(Electives.) 

Invertebrate Zoology, 4 

Entomology, 2 

Plant Propagation and Small Fruits, 3 

Market and Home Gardening, 2 

Ferns, 3 

Organic Chemistry, 5 

Advanced Physiology, 3 to 5 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Advanced Mathematics, 3 

Calculus, 5 

Finance, 3 

Money and Banking, 2 

History, Europe Since 1850, 2 

Debating, 1 

Elocution, 2 

French, 5 

German, 5 

Wood Carving, 1 



(History, VI.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Elocution, VIII.) 

(Domestic Economy, VI.) 



(Zoology, III.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Horticulture, I.) 

(Horticulture, V.) 

(Botany, XVII.) 

(Chemistry IX.) 

(Zoology, XV.) 

(Physics XIV.) 

(Mathematics, XI.) 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Economic Science, IV.) 

(History, XL) 

(English, VIII.) 

(Elocution, IV.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XLII.) 



♦Literature and History are required for one year, and may be taken in 
either Junior or Senior yeaa. 



218 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



(Required.) 



*History, Mediaeval Institutions, 3 
English Literature, 3 
History of Art, 2 w 

Oration, 1 
Domestic Art, 2 

(Electives.) 



(History, V.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Domestic Economy, XI.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Domestic Economy, VII.) 



Geology, 5 

Entomology, 5 

Embryolgy, 3 to 5 

Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 3 

History, The French Revolution, Etc., 2 

Agrostology, 2 

Vegetable Pathology, 2 or 5 

Botanical Seminar, 1 

Chemistry of the Household, 2 

Dairying, 3 

Psychology, 5 

Educational Psychology, 3 

Political Economy, 3 

History of Political Economy, 2 

History, Development of the United States, 3 

History, The Reconstruction Period, 2 

Fiction, 3 

Domestic Economy, 2 

Elocution, 2 

French, 4 or 

German, 4 

Landscape Gardening, 

(Required.) 



(Geology, II.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Zoology, V.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(History, X.) 

(Botany, XII I.) 

(Botany, V.J 

(Botany, XVIII.) 

(Chemistry XVI and XVIA.) 

(Dairying, XII.) 

(Philosophy, I.) 

(Philosophy, III.) 

(Economic Science, III.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(History, III.) 

(History, XII.) 

(Literature, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, IX.) 

(Elocution, V., 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(Horticulture, VIII.) 



SECOND TERM. 



*History, The 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries, 3 (History, VI.) 
English Literature, 5 (Literature, II.) 

Home Decoration, 2 (Domestic Economy, XII.) 

Thesis, 1. 
Domestic Science, 2 (Domestic Economy, VIII.) 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



219 



(Electives.) 
Geology, 5 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 
Evolution of Animals, 1 
Evolution of Plants, 1 
Vegetable Physiology, 2 
Advanced Bacteriology, 3 
Botanical Seminar, 1 
History, Europe since 1850, 2 
Ethics, 3 

Educational Psychology, 3 
History of Civilization, 3 
History, The Far Eastern Question, 2 
American Literature, 3 
Domestic Economy, 2 
Elocution, 2 
French, 4, or 
German, 4 



(Geology, IV.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Zoology, VI.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(Botany, XI.) 

(Botany, VIII.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(History, XI.) 

(Philosophy, II.) 

(Philosophy, III.) 

(History, IV.) 

(History, IX.) 

(Literature, IV.) 

(Domestic Economy, X.) 

(Elocution,VI.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Languages, VIII.) 



Wood Carving, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XLII.) 

In the Junior and Senior years a student is permitted to take 
each term not less than 16 nor more than 20 hours per week. 



^Literature and History are required for one year, and may be takeu in 
either Junior or Senior year. 

TWO YEARS COURSE IN DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Chemistry, 5 
Physics, 3 
Ecology, 2 
English, 5 
Domestic Science, 2 
Domestic Art, 2 

Chemistry, 5 
Physics, 3 
Histology, 4. 
Zymotechnic, 1 
Composition, 1. 
Domestic Science, 2. 
Domestic Art,2. 



SECOND TERM. 



(Chemistry, XXII.) 

(Physics, II.) 

(Botany, II.) 

(English, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, II.) 

(Domestic Economy, I.) 

(Chemistry, XXIV.) 

(Physics, I.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Botany, XXVII.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Domestic Economy, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, IV.) 



220 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Organic Chemistry, 3. 
Human Physiology, 3 
Educational Psychology, 
History of Art, 2 
Domestic Science,2 
Domestic Art, 2 
Domestic Economy, 2 



(Chemistry, IX.) 

(Zoology, XII.) 

(Philosophy, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, XI.) 

(Domestic Economy, V.) 

(Domestic Economy, VI.) 

(Domestic Economy, IX.) 



SECOND TERM. 



Chemistry, 1 or* 2 
Human Physiology, 3. 
Bacteriology, 2 
House Decoration, 2 
Educational Psychology, 3. 
Domestic Science, 2. 
Domestic Art, 2 
Domestic Economy, 2 



(Chemistry, XVI and XVIA.) 

(Zoology, XIII.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XII.) 

(Philosophy, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, VIII.) 

(Domestic Economy, VII.) 

(Domestic Economy, X.) 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, PROFESSOR. 

MISS ROBERTS, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

MR. PATTENGILL, MISS COLPITTS, MISS FLEMING, MR. JONES 

AND MISS MILLER, ASSISTANTS. 



The work of the Department of Mathematics is directed to 
;the following ends: 

(1) The Development of Intellectual Strength. — Such a de- 
gree of thoroughness is required as awakens interest and stimu- 
lates to earnest effort. The work is so arranged as to compel the 
student to abandon the mere mechanical methods of reaching re- 
sults. He can make little or no progress except through the mas- 
tery of principles and methods; and in their application there is 
demanded of him a high degree of ingenuity, care and courage. 
He is subjected to the continuous discipline of holding details in 
mind, comparing facts, drawing conclusions and advancing to the 
discovery of new truth. He learns to think, judge, originate, and 
through his mathematical training gains mental strength. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 221 

^2) Accuracy in Presentation of Mathematical Truths. — The 
student is required not only to think clearly, but to put his 
thought into concise and precise English. In the explanation 
of examples he is asked to bring out and emphasize the principles 
involved, dealing in detail with such equations only as are nec- 
essary to this purpose. In the solution of problems an analysis 
of statement and equation must be given, definitions and theorems 
must be stated clearly and accurately and in the demonstration of 
propositions the use of correct language is considered as second- 
ary only to the employment of correct logic. 

(3) The acquirement of such Command of the Subject Mat- 
ter of Mathematics as will make it a Valuable Instrument iri 
Higher Scientific and Technical Study. — To this end an effort is 
made to eradicate from the student's mind the idea entertained 
by many, that mathematical truths are learned simply to be for- 
gotten, and to awaken in its place an eanest desire to obtain a 
comprehensive and abiding knowledge of the essential facts of 
the science. Thoroughness in daily recitation is demanded, fre- 
quent reviews are given and final credits are made to depend 
largely upon the student's grasp of principles and the readiness 
and the accuracy with which he performs the simple and the com- 
plex operations involved in their application. Each branch as 
it is taken up is so presented as to require the constant employ- 
ment of the principles and facts of the preceding mathemat- 
ical studies. The Department aims in this way to give the stu- 
dent such a degree of mathematical maturity and self-reliant 
mastery as will enable him to use his mathematical knowledge 
with profit either in advanced collegiate work or as an instructor 
in our high schools and academies. 

In the Engineering Courses, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonom- 
etry, Analytical Geometry and Calculus are required studies. 
Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry are required in all the four 
year courses except the course in Veterinary Science, while the 
advanced mathematical work is either optional or elective. 

The following are the several courses in Mathematics: 

Course I. — Algebra to Involution. — It is expected that stu- 
dents entering this course will have such a knowledge of ele- 
mentary algebra to simple equations as may be obtained by thor- 
ough work in the high school. If the student's preparation is 
in excess of this requirement it will be greatly to his advantage. 

The subjects included in the review and advance work of this 



222 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

course are those which generally precede involution in any stan- 
dard text. They are treated, however, in an exhaustive manner 
and the examples and problems given are more difficult than those 
found in the ordinary text-book. Special stress is laid upon the 
statement of definitions and the demonstration of principles. 

Course II. — From Involution to Ratio and Proportion. 
— This course is open to those who have completed Course I. The 
following subjects are studied: Involution of Monomials and 
Polynomials; Evolution, including the consideration of the higher 
roots of polynomials, and rules for determining the roots of num- 
bers based upon the algebraic method of extracting roots; Rad- 
icals, including the fundamental operations, involution, evolution, 
rationalization, imaginary quantities, extracting the square root 
of binomial surds and the solution of equations involving radi- 
cals; Pure and Affected Quadratics; Equations solved like quad- 
ratics; and Simultaneous Quadratic Equations. Frequent written 
reviews are given covering work in this Course and Course I. 

At the completion of this course students are expected to have 
such grasp of algebra through quadratics as will enable them to 
handle its principles up to this point without error and perform 
the operations required, with rapidity and accuracy. 

Course III. — Algebra to Ratio and Proportion. — This Course 
covers practically the same subjects as those enumerated in 
Courses I and II. Much of the work, however, is taken in rapid 
review, only one term being devoted to the combined courses. 
The object aimed at is not elementary instruction in the science, 
but a wider grasp of principles and familiarity with their applica- 
tion in more difficult fields. Many of the examples assigned are 
such as are met with in the higher mathematics. The student is 
thus introduced to a quality of work demanding a broad view of 
principles and methods and a marked degree of skill in algebraic 
manipulation. 

The course should be undertaken by those only who have al- 
ready had large experience in algebraic work and who have de- 
veloped considerable strength in this study. The minimum re- 
quirement for entrance is a thorough knowledge of algebra 
through simple equations. The Course is especially intended, 
however, for students who have completed algebra in the high 
•school and who need to give the work a thorough review before 
entering upon advanced work. Admission is secured by examina- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 223 

tion or upon the certificate of the proper officer of an accredited 
high school. 

Course IV. — Advanced Algebra Completed. — The subjects 
treated in this Course are ratio, proportion, variation, arithme- 
tical progression, geometrical progression, harmonical progression, 
the binomial theroem, convergency and divergency of series, 
theorem of undetermined coefficients including partial fractions 
and reversion of series, principles and use of logarithms, per- 
mutations and combinations, probability and the theory of equa- 
tions. 

The Course is open to students of the College who have taken 
Courses I and II or Course III; also to graduates of the fully 
accredited high schools who furnish the proper certificates. The 
first ten days of the time alloted to the course is devoted to a 
review of algebra up to and including quadratics. Students who 
fail to stand the test of this review will be assigned to such work 
as they are prepared to undertake. 

Graduates of accredited schools are earnestly urged to care- 
fully review their work in algebra before entering this course. 
The sample questions printed elsewhere in this catalogue give a 
good idea of the knowledge of the subject needed. The Depart- 
ment will gladly unite with the student and his school principal 
in arranging to test the thoroughness of his home review; such 
test can be given in connection with the work of the high school 
and, if satisfactory to the Department, will be accepted in lieu 
of the review test at the College. The student can then begin his 
advanced work without delay. Students designing to take the 
review here must be present promptly at the opening of the term. 
Correspondence regarding this whole matter is cordially invited. 

Students not graduates of the fully accredited schools will 
be admitted to this course upon passing a satisfactory examina- 
tion upon the work covered by Course III. As stated under "Re- 
quirements for Admission," arrangements can be made with the 
principals of high schools or county superintendents to conduct 
such examinations. The principal of any school desiring to test 
the ability of his students to enter upon the work of this course 
will be furnished, upon request, a list of examination questions. 
The Department will be pleased to mark the examination papers 
and enter upon its records as accredited students in the Mathe- 
matical Department the names of all students who show that they 
are prepared to take up the work with success. 






224 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Course V. — Plane Geometry. — The topics included in this 
course are those usually treated in a standard text. They include 
the fundamental definitions and axioms, theorems relating to rec- 
tilinear figures and the circle, measurement of angles; doctrine of 
limits; theory of proportion; similar polygons; comparison and 
measurement of the surfaces of rectilinear figures; measurement 
of the circle, and geometrical construction of plane figures. The 
text book used is Phillips and Fisher. The proofs outlined in 
the text must be fully amplified; definitions must be stated with 
precision; authority cited must be given in full and the logical 
steps in demonstration must be so arranged and presented as to 
constitute a complete and rigid proof. The student must under- 
stand each proposition and be able to state the demonstration 
in concise geometric language. Special emphasis will be laid 
upon the demonstration of original exercises. The course is open 
to those who furnish the head of the department with satisfactory 
evidence that they have a thorough knowledge of the subjects in 
Course I. 

Course VI. — (a) £ olid and Spherical Geometry. — This course 
is open to those who have met the requirements for admission to 
the mathematics of the second term of the Freshman year. A 
week is given at the beginning to a review of plane geometry, 
one day being devoted to each book. Students are required to 
write out or demonstrate orally such propostions as may be as- 
signed, using in preparation the text book studied in the prepar- 
atory school. Looking forward to this work the students immed- 
iately before leaving home should carefully go over the whole 
subject of plane geometry. Those who show in the week's review 
a satisfactory knowledge of definitions and ability to handle suc- 
cessfully advanced geometric work will be assigned to the classes 
In solid geometry. The subjects considered in the remainder of 
the course will be the properties of planes, of diedral and poly- 
edral angles, of prisms, of pyramids and other polyedrons, of cyl- 
inders, cones and spheres, of spherical triangles and spherical 
polygons. 

(b) Plane Trigonometry. — Courses III, IV, V, and Via are 
essential preliminary studies. The subjects investigated are de- 
finitions; positive and negative angles; circular measures of ang- 
les; operations upon angles; functions of angles, their relations 
and varying values; determination of values of the functions of 
particular angles; functions of different angles expressed in terms 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 22 



r. 



of those of a basal angle; derivation and reduction of trigonom- 
etric formulas; solution of right and oblique triangles. The 
'points most strongly emphasized are: Care in tracing the trig- 
onometric functions of varying angles in the different quadrants, 
'readiness and skill in the derivation and reduction of trigonom- 
etric formulas, and accuracy in the use of logarithmic tables. 

Course VII. — Spherical Trigonometry. — This work is requir- 
ed in the first term, Junior year, of the Civil Engineering course. 
It is elective to students in the science and ladies' course. Course 
VI and the studies necessarily preliminary thereto are required 
for entrance. The spherical right triangle is investigated; tri- 
angles of reference are formed and formulas deduced therefrom; 
Napier's rules are explained; the six different cases arising in the 
solution of right triangles are discussed and illustrated by numer- 
ous examples. Spherical triangles in general are considered; the 
formulas relating thereto are derived and applied to the sol- 
ution of examples; interesting problems connected with the cel- 
estial spheres are included in the course. 

Course VIII. — Plane Analytic Geometry. — This subject is 
taught largely from the standpoint of its value as a disciplinary 
study. Once the student is impressed with the spirit of its meth- 
od, the beauty of its logic and the excellent field for analytical 
reasoning it opens up, he will readily find his way to a mastery 
of the particular facts it reveals. The student is introduced to 
the subject through a review of the special algebraic, trignome- 
tric and geometric conceptions upon which it is based; these are 
applied to the analytic representation of points in a plane and 
the proposition established that all geometric lines and curves 
can be represented by equations and their properties and relations 
discovered by a study of these equations. The line, the circle 
and the conic sections are in this way most carefully investigated. 
Examples involving principles are solved and from a knowledge 
of particular the student is led to the demonstration of general 
theorems. The generalized truth is then employed in the develop- 
ment of other truth, and thus the student is given a most excellent 
drill in both inductive and deductive reasoning. At the same 
time his needs, as an engineering or scientific student, of a knowl- 
edge of the facts of analytic geometry, are fully met. The Analy- 
tic Geometry by Tanner and Allen of Cornell University is used 

as a text. 

15 



226 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course IX. — Differential and Integral Calculus. — All pre- 
ceeding mathematical work should be completed before this 
course is undertaken. Calculus bears to that work the double 
relation that, while it is based upon it and cannot be pursued 
successfully except as the work has been well mastered, it on the 
other hand furnishes a most excellent opportunity for a general 
review of the preceding mathematical studies and gives to all 
that has gone before a significance and value which it would oth- 
erwise lack. It is therefore a most important part of any extend- 
ed and thorough mathematical course. The abstruse principles 
of this higher method of mathematical investigation are explained 
upon the theory of limits. The theory of infinitessimals is also 
employed. Instruction is given by daily recitations with a re- 
view of the week's work each Friday. In differential calculus 
the rules of differentiation, expansion of functions, indeterminate 
forms, tangents, normals and asymptotes, direction of curvature, 
points of inflection, radius of curvature, order of contact, the 
osculating circle, singular points and maxima and minima of 
functions are studied. In integral calculus much time is spent 
in acquiring a usable knowledge of the forms of integration. 
Application of integration is then made to the determination of 
the lengths of plane curves, areas of plane surfaces and surfaces 
of revolution, volumes of solids of revolution and other solids. 

Course X. — Differential Equations. — This course is required 
of electrical engineers and is open to all students of the College 
who have completed Course IX. The work covered by it may be 
considered as supplementary to integral calculus. The course 
includes the formation of differential equations; solutions of 
equations of the first order with applications to geometry, me- 
chanics and physics. 

Course XI. — Differential Equations. — This course is open to 
those who have completed Course X. The subjects covered are 
the methods of handling linear equations with constant and 
variable coefficients; exact differential equations; integration 
in series; equations of the second order with geometrical, mechan- 
ical and physical applications; ordinary differential equations 
with more than two variables; partial differential equations of 
the different orders. 

Course XII. — Algebra through Quadratics. — Given first term, 
Academic year. This course, which is designed especially for 



L 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 227 

students in agriculture, covers the work in Course* III. To com- 
plete it successfully in the time allowed the student should have 
knowledge of at least the fundamental operations. It will be 
greatly to his advantage if he has taken the work as far as invo- 
lution. 

Course XIII. — Algebra; Permutations and Combinations, Bi- 
nomial Theorem and Logarithms. — Given second term, Academic 
year, agricultural courses. Four weeks are devoted to this algebra. 
The work includes permutations and combinations; the binomial 
and logarithms. 

Course XIV. — Algebra. — Given first term, Freshman year, 
General and Domestic Science Course, two recitations per week. 
The requirements for admission to this course are the same as for 
Course IV. Students from accredited schools will be given a 
short review through quadratics at the beginning of the term. 
Their permanent assignment will be determined by the character 
of their work in this review. Attention is called to the sample 
questions in algebra appearing in this catalogue, under the head 
of "Entrance requirements in mathematics;" students are also 
urged to read with care the remarks upon Course IV. 

The subjects treated in the course are ratio, proportion, vari- 
ation, arithmetical and geometrical progression, permutations 
and combinations, the binomial theorem, undetermined coeffi- 
cients, logarithms and the theory of equations. Students master- 
ing the work thus outlined will be able to take the advanced 
mathematics offered in the course in General and Domestic 
Science. 

Course XV. — Spherical Trigonometry and Advanced Analytic 
Geometry. — The first six weeks of this course includes the same 
work as is covered by Course VII. In the last ten weeks of the 
semester, advanced work in analytic geometry will be taken up. 
Some time will be devoted to the general equation of the second 
degree and to higher plane curves, after which the study of 
analytic geometry of three dimensions will be considered. First 
term, five hours. 

Course XVI. — Advanced Calculus. — This course deals with 
the application of differential calculus to the discussion of the 
properties of curves. It treats also of the analytical methods of 
representing a point in space, the relation of different points, 
transferring the reference from one set of axes to another, locus 
of equations of two and three variables, surfaces of revolution, 



228 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

planes, straight lines and quadratic surfaces. The principles in- 
volved are illustrated by numerous examples. 

Course XVII. — Solid Geometry and Trigonometry. — This 
course takes up the most essential principles of solid geometry 
and work in trigonometry practically the same as is given in 
Course VIb. It is given in the Agricultural Courses, Freshman 
year, second term, four hours per week. 

Special arrangement of Mathematical Work for Agricultural 
Courses. — Students who have had considerable experience in alge- 
bra and who enter the Agricultural Course in the spring can 
begin their mathematical studies at once and pursue them in 
regular order until they are completed, taking the work as fol- 
lows: 

Spring term: Course III. 

Fall term: A special class will be formed which will com- 
plete the work in algebra and take plane geometry. 

Second spring term: Course VI. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, PROFESSOR. 
MR. TUTTLE AND MR. WENNER, INSTRUCTORS. 

This department is located in Engineering Hall. It occupies 
sixteen commodious rooms, including six laboratories, two stand- 
ardizing and testing rooms, two research rooms, two apparatus 
rooms, three offices and a large lecture room. 

The lecture room is modern in its equipment, which includes 
a convenient system of darkening shutters for the windows and a 
large permanent lantern screen, to facilitate demonstration work. 
At the lecture room tables are electric, gas and water connections, 
placing at the disposal of the lecturer a water pressure of fifty 
pounds per square inch and electric currents from storage bat- 
teries, and direct or alternating current dynamos. 

The department has a good equipment in apparatus for dem- 
onstration purposes, which is stored in apparatus rooms adjoining 
the lecture room. 

The general laboratory rooms are large and well lighted and 
are equipped with heavy oak tables, slate-top piers and wall tables 
with heavy stone tops for the support of the laboratory apparatus. 
Convenient electric, gas and water connections are provided. A 
very serviceable equipment in the apparatus used in general 



J 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 229 

phsyical laboratory work is furnished. Among other apparatus 
may be mentioned a laboratory clock, with electric connections, a 
chronograph, a reversion pendulum, two torsion pendulums for 
the experimental determination of "moment of inertia" and the 
"coefficient of simple rigidity," a physical pendulum, apparatus 
for the determination of the "intensity of gravity" by observa- 
tions on a body rolling on an inclined plane, analytical balances, 
Jolly's balance, hydrostatic balance, apparatus for the determin- 
ation of "Young's Modulus" by stretching and by bending, appar- 
atus for the coefficient of linear expansion, a cathetometer, optical 
benches, telescopes and microscopes, spectroscopes, a sacchari- 
meter, hydrometers, thermometers, barometers, galvanometers, 
Wheatstone bridges, "testing apparatus," electro-calorimeters, sil- 
ver, copper and water voltameters, etc. 

The photometry rooms are equipped with several photometer 
benches and are furnished with gas and electric connections. The 
arrangement of apparatus is made with a view of facilitating the 
regulation tests of arc and incandescent lamps as well as those 
of other sources of illumination. 

The dynamo room is equipped with experimental dynamos, 
including arc machines and direct and alternating current ma- 
chinery of various types together with a convenient switch-board 
and extended system of electric connections. An equipment in 
ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, transformers, dynamometers, 
etc., is provided. 

The repair shop is fitted with an engine lathe, a speed drill, 
a set of machinist's and carpenter's tools and a stock of shop 
supplies. This room is used for the repair and manufacture of 
apparatus. 

The photographic laboratory is equipped with cameras and 
other appliances, dark rooms, skylights, screens, and back 
grounds for portrait and copying work, and water facilities. 
The equipment enables the carrying forward of a very practical 
course in photography in its various applications. 

The following courses are offered by the department: 

Course I. — Mechanics and Heat. — First term, and 

Course II. — Electricity and Magnetism and Light and Sound. 
— Second term. Two lectures, one recitation and one laboratory 
per week. Mathematics IV, V and VI required. 

In the first term of this course the study of mass, force, 
energy, and power is emphasized and special attention is given to 



230 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the graphic methods of solving problems in force-actions, veloci- 
ties, etc. A portion of this term is also given over to the discus- 
sion of radiation in general and wave motion. The other general 
topics are then taken up according to the outline given above. 

The laboratory work is kept parallel to the text-book and 
lecture work and enables the emphasizing and fixing of the 
fundamental conceptions. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students in the 
course of domestic science. The breadth of the course together 
with the emphasis which is placed upon the essentials, adapt it to 
the needs of teachers and others who desire a general training 
in physics. Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course III. — Mechanics and Heat. — First term, and 

Course IV. — Electricity and Magnetism and Light and Sound. 
— Second term. Two lectures and three recitations per week. 
Mathematics IV, V and VI required. 

This course is designed for engineering and general science 
students, although it is open to others who are properly prepared 
for the work. As in Course I, much stress is placed upon the 
fundamental principles of the work and in addition thereto a 
more thorough study of vector quantities and their graphical 
treatment is made. 

A view of the subject from the methematical standpoint is 
emphasized and the student is urged to familiarize himself with 
the theoretical side of the question, as it is believed that such a 
foundation is very helpful if not absolutely essential to the work 
which follows. Text-book, Hastings and Beach, "General Phy- 
sics." Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course V. — Elementary Work in Mechanics and Heat. — For 
students in Agriculture. Three hours per week. First term. 

In Mechanics and Heat special attention is given to force 
action and the expenditure of energy. Energy transformation, 
heats of fusion and vaporization and specific heats are emphasized 
keeping in view the bearing of the various principles upon prac- 
tical agriculture. Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course VI. — Electricity and Magnetism. — Three hours per 
week. First term. Physics III and IV and Mathematics IX 
required. 

Lectures, recitations and problem work. A course in the 
elementary theory of electricity and magnetism. Discussion of 
measuring instruments and laboratory methods of measuring the 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 23] 

various electrical quantities. Text-book, Nichols and Franklin, 
"Elements of Physics," Vol. II. Professor Lanphear. 

Course IX. — Theory and Practice of Photography. — Class 
room and laboratory work, one hour each per week. First term. 
Open to upper classmen only, upon recommendation by the head 
of the department in which the student takes his major work. 

In the class room work is given a discussion of the optics and 
chemistry of photography. The manipulation of the negative 
and positive under the various processes to which it is subjected 
is also presented and the laboratory work is planned to give the 
student some skill in carrying forward the various methods of 
practical photography. The student is given practice in develop- 
ing over and under exposed negatives, in copying and enlarging 
work, etc. Mr. Tuttle. 

Course X. — Dynamo Electric Machinery. — Four hours per 
week. Second term. Prerequisite: Physics VI. Professor Lan- 
phear. 

Course XI. — Alternating Currents. — Four hours per week. 
First term. Physics X required. Professor Spinney. 

Course XII. — Applied Electricity. — Four lectures per week. 
Second term. Physics XI required. Professor Spinney. 

Course XIV. — General Physical Laboratory . — Two afternoons 
per week. First term, or 

Cox:rse XIVA. — One afternoon per week, First term. 

Measurement of length, mass, and time, determination of 
physical constants, use of the barometer, thermometry, calorim- 
etry, etc. Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course XV. — Physical Laboratory, Elementary Electrical 
Measurements. — One afternoon per week, Second term, or 

Course XVI. — Two afternoons per week, First term, or 
• urse XVII. — Two afternoons per week, Second term. 

The measurement of the electro-motive force and internal 
resistance of primary and secondary batteries, the use of Wheat- 
stone's bridge, measurement of current, determination of galva- 
nometer constants, high resistance measurements and insulation 
tests, etc. Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course XVIII. — Physical Laboratory, Electrical Testing. — 
Two afternoons per week, First Term, or 

Course XIX. — Two afternoons per week, Second Term. Pro- 
fessor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 



232 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Couese XX. — Physical Laboratory. — Dynamo, motor and 
commercial plant testing. Three afternoons per week, First Term. 
Professor Lanphear and Mr. Mereness. 

Course XXI. — Physical Laboratory. — Laboratory study of 
alternating currents two afternoons per week, Second Term, Sen- 
ior year. Professor Spinney and Mr. Mereness. 

Couese XXII. — Electric Circuits. — Two lectures per week, 
Second Term. Physics VI required. Professor Lanphear. 

Couese XXIII. — Electrical Designing. — Batteries, commercial 
ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, etc. One afternoon per week, 
Second Term, Junior year, and 

Couese XXIV. — Electrical Designing. — Two afternoons per 
week, First Term, Senior year. The design of dynamos, motors, 
transformers, etc. Professor Lanphear. 

Couese XXV. — Electrical Designing. — Three afternoons per 
week, Second Term, Senior year. Continuation of Course XXIV. 
Professor Lanphear. 

Couese XXVI. — Thesis in Electrical Engineering begun, and 

Couese XXVII. — Thesis in Electrical Engineering, finished 
Total equivalent of four hours per week for one term. 

Couese XXVIII. — Thesis in Physics. 

For a discussion of Courses X to XIII, XVIII to XXVII and 
XXIX to XXXII, see the Course in Electrical Engineering. 

The department offers thesis work in general physics, in heat, 
in light and sound, and in electricity and magnetism to students 
in other than the engineering courses. 

Courses III and IV and Courses X to XV are designed especi- 
ally for engineering students. Courses III, IV, XIV, XV, XVI and 
XVII are, however, open to other students as electives. 

A fee of $5.00 per term is charged for Courses XIV, XVI, 
XVII, XVIII, XIX, XX and XXI. For Course XV the fee is $3.00. 

If the student elects but one hour the fee is $3.00. 

The fee for Course IX is $3.00. 

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 

ALFEED ALLEN BENNETT, FEOFESSOE. 

L. A. PLACEWAY, F. O. EDGETT, E. C. M'KINNEY, H. R. WATKINS, 

INSTEUCTOES. 

The study of chemistry begins in the Sophomore Year with all 
students, excepting those in the courses in Veterinary Science and 
in General and Domestic Science, who begin their work the first 
semester of the Freshman Year. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 233 

METHODS AND OBJECT OF INSTRUCTION. 

The aim of the instruction in Chemistry is to develop in the 
student the inductive and experimental method of study, to 
excite in him an appreciation and love for true experimentation 
and to train his powers for inductive thinking, thus laying a 
foundation for technical or applied Chemistry. 

The method of study is, therefore, distinctively the labora- 
tory method. On the average, the student employs two hours of 
time in laboratory study for every hour of recitation. This pro- 
portion of time for the two divisions of work is especially carried 
out in the earlier part of the class study. The class room work 
aims to fix in the mind of the student chemical principles and 
facts based upon what has been learned by the actual handling 
and study of chemical substances. 

The work is arranged in courses, the course referring to the 
pursuit of a division of the subject for one term without regard 
to the number of hours per week that may be devoted to it. 
Three hours of laboratory study is equivalent to one hour of reci- 
tation. 

DESCRIPTION OP COURSES OP STUDY. 

The work is conveniently grouped under the following gen* 
eral heads: (a) General and Descriptive Chemistry; (b) Analy- 
tical Chemistry, Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis; (c) 
Organic Chemistry; (d) Studies in Applied Chemistry. 

(a) General and Descriptive Chemistry includes an elemen- 
tary study of the non-metallic and metallic elements, their his- 
tory, occurrence, preparation, properties and their principal com- 
pounds. In order better to train his powers of observation the 
student is required to describe the apparatus used and the phe- 
nomena produced, and to trace the relation of the results obtained 
to laws and principles. 

The different courses in General and Descriptive Chemistry 
are arranged to meet, as far as is practicable, the special needs 
of the students of the various departments. However, it is recog- 
nized that at this stage of the work the Science of Chemistry 
is the student's most practical acquisition. 

(b) Analytical Chemistry, both Qualitative and Quantitative, 
is taken up in an elementary way at first and may be followed by 
courses in more advanced work. After this preliminary knowledge 
is obtained, the direction of the work will depend to a great extent 



234 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

on the degree the student is aiming to obtain. For the degree in 
Agriculture the analytical study is directed to an examination of 
those substances of agricultural interest, and to prepare the stu- 
dent for an intelligent use of the scientific data upon which agri- 
culture is founded. In any case the purpose is to study Applied 
Chemistry from the standpoint of its fundamental principles. 

In the recitations, methods of analysis are described and dis- 
cussed and the study of the theoretical chemistry carried forward. 
In this work, courses of study are arranged for graduate as well 
as for under-graduate students. 

(c) In Organic Chemistry, courses are offered for the first 
degree and also as major and minor for graduate students. 

The course required of the students of the Veterinary Depart- 
ment is of an elementary nature and is intended to give a suffi- 
cient knowledge of the subject to lay the foundation for the 
study of Physiological Chemistry which follows. The latter course 
considers the chemical changes going on in the living animal 
body; the essential composition of foods and the changes through 
which they pass in the animal economy; the chemistry of the 
secretion and excretion. The laboratory study is devoted to the 
three principal food constituents and to urine analysis. 

The undergraduate in the division of Agriculture under the 
topic Organic Chemistry, studies in addition to the general prin- 
ciples of the subject, the chief food substances, i. e., the carbo- 
hydrates, fats, and proteids, poisonous substances found in the 
organic world, such as the alkaloids, ptomaines; the chemistry of 
milk and of the manufacture of butter and cheese. In a word, 
the student will consider, as completely as the time allotted ta 
the subject will allow, the important questions that concern 
agriculture from the chemical standpoint. 

To under-graduate students in the Division of Science is 
given a fairly complete outline of the theory of the structure and 
formation of organic compounds, but special attention is given 
to those compounds that are of commercial importance. In the 
laboratory the student prepares man}' of the more important 
manufactured organic substances, such as alcohol and soaps, and 
makes a special study of vinegars, sugar, petroleum and its pro- 
ducts, glycerine, etc. 

With this work as a foundation the graduate student selects 
some feature or features for more complete study. The amount 
and character of the work is left for arrangement between the 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 235 

individual and the head of the department. However, this will 
embrace such work as the analysis and study of foods, oils, fats, 
and the methods of preparation, purification, and adulteration of 
commercial organic substances. 

(d) It is recognized among persons whose opinions are 
worthy of consideration that the application of any science to the 
problems of life can be profitably taken up by the student only 
after a thorough grounding in the principles upon which the 
science rests. The purpose of the preliminary courses in this 
subject is to give this training as completely as possible. 

Some eighteen courses of study in applied chemistry are offer- 
ed, or are required of the students for the various degrees open 
to them. In the nature of the case, this work is essentially 
quantitative analysis and consists of courses in the analysis of 
Agricultural products', Fuel and Gas Analysis; Blowpipe Analy- 
sis; Assaying and Metallurgy; Chemistry of the Household; The 
Preparation of Organic and Inorganic Compounds. 

The courses in Agricultural Analysis will include both in- 
organic and organic substances; such as: soils, fertilizers, water, 
fodders and dairy products. This work will be open to under- 
graduate and graduate students, i. e.: the latter class of students 
will carry forward the work begun in the usual college courses. 

The course in Fuel and Gas Analysis will consist of the study 
of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, in reference to their composi- 
tion, and to their relative economic values. The student may 
devote the time of this course, principally, to technical analysis. 
Although the work is largely done in the laboratory it will be 
supplemented by lectures and recitations. The standard forms 
of apparatus will be used. 

The principles and methods of quantitative analysis learned 
in the elementary course will be applied in the advanced work 
to the analysis of various organic and inorganic substances, such 
as foods, iron and steel. The application of the facts of Electro- 
chemistry to the quantitative analysis of ores, and in the manu- 
facture of chemicals will be studied in an elementary manner. 

Quantitative Analysis by the "fire methods" is applied to 
gold, silver, copper and lead ores. This work is introduced by 
a blowpipe study of minerals, and is intended to support and sup- 
plement the subject of Descriptive Mineralogy and Crystallog- 
raphy which are studied in the Department of Geology. 



236 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

The study of Metallurgy will consider the chemical changes 
going on in the separation of the principal metals of the indus- 
tries and the assaying of metallurgical substances by wet process. 
This will include the chemical changes in the ores, fluxes, and 
fuels, occuring during the processes in the preparation of metals, 
and also the quantitative analysis of such substances. The sub- 
ject is considered in lectures, recitations and laboratory practice. 
The courses in chemical preparations will include the formation 
of pure and commercial articles from raw materials, and the com- 
mon adulterations of these products. 

The Chemistry of the Household considers the elementary 
chemistry of the principal food materials, changes produced in 
them during cooking and digestion, of cleaning and of adultera- 
tion of the chief food substances. 

This course can be accompanied by a laboratory study of 
soaps, soap preparations, sugars, syrups, vinegars, and baking 
powders. It must be preceded by a course in elementary quan- 
titative analysis. 

The work in Water Analysis covers a study of the methods 
employed, namely the so-called mineral and sanitary analysis, and 
the interpretation of these results, especially from the standpoint 
of the household, and for use in boilers in the production of 
steam. Methods of purification of water and a study of sewage 
will receive attention. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

FIRST TERM. 

Course I. — Elementary Inorganic Chemistry. — Recitations 
two hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Veterinarians. 
Freshmen. 

Course III. — General Chemistry. — Recitations, three hours. 
Laboratory practice two afternoons. Engineers, Sophomores. 

Course V. — Quantitative Analysis. — Recitations, three hours. 
Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Continuation of Course II. 
Junior or Senior year. 

Course X. — Elementary Organic Chemistry. — Lectures two 
hours. For students in the Veterinary Department only. Junior 
year. 

Course XI. — Quantitative Analysis. Recitations, two hours. 
Laboratory practice, three afternoons. Junior and Senior years. 
Must be preceded by Courses II and V or III and VI. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 237 

Corns i : XIV. — Organic Chemistry. Five hours. A contin- 
uation of Course IX. Work subject to arrangement by head of 
department and student. Senior year, or as a major or minor 
graduate study. 

Course XVI. — Chemistry of the Household. Sixteen lectures. 
Senior year. Must be preceded by Courses XXII, XXIV and IX. 
Offered to students of science as related to the industries, and 
in domestic science. 

Course XVI (a). — This course is to accompany Course XVI 
and is wholly laboratory study. Senior year. Must be pre- 
ceded by Courses XXII. XXIV, IX and XI. Domestic Science 
students, one or tvoo afternoons. 

Course XVII. — Fuel and Gas Analysis. Three hours. Elec- 
tive for students of Division of Science. Courses II, V and IX, 
required. Major or minor graduate study. 

Course XVIII. — Electro-chemistry. Three hours. Senior 
year. Elective for students of Division of Science. Courses II 
and V required. Major or minor graduate study. 

Courses XXI, XXIII, XXV, XXVI, XXVII, XXVIII, and 
XXIX are for students in the Agricultural Division, which see. 

Course XXII. — Elementary Chemistry. Recitations three 
hours. Laboratory practice two afternoons. G. D. S. students. 
Freshmen. 

Course XXX. — Continuation of Course XII. — Two hours — 
Mostly laboratory practice. Senior year. Courses II, V and XII 
required when elected by Division of Science students. Required 
of Mining Engineering students. 

Course XXXIII. — Qualitative Analysis. Continuation of 
Course V. Recitation two hours. Laboratory practice two or 
three afternoons. Elective Junior or Senior years. Division of 
Science. 

SECOND TERM. 

Course II. — General Chemistry. Recitations, three hours. 
Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Sophomore year. Division 
of Science Courses. 

Course IV. — General Chemistry (Metals.) Recitations, two 
hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Freshmen. Veter- 
inary Science students only. 

Course VI. — Qualitative Analysis. Recitations, three hours. 
Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Continuation of Course III. 



238 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Couese VII. — Blowpipe Analysis. Recitations, two, and lab- 
oratory practice three afternoons for one-naif semester. Re- 
quired of Mining Engineering students, and elective for students 
of Division of Science. Junior year. Courses II and V, or III 
and VI, required. 

Course VIII. — Assaying. Recitations, two hours, and lab- 
oratory practice, three afternoons for one-half semester. Junior 
year. Required of Mining Engineering students. Elective for 
students in Division of Science. Junior year. Courses II and V. 
or III and VI, required. 

Course IX. — Organic Chemistry. Recitations, four hours. 
Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Junior or Senior years. 
Must be preceded by Courses II and V. 

Course XII. — Metallurgy. Lectures and recitations, one 
hour. Junior year. Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Re- 
quired of Mining Engineering students. Elective for students in 
Division of Science. Courses II, V, VII, and VIII required. 

Course XIII. — Physiological Chemistry. Recitations, two 
hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Junior and Senior 
years. Required for students in Veterinary Department. Elec- 
tive in Division of Science. Courses II, V and IX, required, 
when elected. 

Course XV. — Analysis of Foods. Three hours. Elective for 
students in Division of Science. Courses II, V and IX, required. 
Major or minor graduate study. 

Course XIX. — Water Analysis. Three hours. Senior 
year. Elective for students in Division of Science. Courses II, 
V and XI, required. Major or minor graduate study. 

Course XXIV. — Elementary Applied Chemistry. Recitations, 
three hours. Laboratory practice, two afternoons. G. D. S. stu- 
dents. Freshmen. 

Course XXXI. — Inorganic Preparations. Recitations, two 
hours. Laboratory practice, two or three afternoons. Courses 
II, V, required. Elective in Division of Science. 

Course XXXII. — Quantitative Analysis. — Continuation of 
Course XI. Recitation and Laboratory practice, four hours. 
Elective Junior or Senior years. Division of Science. 

Course XX. — Special Work in Chemistry for the Preparation 
of a Graduate Thesis. — This subject is usually selected along the 
line of applied chemistry. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 239 

Graduate students will be provided with work in Organic and 
Inorganic Chemistry extending through two years if desired. 

This subject is open as a major study to graduates of this and 
other colleges of equal standing who have pursued the study of 
chemistry for two years and who are by this prepared to carry 
on independent work in the various directions that may be ar- 
ranged by them and the head of the Department. The courses 
of study will be along the lines of Applied or Industrial Chemistry 
with a sufficient ground work of theoretrical study to give a 
rational explanation and conception of the processes involved. 
The work will include advanced analytical and synthetical chem- 
istry, i. e., a study of the methods of chemical analysis and of 
the preparation of organic and inorganic compounds of industrial 
and commercial inmortance. The graduate student will select 
work along some one of these general lines of study and will de- 
vote his time to this, supporting it by other necessary collateral 
study, and such research in the literature of the subject as the 
library facilities will permit. A good reading knowledge of the 
German language will be essential to good progress in the prose- 
cution of the w r ork. Minor subjects in this department will be 
arranged so as to help as much as is possible the major subjects 
selected in the other departments. 

EQUIPMENT AND ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The chemical department occupies two floors of the Physical 
Science building. This space is divided into eleven rooms, six 
of which are laboratories, the remainder being lecture, office, 
balance and store rooms. 

The laboratories contain working tables for one hundred 
and twenty students. In connection with each table in the main 
laboratories there are two lockers, and by an arrangement of 
classes the accommodation of the laboratories is increased to over 
two hundred. 

The assaying laboratory is fitted with slate-topped tables, for 
the accomodation of sixteen students. These tables are supplied 
with gas and air blast. This room also contains a complete 
supply of muffle and crucible furnaces for dry assaying. Gaso- 
line furnaces are employed, since they enable work to be done 
more rapidly and in less space than the older types of coke or 
other solid fuel furnaces. For quantitative chemical work the 



240 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

department is well supplied with accurate sets of weights and 
balances. 

The department is amply equipped with apparatus and chem- 
icals for all of the work outlined in the courses of study offered. 
Persons desiring to prepare themselves to become teachers of 
chemistry, analytical chemists, or those seeking a preparation 
for the study of medicine will find here good facilities for study. 
The expenses are only sufficient to cover the actual cost of the 
material used in the prosecution of the work. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

LOUIS HERMANN PAMMEL, PROFESSOR. 
R. E. BUCHANAN, ESTELLE FOGFL, H. S. FAWCETT, G. M. LUMMIS, 

T. S. HUNT, ASSISTANTS. 

The Department of Botany has temporary quarters on the 
first floor of Margaret Hall and in part of the annex. The botan- 
ical laboratory has an east and south exposure. The room is 
divided up into sections permitting instruction in Botany I and 
II as well as the advanced work. For this purpose we have ten 
research tables, five large laboratory tables and ten tables for 
the students in Botany I and II. The lecture room is in the west 
end of the room and has a seating capacity for sixty students. 
There are charts for the purpose of illustrations, and mounted 
specimens of weeds, diseases of plants, etc. There are twenty- 
five compound microscopes of the following makes: Bausch & 
Lomb, Zeiss, Leitz & Beck, microtomes, various accessories, and 
reagents for the purpose of doing cytological work. The bacter- 
iological laboratory has a general equipment consisting of the 
various forms of apparatus, Arnold's steam sterilizer, Koch's 
steam sterilizer, dry oven for dry sterilization, blood serum ster- 
ilizer, platinum needles, plate holders for plates, glass benches, 
for support of plates, Petri dishes, culture, leveling tripod, incu- 
bator, and thermo-regulator, etc. 

The Department of Botany offers excellent facilities, not 
only to the under-graduate students, but to the graduate students 
along the lines of economic botany. 

HERBARIUM. 

The various collections of the Department now amount to 
about 60,000 specimens. The herbarium is very full in plants 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 241 

from Iowa and the Mississippi Valley, besides having a large 
number of plants from the eastern states, California and Europe. 
The collection may be divided into the general phanerogamic 
herbarium which was started by Dr. C. E. Bessey and continued 
by Dr. Halsted, to which numerous specimens have been added 
during the last few years. 

The college contains an excellent collection of grasses, hav- 
ing material from every part of the state besides a very represen- 
tative collection from various parts of the United States and 
Europe. The general phanerogamic collection now contains 25,- 
000 specimens. The Parry collection contains between 22,000 
and 25,000 specimens. This was purchased at a considerable 
expense from Mrs. Parry. This collection contains hundreds of 
new species found by Dr. Parry on his collecting trips, and is 
especially rich in plants of California, Mexico and the Rocky 
Mountain region. Many of these specimens were collected before 
the advent of the railroad. Many of the specimens contained in 
the collection are type species and are thus invaluable. 

The Cryptogamic Collection comprises a large number of 
very valuable exsiccati. It contains, besides the Ravenel Fungi 
Americani Exsiccati, a rare collection of dried plants, the now 
equally rare Ellis' North American Fungi, the Von Thuemen 
Mycotheca Universalis, besides numerous smaller collections. 

Living Material. — This department obtains living material 
from the plants grown by the Department of Agriculture and 
Horticulture, the grounds of the latter being very rich in lig- 
neous plants from Europe, Asia and America. 

Course I. — Elementary Botany. — This course embraces a 
study of the morphology of flowering plants, the terms used in 
descriptive botany and the determination of simple flowering 
plants. Leavitt's Lessons and Gray's Manual are used as texts 
accompanied by lectures and specimens designed to illustrate the 
subject. The lecture work is supplemented by a thorough labora- 
tory course covering the chief points in elementary botany such as 
the germination of seed, the different plant members, root and 
shoot, and the lateral appendages, the leaves, the flower, the fruit 
and the seed. A brief outline of the vegetable kingdom beginning 
with the lower forms of plant life, bacteria, algae, mosses and 
ferns and the minute structure of plants supplemented with the 
study of the more common flowering plants found in the vicinity 
of Ames. A collection of fifty specimens of flowering plants is re- 

16 



242 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

quired. Excursions to some convenient point for the purpose of 
studying the native flora are obligatory. Academic year, second 
term; required of students in the Division of Agriculture and 
Division of Science. Recitations and laboratory. Two hours. 

Couese II. — Ecology. — A course in which the relations of 
plants to their environment are considered, the relations between 
insects and flowers, pollination by wind and other agencies. Dis- 
semination of plants by various agencies and the distribution of 
plants over the earth's surface and factors that influence dis- 
tribution; plant communities. Excursions are an essential feat- 
ure of this course. The laboratory course covers the work taken 
up in the lecture room. The more important fall plants are 
studied with reference to their pollination. Similar work is done 
on the dissemination of plants, and also a study of plants with 
reference to their environments. Required of students in the Di- 
visions of Agriculture, and Science. Recitations and laboratory. 
Two hours. 

Couese III. — Histology. — This course is designed as an ele- 
mentary one. Since students are unfamiliar with the use of the 
microscope they are taught the use of the same, beginning with 
very simple objects, such as an air bubble and cotton fibre, then 
passing on to a study of the cell with its contents, such as starch, 
protoplasm, nucleus, and crystals. The division of cells and 
nucleus are studied in light of modern investigations. The lab- 
oratory work supplements that of the class-room; the different 
organs and parts of a plant are taken up, not merely as histologi- 
cal structures but considered from a physiological standpoint. 
As an illustration, the cuticle, cuticularized and cellulose layers 
of the epidermal cells of an agave leaf are considered with ref- 
erence to their significance in preventing transpiration. The 
absorbing, assimilating, aerating and conducting system are con- 
sidered in the same way. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 
Required of students in the Division of Science, and in the Divi- 
sion of Agriculture. 

Couese IV. — Cryptogamic Botany. — The first term of the 
Sophomore year is devoted to the study of cryptogams from a 
systematic standpoint. Special attention is given to "rust," 
"smuts" and "mildews." The morphology and life history of the 
different groups of cryptogams are considered. Lectures and lab- 
oratory, with frequent excursions. Four hours. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 243 

Course V. — Vegetable Pathology comes in the first term, 
Senior year. In this course plant diseases of the farm, garden and 
horticultural crops are taken up. In this course, lectures on the 
more injurious of the fungous diseases of cultivated plants are 
considered in a more extended way than is possible in the Sopho- 
more year. The theory of immunity and prevention of diseases, 
rotation of crops and fungicides are considered. In this course 
the diseases are treated from the standpoint of the host plant. 
Two or five hours. 

Course VI. — Advanced Cryptogamic Botany. — This course 
embraces a study of the more important orders of cryptogams, 
especially with reference to the flora of Iowa. This course is 
offered to students in the Division of Agriculture in the Junior 
year, and the Division of Science in Junior and Senior years. 
Frequent excursions are obligatory. First term. 

Text Tubeuf, "Diseases of Plants," supplemented by lectures 
on the algae, fungi and lichens and reference to various publi- 
cations of the experiment stations and reports and bulletins of 
the United States Department of Agriculture. 

Course VII. — Bacteriology is an elective study for students 
in the Science Course, Junior year, but required of the Junior 
Veterinary, Agricultural and General and Domestic Science stu- 
dents. First and second terms. Required, first term, second 
year, two years' course Domestic Science. The laboratory work 
consists in studying some of the common germs and bacteriolo- 
gical technique. In the lectures special attention is given to 
sanitation and means of preventing contagious diseases. Because 
of the radical difference in many diseases between man and ani- 
mals the work is taken up in two divisions, one considering its 
relation to human health and hygiene, and the general subject of 
making media, sterilization, biology and classification of bac- 
teria. Text, Abbott's Bacteriology is used. Two hours. 

Course VIII. — Advanced Bacteriology. — This is an elective 
in the Senior year in which special attention is given to a study 
of water and micro-organisms. The work is in advance of that 
done in the Junior year. It is intended especially for persons who 
intend to enter a professional life either along the lines of sani- 
tary engineering or other professions. Sedgwick, "Principles of 
Sanitary Science and the Public Health" with special reference 
to the causation of diseases, Muir and Ritchie, "Manual of Bac- 
teriology" are used. Three hours. 



244 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course IX. — Structural Botany.— This course begins in the 
first term of the Freshman year. The work consists of recitations 
and lectures. The student is expected to become familiar with 
the morphology of flowering plants and the terms used in descrip- 
tive botany. In the study of identification and selection of drugs 
it is necessary to have a thorough botanical knowledge of general 
structural botany as well as vegetable histology. Vegetable 
drugs not only consist of the entire plant but frequently of only 
parts. In this course the general structure of the plant from the 
root to reproductive organs, is taken up and considered. In the 
laboratory the student takes up the histology of plants especially 
from the standpoint of pharmacognosy, with a brief survey of the 
more important plants from a systematic standpoint. Three 
hours. Two recitations and one laboratory. 

Course X. — Economic Botany. — In this course special atten- 
tion is given to a microscopic study of foods. The principal 
cereals and food plants are studied with reference to their general 
and minute structure as it gives to the student a general idea of 
the nature of vegetable foods as well as the reserve material of 
plants and the systematic position of our economic plants, where 
they originated and where chiefly cultivated. First term, Junior 
year. Lectures and laboratory work. Two hours. 

Course XI. — Vegetable Physiology. — A course of lectures with 
demonstrations on the functions of plants, nutrition, growth, 
movements and reproduction of higher plants. Lectures and 
recitations. Second term, Senior year. Two or five hours. 

Course XII. — Vegetable Cytology and Micro-technique. — A 
study of the cell and its divisions in lower cryptogams and higher 
plants. The use of reagents and staining, methods of sectioning 
and mounting. Recitation and laboratory work. Second term, 
Senior. Three or five hours. 

Course XIII. — Agrostology. — This course is an elective one. 
It is intended to give the student a general idea of some of the 
more important grasses, not only with reference to their botanical 
position, but also with reference to their economic uses, especially 
meadow and pasture grasses; the cereal food products, grasses in 
medicine, grasses as soil binders, and grasses for lawn and lawn 
making. Lecture and laboratory work. First term, Senior. Two 
hours. 

Course XIV. — Seeds and Seed Testing. — A short course em- 
bodying the principles of seed testing is given. The principal 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 245 

agricultural weed seeds and their detection in commercial seeds, 
as well as the structural characters of the more important com- 
mercial seeds are studied. The germinative energy of various 
seed and such other features as are important in connection with 
seed testing are considered. First term, Senior. Two hours. 

Course XV. — General Systematic Phanerogams. — This course 
consists of lectures and laboratory work on the more important 
orders of flowering plants, especially with reference to the flora 
of North America. Definite systems of classification, Prelinnaean, 
Linnaean, and post Linnaean. In the laboratory each student is 
assigned some special group of plants to work up. The synonymy 
of the species of plants studied by him are looked up. Frequent 
excursions are obligatory. Second term, Junior. Three or five 
hours. 

Course XVI. — Poisonous Plants. — The veterinarian is fre- 
quently called on to investigate poisoning. He should therefore 
be familiar with the plants responsible for poisoning live stock. 
In this course the subject is treated from the historical stand- 
point, brief reference to the history of toxicology, auto-intoxica- 
tion, poisoning from ptomaines, toxines and agents responsible 
for such poisoning. Poisoning by fungi like toadstools, and ergot. 
Dwelling on life history of these fungi and the poisons they pro- 
duce. The rusts and smuts as possible causes of disease. The 
higher plants are then taken up in a systematic order, calling 
attention to the poisonous plants in the various orders and means 
for recognizing these plants. Lectures and laboratory work. 
Second term, Freshman. Two hours. 

Course XVII. — Advanced Cryptogamic Botany. Ferns. — A 
course is offered in advanced cryptogamic botany in which only 
the vascular cryptogams are taken up. In this course principal 
attention will be given to the study of the chief types of ferns in 
this state and in the United States and the general distribution 
of ferns and their development. The ferns are frequently cul- 
tivated and they are objects of interest to every lover of the study 
of the science of botany. Three hours. 

Course XVIII. — Botanical Seminar. — There has been organ- 
ized at the College in connection with botanical work, a Botanical 
Seminar. Here reviews of recent literature and topics of general 
interest are considerd, each member of the Seminar being as- 
signed a topic to report upon. The subjects are then discussed 



246 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

by the members. There are also special lecturers who consider 
certain topics related to botany. Seminar meets once a month 
during the College year. Senior year. One hour. 

During the past year the following topics were made the 
subject of special lectures: 

1. E. MacDonald Stanton. Ehrlich's Side-chain Theory. 

2. L. H. Pammel. Rocky Mountain Systematic Botany. 

3. Charlotte M. King. The Camera and Pen in Botanical 
Work. 

4. R. Earle Buchanan. The Fresh Water Algae of Iowa. 

5. G. M. Lummis and L. H. Pammel. Seeds and Seed Test- 
ing in America. 

6. Miss Ida Grillette and Prof. Scroggie. Teaching of Bot- 
any and Nature Study in Public Schools. 

7. Estelle D. Pogel. Iowan Cryptogams. 

Course XIX. — Evolution of Plants. — A course of lectures 
dealing with evolution as applied to plants, theories of evolution, 
heredity, origin of plant life, present and past distribution. Sen- 
ior year. One hour. 

Course XX. — Botanical Micro-chemistry. — In this work the 
student becomes familiar with the microscope and its parts; and 
the structure of cells and the substances contained therein, special 
attention being given to micro-chemistry. This work covers es- 
sentially the work given in Zimmermann's Botanical Micro-tech- 
nique. Lecture recitations and laboratory work. Second term, 
Junior. Five hours. 

Course XXI. — Cytology. — An advanced post-graduate course 
in cytology is offered. The student takes up work in advance of 
that given in Course XII, especial attention being given 
to developmental studies of higher plants and some of 
the cryptogams. This study can only be taken as a major in post- 
graduate work, the student also pursues a course of reading along 
with the laboratory work. Major work. 

Course XXII. — Systematic Botany. — The Department offers 
unusual facilities for doing systematic work, the collection being 
large and well supplied with type material in the way of Phaeno- 
gams from the Rocky Mountain and Pacific Coast. The student 
taking this course should be sufficiently familiar with the general 
relations of the flowering plants and be able to take up special 
orders. The student should be familiar with the modern systems 
of classification, especially those of Engler and Prantl, and Ben- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 247 

tham and Hooker. Courses are also offered in systematic work 
among the lower plants, the College having an unusually full 
collection in certain orders especially the economic, like Uredineae 
and Ustilagineae. Minor work. 

Course XXIII. — Advanced Morphology. — In this course the 
comparative anatomy of phanerogams as well as cryptogams is 
taken up, the student consulting such works as Gray, Engler, 
Eichler and DeBary. Minor work. 

Course XXIV. — Advanced Economic Botany. — The course in 
economic botany is offered as a post-graduate minor, and the 
student will take up such topics as the adulteration of foods, 
seeds, the germination of plants, the vitality of seeds, in fact any 
subject especially pertaining to agriculture and horticulture and 
forestry. Minor work. 

Course XXV. — Advanced Mycology. — The subject of mycology 
is offered as a minor in a post-graduate work, the student taking 
up the study of fungous diseases of cultivated and wild plants. 
Minor work. 

Course XXVI. — Bacteriology. — Is offered as a minor or major 
in post-graduate work. The student is expected to take up such 
subjects as sewage pollution of our waters, the examination of 
potable waters, the diseases of plants, fermentations. This 
course will not be given unless the prerequisite courses in bac- 
teriology have been taken. Minor or major work. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, PROFESSOR. 
MR. GUTHRIE, INSTRUCTOR. 

Equipment. — The laboratory is well supplied with the usual 
apparatus, including compound and dissecting microscopes, 
camera-lucidas, microtomes, incubators, paraffin baths, aquaria, 
etc. In the way of illustrative material, in addition to the 
general museum and the entomological collections described 
below, there is a large series of charts, a set of wax embryological 
models, lantern slides, mounted microscopic slides, disarticulated 
and articulated skeletons, and alcoholic preparations. 

The general museum consists of specimens selected with 
great care to show the variations of structure found in the 
various branches, classes and minor divisions of the animal 
kingdom. Porifera, coelenterata, vermes, echinodermata, arthro- 



248 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

poda, mollusca, and vertebrata are all amply represented by actual 
specimens and Blaschka glass models. It is especially rich, 
however, in representative birds and mammals. In addition to a 
good series of skeletons, there are over four hundred mounted 
skins, and eggs of three hundred species of birds, and over ninety 
mounted skins of mammals, the latter including such rare or 
peculiar forms as the echidna, ornithorhynchus, great kangaroo, 
kaola, wombat, sloth, great ant-eater, armadillo, manatee, peccary, 
camel, antelope, bison, Rocky mountain goat and sheep, elk, tapir, 
porcupine, beaver, fur seal, hedgehog, lemur and monkey. 

The collection of insects is very large, embracing about sixty 
thousand mounted specimens, including a large number of types. 
It includes the Van Duzee collection of Hemiptera, from Buffalo, 
New York, including the types of the numerous species described 
by him. There is also a large series of microscopic forms on 
slides, and a large amount of material illustrating life histories, 
especially of injurious insects. 

The work in zoology is designed, first, to give a knowledge 
of those biological laws, together with the data necessary for 
their thorough comprehension, which is today regarded as an 
essential part of a liberal education; secondly to furnish the 
requisite theoretical basis for an intelligent study of certain 
practical branches of stock breeding, dairying, human and veter- 
inary medicine, and economic entomology, which depend directly 
upon zoological principles; and, thirdly, to impart a knowledge 
of the facts and methods of investigation in the last of these 
practical subjects, namely, economic entomology. 

Course I. — Introductory Entomology . — This course is design- 
ed as an introduction to all the other work in the Department. 
Insects are used as convenient forms in giving a training in 
accurate observation, and in the methods of systematic and field 
zoology. Some training is also obtained in the use of the micro- 
scope. The work begins with a thorough study of the structure 
of the grasshopper and beetle, followed by the collection of insects 
and their classification. The life histories of certain selected 
forms are also traced. The lectures deal chiefly with those facts 
in the physiology and life history of insects that will best serve as 
a foundation for a knowledge of the general laws of animal life. 
One lecture and one laboratory exercise per week. Second term, 
Freshman year. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 249 

Course II. — Vertebrate Zoology. — A somewhat thorough study 
of the anatomy, including histology, of the Necturus serves as an 
introduction to the methods of gross dissection and gives practice 
in the use of the microscope. A comparison of the frog with the 
Necturus gives an opportunity to impart a knowledge of homo- 
logy, and an outline of the development of the same animal lays 
a foundation for the more extended study of vertebrate embryolo- 
gy in Course V. This is followed by a briefer study of other 
types, as amphioxus, lamprey, fish, turtle, bird and mammal. 
Throughout this course the relation of structure to function is 
kept constantly in view, the end being to give a conception of each 
animal as a living being. Three lectures and two laboratory 
exercises per week in the Science courses and three lectures and 
one laboratory exercise per week in the Agricultural and Veterin- 
ary courses. First term, Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Zoology I. 

Couese III. — Invertebrate Zoology. — A continuation of the 
preceding course, devoted to the morphology, physiology, and 
especially the ecology of selected types of the more important 
groups of invertebrates, including the amoeba, hydra, earth- 
worm, crawfish, and mussel. Especial attention is devoted to the 
Protozoa, a very full discussion being given in the lectures of the 
fundamental forms in which animal functions are exhibited in 
this group. Questions of phylogeny are quite fully discussed, 
thus laying a foundation for Course VI. Three lectures and two 
laboratory exercises per week in the Science courses and three 
lectures and one laboratory exercise per week in the Agricultural 
course. Second term, Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Zoology II. 

Course IV. — Applied Entomology. — A study of the structure, 
habits, life-histories and classification of insects with especial 
reference to economic species; designed to give to Agricultural 
students, especially those interested in Horticulture, a knowledge 
of the methods of combating injurious species. The course also 
serves as a foundation for independent investigation in Applied 
Entomology. Two lectures and three laboratory exercises per 
week. First term, Junior year. Prerequisite, Zoology I. 

Course V. — Embryology. — The laboratory work is devoted to 
a study of the development of the frog and of the chick from 
preparations made largely by the student, supplemented by others 
furnished for comparison by the instructor. The methods of 
making reconstructions from serial sections are learned. In 
the lectures the general principles of development are discussed. 



250 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

beginning with the structure of the germ cells, maturation and 
fertilization, and tracing the modifications of cleavage and gas- 
trulation found in the different classes of vertebrates. Two lec- 
tures and one to three laboratory exercises per week. First term, 
Junior year. Prerequisite, Zoology II. 

Course VI. — Evolution of Animals. — A discussion of the prob- 
lems and factors of organic evolution; heredity, variation, origin 
and distribution of life, etc. One lecture per week. Second 
term, Senior year. Prerequisites, Zoology II and III and Geology 
II. 

Course VII. — Comparative Anatomy. — Advanced work in con- 
tinuation of Courses II and III. Second term, Junior year. 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Zoology II, III and V. 

Course VIII. — Animal Parasites. — A course of lectures, illus- 
trated by numerous specimens, upon the more injurious parasites 
of domestic animals. Intended primarily for students of veterin- 
ary medicine. Second term, Junior year. Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, Zoology II. 

Course IX. — Advanced Entomology. — Special individual lab- 
oratory work in continuation of Course IV, intended for those 
who expect to pursue entomology as a profession. The exact 
nature of the work in each case will depend upon the ability and 
special object of the student. Three to five laboratory exercises 
per week. First or second term. Junior or Senior year. Prere- 
quisite, Zoology III and IV. 

Course X. — Morphology. — Special individual work in contin- 
uation of Courses II, III, V and VII, designed especially for those 
who expect to become teachers and investigators in zoology and 
who are writing their thesis in this department. The work will 
be given a leaning toward general vertebrate or invertebrate 
morphology, embryology or taxonomy depending upon the inclin- 
ation of the student. Three to five hours per week, mainly labor- 
atory. First or second term, Senior year. Prerequisite, Zoology 
V and VII. 

Course XI. — Neurology. — A course in the comparative mor- 
phology of the vertebrate nervous system, with especial attention 
to the physiological anatomy of the human brain. Two lectures 
and one to three laboratory exercises per week. First term, Sen- 
ior year. Prerequisite, Zoology II, III and V. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 251 

Course XII.— Human Physiology.— A course of lectures, with 
demonstrations and laboratory work, on the chief functions of the 
human body, and on the laws of health. The physiology and 
hygiene proper are preceded by a study of mammalian anatomy, 
including histology. Two lectures and one laboratory exercise 
per week. First term, Sophomore year. Three hours. Prerequi- 
site, Chemistry III or Agricultural Chemistry XXIII. 

Course Xlli. — Human Physiology. — A continuation of Course 
I. Two lectures and one laboratory exercise per week. Second 
term, Sophomore year. Three hours. Prerequisite, Physiology I. 

Advanced Human Physiology. — It is expected that a year's 
advanced work in Human Physiology from three to five hours 
weekly will be offered in 1903-4. Courses XII and XIII will be a 
prerequisite for this advanced work. 

In addition to the above, special courses will be laid out for 
students intending to write a thesis in zoology, and also for 
graduate students in continuation of the lines of work that they 
pursued as under-graduates. Special facilities will be offered 
such students for research work. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, PROFESSOR. 
I. A. WILLIAMS, INSTRUCTOR. 

The work of the department is carried on by means of recita- 
tions, lectures, conferences, laboratory work and numerous field 
excursions. The student is not only afforded an opportunity to 
gain some familiarity with the principles and theories discussed 
in the leading text-books, but is encouraged to test the theories 
and verify the principles discussed in the class-room. Field ex- 
cursions, with carefully written reports thereon are required in 
all of the courses in Geology. 

EQUIPMENT. 

i 

The Department of Geology shares quarters with the Depart- 
ment of Mining Engineering in Engineering Hall and it is un- 
necessary to repeat the description of rooms given on a preceding 
page. The working equipment consists of museum materials, 
field and laboratory instruments. 

The museum contains carefully selected series of fossils, 
minerals, rock and ores; all available for study purposes. Among 



252 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the more important collections in Geology and Mineralogy are: 
The educational series of rocks, collected by the United States 
Geological Survey; the Smithsonian collection of rocks and min- 
erals; the Rohn, Hodson and Young collections of rocks and ores 
from the Lake Superior region; the English mineral collection, 
containing 200 specimens and about 150 species; the Baltimore 
series of more than 200 specimens of rocks and minerals typical 
of the petrographic province of Baltimore; the Cushing collection 
from Clinton County, New York; and a considerable amount of 
material to illustrate the physical features of rocks and minerals. 

In paleontology, the Calvin collection of paleozoic fossils; a 
large collection of Coastal Plain fossils, principally from the 
Cretaceous of New Jersey, the Eocene of Alabama and Maryland, 
and the Miocene of Maryland and Virginia; the Permo-Carbonifer- 
ous series from Kansas and Russia; and the coal plants of Iowa, 
Illinois and Pennsylvania are the most important. 

In applied geology the Department possesses comprehensive 
series of lead and zinc ores with their characteristic gangue 
materials from Joplin, Missouri, and from the Iowa-Wisconsin 
area; copper and iron from the Lake Superior region and from 
the celebrated localities in the Ural Mountains; copper, manganese 
and silver from Butte, Montana; lead and silver from Colorado, 
Nevada and California. 

Aside from the collections enumerated, Dr. H. Foster Bain, 
formerly of the Iowa Geological Survey, has kindly loaned to the 
department his extensive private collection of rocks and minerals; 
and the Le Grand Quarry Company generously donated a splendid 
series of building blocks from their quarries which exhibit the 
various styles of stone dressing. 

The laboratory is supplied with four Bausch and Lomb petro- 
graphical microscopes; one Fuess, medium model, latest pattern 
petrographical microscope. All of the instruments are well sup- 
plied with accessories; one Ward mineral dresser, one hand 
goniometer; one set Preston's celluloid crystal models; one set 
Krantz selected wood models exhibiting complicated forms; the 
Krantz collection of 120 thin sections of the common rock-form- 
ing minerals selected and arranged according to Rosenbusch, the 
collection selected to show the various representative characters 
of minerals and rocks; one section slicing machine, and complete 
apparatus for rock separations by heavy solutions; and is sup- 
plied with apparatus for doing all kinds of photographic work. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 253 

A considerable number of instruments of reconnoissance and 
field work in geology are owned by the Department. 

The lecture equipment comprises a Hitchcock's geological 
map of the United States; one set of Kiepert's physical maps; 
numerous maps and charts of the U. S. Geological Survey and of 
the Mississippi River Commission and an elaborate series of 
lantern slides and photographs. 

COURSES IN GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

Eight courses are offered in Geology and Mineralogy. Physio- 
graphy is required in the Divisions of Science and Agriculture; 
Courses II, IV to VII, inclusive, are required of students in Mining 
Engineering; Course III is elective to students in Civil Engineer- 
ing; Course IX is specially adapted to students in the Division of 
Agriculture, while Courses II to VIII, inclusive, are elective to all 
students in the Divisions of Agriculture and Science. 

Course I. — Physiography. — First term, Freshman, three hours 
per week; serves as an introduction to the Science of Geology. 
The first half of the term is devoted to the study of the agents 
which have to do with modifying the earth's crust, while the 
resultant earth features receive careful consideration during the 
second half of the term. Davis' or Tarr's Elements of Physical 
Geography is the text-book used. Required in the Divisions of 
Science and Agriculture. 

Course II. — General Geology. — Five hours per week first half 
year. This course embraces a discussion of the principles which 
form the ground work of the science. The first ten weeks are 
devoted to dynamic and structural geology and the last six to 
stratigraphic and historical geology. The student is required to 
make several excursions to points of geological interest to verify 
the more salient facts discussed in the class room. 

Prerequisites. — The elementary courses in physics, chemistry 
and zoology. Required of students in Mining Engineering; elec- 
tive in the divisions of Agriculture and Science. 

Course III. — The same as Course II for the first half term, 
but only three hours per week during the last half of the term. 
The second half is devoted to a study of the pronerties, mode of 
occurrence, origin and distribution of the more important struc- 
tural materials. Elective to students in Civil Engineering. 

Course IV. — Advanced Geology. — Five hours per week, second 
term, Senior year. The nature, mode of occurrence and origin 



254 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

of the minerals and rocks which constitute the earth's crust are 
considered in some detail during the first half of the term, while 
rock alteration as involved in metamorphism and weathering 
receives special attention during the second half. Excursions are 
continued as in II, and students are encouraged to familiarize 
themselves with the methods employed in doing research work 
and to make independent observations. 

Prerequisites. — Course II. Open to students in the divisions 
of Agriculture and Science. 

Coukse V. — Economic Geology. — Three hours per week, sec- 
ond term, Senior year. This course embraces a discussion of the 
general features and formation of ore bodies, followed by a des- 
cription of the distribution and the occurrence of coal and the 
more important hydro-carbons, building stones, potable waters, 
salines and other products of economic importance. 

Prerequisites. — Courses II, VI and VII. Required of students 
in Mining Engineering. 

Couese VI. — Mineralogy. — Two hours class room and one 
hour laboratory, second half, Junior year. This course is intend- 
ed to give the student a clear idea of the morphological and phy- 
sical properties of crystalline substances. 

Prerequisites. — Elementary courses in physics, chemistry and 
mathematics. Required in the Mining Engineering course and 
optional in the Division of Science. 

Couese VII. — Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy. — 
Two hours' class room and one hour laboratory in the first term, 
Senior year. This term's work is devoted to the study of the 
more important mineral species, their properties, uses, distribu- 
tion and methods of determination. Required in the Mining 
Engineering course and elective in the Division of Science. 

Couese VIII. — Petrography. — Two hours per week during the 
second term, Senior year, and is essentially a laboratory course. 
It embraces a short course in the microscopic study of rocks. 

Prerequisites. — Courses VI and VII. Required of students in 
the Mining Engineering course. 

Couese IX. — Agricultural Geology. — Open to students in the 
Division of Agriculture, second term, Sophomore year, and counts 
three hours. The origin, mineralogy and physiography of soils 
with attendant problems are treated as fully as the time will per- 
mit. 



DIVISION OF BCIENCE 255 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC SCIENCE. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, RROEESSOR. 
MR. HIBBARD, INSTRUCTOR. 

It is the aim and purpose of this department to train the 
student to observe and study the general facts of industry; econ- 
omic theory being presented as the formulated truths of industrial 
life. 

Course I. — Outlines of Economics. — Two text books are used, 
Ely's "Outlines of Economics" and Cheyney's "Introduction to the 
Social and Industrial History of England." These are supple- 
mented by lectures and class reports on topics of special import- 
ance, such as: the use of gold and silver as money in the United 
States; the history of the greenback; co-operative movements; 
labor organizations; and, near the close of the term, the develop- 
ment of the leading industries in the United States is sketched 
in a series of ten or twelve lectures. Required of Mechanical and 
Electrical Engineers; elective for Science, General and Domestic 
Science, and Agricultural students. Five hours per week. First 
term, Junior year. The course is repeated in the second term and 
required of Juniors in Civil Engineering. 

Course II. — History of Political Economy. — Elective for 
Juniors or Seniors who have taken Course I. The development of 
economic thought, and incidentally economic life, are traced his- 
torically from ancient times to the present, special emphasis 
being given to the period from the Physiocrats to John Stuart 
Mill. This is a lecture course, supplemented by assigned topics. 
Twice a week. First term. 

Course III. — Economic Problems. — Elective for Seniors who 
have had Course I. Several weeks are spent in a study of trusts 
and monopolies by means of lectures and class reports. During the 
latter part of the term a careful study is made of socialism and 
kindred topics, using as a text Ely's "Socialism and Social Re- 
form," supplemented by references to other authoritative treatises, 
such as, "Contemporary Socialism," Rae; "History of Socialism," 
Kirkup; "Quintessence of Socialism," Schaeffle. Three hours per 
week. First term. 

Course IV. — Money and Banking. — Elective for those who 
have had Course I. White's "Money and Banking" used as a text. 
The demand for a course of this kind has led to its introduction 



256 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

and hereafter it will be offered as a regular elective for Juniors 
and Seniors. An attempt is made to trace the principles of money 
and banking as they have been developed in different countries 
and as they now exist. Two hours per week. Second term. 

Couese V. — Finance. — Elective for those who have had Course 
I. The science of finance is recognized as one of the leading 
branches of economics, and must be studied by one who would 
understand the functions of the state. Taxation is given special 
prominence. Adams' "Science of Finance" is used as the basis 
of this course, with references and comparisons to Ely's "Taxa- 
tion in American States and Cities," Cohn's "Science of Finance," 
works by Seligman, etc. Three hours per week. Second term. 

DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

MARY A. SABIN, PROFESSOR. 
£ MISS WILLIAMS, MISS MERRITT AND MISS BARBER, ASSISTANTS. 

The widespread interest in Domestic Economy springs 
largely from the increasing attention accorded to all social prob- 
lems. The importance of the home as a social factor is para- 
mount; and the application of science and of the scientific method 
to household management is coming to be regarded as a necessity. 
It is not surprising therefore that the study of the home, its func- 
tion, its administration, its sanitary conditions, the preparation 
of foods, and a score of kindred topics should find place in the 
courses of instruction in colleges and universities. The study of 
Domestic Economy is profitable not only because of its practical 
worth, but because of its educative value. Many sciences find 
direct application in the operations of housekeeping; it is conse- 
quently the aim of this Department to present this home-study in 
such a way as to apply the knowledge gained in related and asso- 
ciated sciences. This study seeks at every point the health, con- 
venience and comfort of the members of the household, and by 
its utility to add to the value of the well kept home. 

Domestic Economy Hall adjoins Margaret Hall and includes 
the general office, the sewing-room, fitting-room, bed-room, labora- 
tory kitchen, dining-room, and store-rooms, all conveniently 
furnished and equipped for recitations and for demonstrations 
and practice work. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 257 

The methods of instruction embrace the lecture system, text- 
book study, laboratory practice, demonstration lessons, class dis- 
cussions, presentation of topics on assigned subjects by individual 
members of the class, and expeditions for observation and criti- 
cism. By a judicious combining of theory and practice, 
the student gains a thorough understanding of the under- 
lying principles of Domestic Economy and at the same time 
acquires skill and deftness in execution. Upon completing a sys- 
tematic course in this Department a young woman is prepared to 
conduct her home successfully and with that ease which comes 
only through knowledge and experience. 

The work offered in Domestic Economy does not constitute 
a special and separate course of study, but is one of the several 
lines included in the general College course for all women students 
and subject to the usual regulations concerning entrance require- 
ments, classification, examinations and class records. 

Materials, tools and utensils for the laboratory work are 
furnished by the Department, and for the use of these, students 
pay in Sewing a fee of one dollar each term; and in Cooking three 
dollars each term. 

Four hours each week are devoted to recitation and practice 
in each of the several subjects included in Domestic Economy, 
one of which subjects is offered each term of the four years. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

Course II. — Foods. — This course familiarizes the student 
with the processes of cooking and with the principles underlying 
the cooking of proteids, carbohydrates and fats. The various food 
stuffs are taken up in the order of their simplicity of preparation. 
The pupil prepares many nourishing and appetizing dishes, and 
is trained at the same time in the points of accuracy, order and 
economy and in the general care of the kitchen and its utensils. 

The lectures in this Course deal with the various foods pre- 
pared in the laboratory and cover the following general topics: 
Chemical composition, nutritive value, function in the body, 
digestibility and cost. In connection with this a study is made of 
the most wholesome and scientific method of preparing the food 
under discussion. Freshman year, second term. Four hours. 

Course III. — Foods and Home Sanitation. — The special 
feature of this course is the combining and serving of foods. In 
connection with cooking, instruction and practice are given in 

'7 



258 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

marketing, carving, in the care of the dining room and its fur- 
nishings, in table setting and serving. From time to time break- 
fasts, luncheons and dinners are planned, prepared and served 
by the pupils. 

The lectures of this course deal with Home Sanitation. They 
treat of the site, surroundings and construction of the house; its 
plumbing, heating, lighting and ventilation. Sophomore year, 
first term. Pour hours. 

Course V. — Foods, Advanced Course. — In the Junior year 
opportunity is given for added practice in cooking. The foods 
which are taken up in this term's work require more elaborate 
preparation than is allowed in the time of the earlier courses, and 
include roasts, bread and rolls, sauces, salads, desserts and frozen 
foods, also canning and preserving. The specific foods prepared 
are determined by the need and desire of the students. 

One hour a week is given to a study of food materials, which 
are considered in greater detail than is possible in the preceding 
terms. A study is made of Milk, Butter and Cheese, Eggs, Meat, 
Fish, Vegetables, Bread, Fruit, Food Accessories and Beverages. 
Junior year, first term. Four hours. 

Course VIII. — Home Nursing', Laundering. — The last term's 
work in Domestic Science is devoted to Home Nurs- 
ing and Laundering. The work in Home Nursing is presented 
through lectures illustrated by practical demonstrations. This 
work is conducted by a trained nurse. Some time is given to 
invalid cookery and this in connection with the training in nurs- 
ing enables the young women to become intelligent nurses in 
their own homes. 

The course in Laundering comprises both the theoretical and 
practical sides. A study is made of cleansing processes, treat- 
ment of stains and practical laundering methods. In 
addition to these subjects the lectures in this course deal with the 
following topics: The organization of the household, expendi- 
tures, a study of family budgets, domestic service, pecuniary 
economy of foods, and dietaries. Senior year, second term. Four 
hours. 

Research work in home sanitation, physiology, and chemistry 
of foods, practical dietetics, cooking and other household arts are 
carried on in connection with the Departments of Chemistry, 
Botany, and other Sciences. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 259 

DOMESTIC ART. 
Course I. — Plain Seiving. — The first term's work in Domestic 
Art gives the student a practical knowledge of all varieties of 
stitches in hand sewing. Each pupil makes for herself a set of 
models, including the various stitches, seams, hems, fastenings, 
plackets, gussets, also patching, darning, lace and embroidery 
matching and glove mending. Lectures are given upon the use of 
each model, and a study is made of the various fibers, their growth 
and process of manufacture. Freshman year, First term. Four 
hours. 

Course IV. — Garment Work. — The work in garment making 
is open to young women who have completed the course in Plain 
Sewing. Each student selects materials for underwear, and 
plans, cuts, fits and finishes the underwear for herself under the 
supervision of the instructor. The lecture work is a continuation 
of Course I, and deals with the manufacture of fabrics and the 
evolution of textile machinery. The history of tapestry and rug 
manufacture is taken up, with the making of miniature looms of 
early design by the students, and the manufacture of rugs. Soph- 
omore year, Spring term. Four hours. 

Course VI. — Drafting and Dress-Making. — This Course fiu 
nishes knowledge of the principles of dress-making, with as much 
practice in their application as time permits. The student pui- 
chases, designs, drafts, and makes for herself an unlined cotton 
dress. This course includes also instruction in making hats, the 
principles of trimming; knowledge of materials; lace joining; 
wiring, and preparing materials for trimming; simple hats and 
bows, making of hat frames, covering and trimming the same. 
The lectures of this course consider ciothing from the artistic, hy- 
gienic and philosophic standpoints. The properties and values of 
textile materials are studied and in connection with this the work 
of the Consumers' League and Sweat Shops. Junior year, Second 
term. Four hours. 

Course VII. — Drafting and Dress-Making. — Continuation of 
Course VI. Each young woman designs, drafts and makes for 
herself a lined woolen dress. Instruction is offered in Raffia 
work, Woven and Sewed Basketry. In this course the lectures 
treat of Historic Costume — clothing, the exponent of the age. 
Senior year. First term. Four hours. 

Course IX. — Theory and Practice of Teaching Domestic 
Economy. — This Course considers methods of teaching, the plan- 
ning of Domestic Science and Domestic Art Courses, conducting 



260 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

of classes, management of the laboratory, problems of equipment 
and cost. First term. Six hours. 

Couese X. — Continuation of Course IX. Second term. Four 
hours. 

Couese XI. — History of Art and Home Decoration — Good- 
year's History of Art is used as a text, supplemented by 
lectures and reference work. In Home Decoration the principles 
of construction, ornamentation and color are applied to furnish- 
ings and utensils and to the treatment of walls, floors and 
ceilings. 

The work in these courses is illustrated by photographs of 
architecture, sculpture and painting, and by specimens of textiles, 
wall papers, pottery, fine glass and silver. Senior year, first term. 
Two hours. 

Couese XII. — Continuation of Course XI. Senior year, second 
term. Two hours. 

Wood Carving. — Manual training in wood-work is offered as 
an elective to the young women during the second term of both 
the Junior and Senior years. The purpose of this course is educa- 
tional. The student constructs and decorates articles in wood and 
becomes familiar with the materials 4 and tools of the shop, espec- 
ially those concerned in wood-carving. Junior and Senior year, 
second term. Three hours. 

TWO YEARS' COURSE IN DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

This course aims to meet the demand for teachers thoroughly 
trained in Domestic Science and Domestic Art both on the theo- 
retical and practical sides, and capable of conducting classes and 
organizing courses of study. It affords also excellent training 
for those planning to take charge of food preparation in institu- 
tions. Candidates for admission to the Two Years' Short Course 
must have completed the course of an approved high school or be 
able to meet the Freshmen entrance requirements for the Genral 
and Domestic Science Course. Students completing satisfactorily 
the Two Years' Course receive the Domestic Science Diploma. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY. 

OEANGE HOWAED CESSNA, PBOFESSOE. 

Couese I. — Psychology. — An optional course of elements and 
outlines of Psychology is afforded the first term of the Senior 
year to the students of all the College courses. A standard text is 
used and supplemented by lectures and laboratory work. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE '20 1 

Course II. — Ethics. — An optional course in Ethics is afforded 
the second term of the Senior year to the students of all the col- 
lege courses. Several standard text-books of Ethics are employed 
and supplemented by library work and lectures. All callings 
and pursuits of life are based upon some element of moral obli- 
gation. It is the purpose of this instruction in Ethics to give the 
student a comprehensive acquaintance with the principles and 
the duties of a faithful life and good citizenship. 

Course III. — Educational Psychology. — The aim of this 
Course is to make a study of the elements of psychology and the 
laws of me/ntal development which underlie the educational pro- 
cesses. There will be a study of the adolescent period with a 
view to understanding the psychological laws which direct to 
rational methods of instructiory. 

In the second term the course will also cover at least an 
outline of the history and philosophy of education. 

Lectures, text-book and class exercises with library work. 
Three hours per week throughout the year. The course is for 
the students of the Two Years' Course in Domestic Science. 

DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE AND RHETORIC. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, PROFESSOR. 

MISS LARRABEE, MISS MACLEAN, MISS REED, MISS MILLER 

MISS HOVT, ASSISTANTS. 

In the courses in English two ends are sought, utility and 
culture. Utility predominates im the first years and culture 
in the last, though there is hardly a recitation but contains some- 
thing of both. 

So long as man communicates his thoughts and feelings 
to his fellows, so long will language have a practical value. The 
man who speaks in a bungling manner, only half succeeds in com- 
municating ihis thoughts to others. If they catch his real mean- 
ing they do it by a happy inference of their own as to what he 
meant to say. But no man can afford — certainly no college man 
can afford — to depend on others to correct his own faulty speech. 
If he uses a wrong word, arranges the parts of the sentence im- 
properly, gives some part an undue emphasis, or fails to indicate 
clearly the bearing of one sentence upon another, his language 
does not truly present his thought, and the world may profit 



262 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

little from his attempt to state it. The more valuable his 
thought, the greater his need for a clear and effective use of 
language. 

If the student has mastered grammar and rhetoric, that is 
if he has been trained to apply the principles gone over, his 
speech should be free from errors and inaccuracies of expres- 
sion. More than this: if he has been directed to the study of 
good models, if he has been taught not merely to correct what 
is faulty, but also — and this is far more important — to appre- 
ciate what is excellent in diction, in sentence structure, in the 
development of paragraphs and of whole compostions — if he has 
been made to feel the increased utility, the beauty, and the power 
of language as used by the masters of expression, he will not 
be content to use language that has only the negative merit of 
being without faults, but will press on to attain a style enriched 
by the presence of real excellence, a positive quality. Such 
language is not simply clear and accurate, it is pleasing and pow- 
erful; and the man who has acquired such skill in the use of 
language has greatly increased his influence in the world. If 
he can give his valuable thought an adequate expression, his 
fellows will learn the thought from him, and give him honor 
accordingly; if he cannot, they will learn it from one who can 
state it more clearly or more attractively, and the reward is 
quite as likely to go to the man who best states the thought as 
to the one who first discovers it. 

The courses in grammar, rhetoric, and composition are de- 
voted primarily to this utilitarian end. The facts and principles 
of language are studied, not as valuable in themselves, but as 
useful when applied in spoken or written discourse. To this 
end the student is required to write much, always with some 
definite object to be accomplished, and usually with some good 
model before him to inspire him to more earnest effort. When 
once he has learned to draw from his reading suggestions that 
will be helpful in his future compositions, he has found a pos- 
sible utility in everything he studies as literature and has opened 
the door to continual improvement. Moreover, in learning to 
appreciate what is best in the models set before him, he gains 
insensibly something of culture as well as of utility. 

The course in debating is designed as a training toward 
the effective discussion of live topics. Wherever he goes the col- 
lege graduate is expected to have opinions of his own on the top- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 263 

ics of the day, to be able to state them clearly and forcibly, and, 
if need be, to defend them. To this end he should train himself 
to close analysis of complex problems, to a severe testing of 
every conclusion, his own as well as other people's. Moreover, 
the public will not wait for him to retire to his study for labored 
preparation. They expect him to be ready when the occasion 
calls, and they have generous rewards for the man who is ready 
— ready to map out a clear-cut line of argument, ready to support 
it with proofs, and able to present it clearly and forcibly in off- 
hand discussion. Such readiness comes only from long-continued 
right-thinking and clear-speaking. It is the aim of this course 
to start the student toward this goal. 

In the courses in literature it is probably true that the cul- 
ture side predominates, yet utility is seldom lacking. The study 
of literature calls for close observation, correct inference, fine 
discrimination. When the mind is trained to do such work, it 
acquires a power that abides, a power that can be applied to any 
task. Literature deals with the whole range of human exper- 
ience, emotion, activity. In studying literature, therefore, we 
are required to give some study to the mind and heart of man. 
If such study does not exert an elevating influence, it can only 
be because the reader does not choose the best, or does not ap- 
proach the work in the right spirit. At the very least, it ought 
to give him a deeper insight into human nature, and that is no 
small gain. But literature is also an art, an art that engages 
the attention of more people, and holds that attention for a long- 
er time, than does any other art. In studying it, therefore, we 
are cultivating the aesthetic sense, a part of our nature not ap- 
pealed to by most studies. Best of all, perhaps, it brings us into 
the company of the rarest minds of all times; it gives command 
of the best thought of the best minds; it brings to us the "bles- 
sed companionship of wise thoughts and right feelings." It 
broadens the mind, quickens the imagination, enlarges the sym- 
pathies, enriches the whole nature. 

COURSES IN ENGLISH. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

Course I. — Grammar. — Syntax of good modern prose; copi- 
ous analysis, with emphasis on phrases and clauses as structural 
units of the sentence, and careful study as to their proper posi- 
tion and connection; daily drill in sentence construction, the ap- 



264 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

plication of what the student has learned from sentence analysis; 
study of the principles of punctuation, with drill in applying 
them; correction of errors in grammar. Study of language di- 
rect, with as little use of text-book as circumstances will permit. 
Designed to give that ready command of the sentence that shall 
leave the student free to seek excellence of structure without 
needing to give conscious thought to correctness. For admission 
to this course students must pass an examination on the eight 
parts of speech, their subdivisions, inflections, and properties, or 
else present a teacher's certificate or a satisfactory grade in a 
good high school. All courses. Belongs properly to the fall 
term, but is given in the spring term also. Five hours. 

Couese I. (a) — Grammar Review. — A review course in Eng- 
lish I, designed for students who show, by examination or by 
making elementary mistakes in essays written for English II 
or English III, that they need further drill in grammar. Stu- 
dents assigned to English I may be promoted to this course pro- 
vided their work for the first two weeks is sufficiently good. All 
courses. Both terms. Two hours. 

Course II. — Elementary Rhetoric and Composition. — Devoted 
largely to the study of the paragraph, with Scott and Denney's 
"Composition-Rhetoric" as text-book. Careful analysis of good 
models, followed by compositions designed to apply the methods 
just analyzed. An essay once a week, with exercises almost 
daily; each student to correct the mistakes he has made. Pre- 
requisite, English I, taken in class or by examination, or diploma 
from a partly accredited high school. If a student's essays show 
need of further drill in grammar or punctuation, he will be 
required to make up the deficiency. Belongs properly in the 
spring term, but is given in the fall term also. Five hours. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Course III. — Advanced Rhetoric and Composition. — Devoted 
mainly to the principles involved in the different forms of dis- 
course. Lectures and outlines, with daily exercises and an essay 
once a week. Reference to leading text-books. Analysis of good 
prose models. Prerequisite, English II, taken in class or by ex- 
amination, or the passing of the entrance tests at the beginning 
of the term. If a student's essays are unsatisfactory, he will 
be required to make up the deficiency, no matter what credits he 
may have. Belongs properly in the fall term, but is given in 



division of sen \< i: 266 

the spring term also. Required in all the four-year courses. 
Five hours. 

Course IX. — Composition. — A special course in narration 
and description, to be taken at the same time as English III. 
For students in the course in Agronomy only. Fall term only. 
One hour. 

Course IV. — Composition. — Weekly themes in narration and 
description, based on models read and discussed before the class. 
Prerequisite, English III. Required in the Science and Engin- 
eering courses. Spring term only. One hour. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Course V. — Composition. — Weekly themes in exposition. 
Prerequisite, the preceding courses in English. Required in all 
the four-year courses. Fall term only. One hour. 

Course IV. — Composition. — Weekly themes in narration and 
description, based on models read and discussed before the class. 
Prerequisite, English III. Required in the courses in Animal 
Husbandry, Dairying, and Horticulture. Spring term only. One 
hour. 

Course VI. — Composition. — Weekly themes and briefs in ar- 
gumentation. Prerequisite, the preceding courses in English. 
Required in all the four-year courses. Spring term only. One hour. 

The aim of the courses in composition is to train the stu- 
dent to express his thought on whatever subject, not only with 
clearness and ease but with some measure of grace, attractive- 
ness, and power. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Courses VII and VIII. — Debating. — A course in stating and 
defining questions for debate, in making briefs, and in extempor- 
aneous debating; the application of argumentative principles and 
methods to live topics. Elective in all courses for students 
who have completed the preceding courses in English. Course 
VII in the fall term, Course VIII in the spring term. One hour 

each. 

COURSES IN LITERATURE. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Course I. — The Drama. — Devoted mainly to a study of Shake- 
speare, with a rapid survey, largely by reports and informal lec- 
tures, of the drama before his time, and a rapid reading of one 



266 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

or two dramas of subsequent time. In Shakespeare a few plays 
will be studied carefully and others read rapidly. Character 
analysis and interpretation, with grouping and contrast. Plot 
analysis, with stages of complication and resolution. Prerequis- 
ites, the courses in English for the Freshman and Sophomore 
years. Required in the course in General and Domestic Science. 
Elective in the courses in Agriculture and the course in Sciences 
related to the Industries. Fall term. Three hours. 

Course II. — Epic and Lyric Poetry. — A course in English 
poetry, excluding the drama. Selections £rom Milton, Pope, 
Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, and Browning. 
Classification of the various forms of poetry. Study of rhythm, 
meter, rhyme, alliteration, figures of speech, melody, harmony, 
etc. Principles of criticism applicable to the poems studied. 
Prerequisites, the courses in English for the Freshman and Soph- 
omore years, and History II; Literature I, though not strictly 
necessary, will yet be of great help. Required in the course 
in General and Domestic Science; elective in the courses in 
Agriculture and the course in Sciences related to the Industries. 
Spring term. Five hours. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Course III. — Fiction. — A course in the novel, the romance, 
and the short story. Plot and character analysis. Disputed 
points regarding the novel. Outline for systematic study. Com- 
parison with the drama. Prerequisites, Literature I, and the 
courses in English. Elective in the courses in Agriculture and 
the two Science courses. Fall term. Three hours. 

Course IV. — American Literature. — A study of our best poets 
and prose writers. Comparison with English authors and works. 
Interrelations of our literature and history. A glance at the 
prominent writers of the present day. Prerequisites, Literature 
II and the courses in English. Elective as before. Spring term. 
Three hours. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 267 

DEPARTMENT OF ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 
PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR WOMEN. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, PROFESSOR. 
SADIE HOOK, INSTRUCTOR IN ELOCUTION AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

IN GENERAL. 

The relation of the department work to the college course is 
the same as that of any other study. In some courses it is elec- 
tive, in some years it is required and the credits are given on 
a basis with every other required or elective study. We aim to 
equip men and women to speak well, to tell what they know and 
give their opinions, read and recite in a pleasing and effective 
manner. All will be called upon at some time to speak publicly, 
all talk every day, more or less, and for both the more formid- 
able speech and for conversation the work of the department is 
planned. The subjects which make for perfection along these 
lines are briefly: emphasis, enunciation, articulation, time, ener- 
gy, inflection, appreciation, voice culture, physical control, ges- 
ture, etc, etc. 

ELOCUTION. 

Elocution has been and still is considered often as a special, 
peculiar, and extraordinary art. There is no denying that it is 
an art, but first of all it is common sense; common sense applied 
to speech. The principles which govern conversation to make 
it dignified, pleasing and forceful may be called Elocution. The 
mastery of them would make the speaker artistic. These princi- 
ples are not different when applied to public speech. Public 
speech is therefore conversation on an enlarged scale. 

To reduce Elocution to a system is neither possible, nor desir- 
able. No one system can be made applicable to all persons, as 
no one style of clothing is appropriate to all classes and con- 
ditions of men. There are as many styles of elocution or sys- 
tems of expression as there are people. Each one possesses an 
elocution of his own and that should not be taken from him 
and an inferior one for him be substituted. The development of 
that power and manner which one possesses already is our aim 
in the courses of study outlined below. 



268 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

We grant that all so-called systems have good suggestions. 
We attempt to use the best of any and all methods, but the stu- 
dent himself is the system and he and his possibility should be 
respected. The elimination of faults in speech which mar his 
efforts and the correction of mannerisms that hinder his success 
are subject to adverse criticism. To stand and think and talk 
well at one and the same time should be the ambition of every 
student and man and woman in his chosen occupation. 

The theory and practice of Expression, — and speech is more 
practice than theory, — covers five years of work to those who 
begin in the academic year, four years to those who begin fresh- 
man. However, not all the college courses grant electives in 
this course with credit, though none are excluded if the proper 
consent is given. We begin with the first and fundamental work, 
i. e., How to Read. The interpretation of thought and senti- 
ment is the first desideratum, after that the attention is turned 
toward physical expression, then on into more formidable 
recitation and declamation, oratory and extempore speaking. 

ORATORY. 

Not the least in point of importance in the course of study 
is that of special attention to the building of an oratorical ad- 
dress or speech. Course VIII has to do with how to write an ora- 
tion. In that course great orations are studied and analyzed. 
Their language and plans are observed and a critical and careful 
scrutiny is given to detail. Winning orations in state and inter- 
state contests are closely observed and the principles which seem 
to have made them win are emulated. The student writes an 
oration on a selected subject and delivers it as a part of his 
work and under the direction of the head of the department. 
In certain courses still another oration is required in the Senior 
year. 

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION AND LESSONS. 

A very limited number of students are admitted under the 
rules of the college for the purpose of making a professional 
study of Elocution and Oratory. Students in this advance work 
are advised to finish a college course as a foundation, choose the 
particular line of work, either teaching the subject or entertain- 
ing publicly, and direct their efforts and study to that end. Spe- 
cial tuition is charged for such work. Apply to head of depart- 
ment direct for further information. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 269 

COURSES OF STUDY IN ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 

Course I. — Required in first term Academic. All courses. 
Two hours per week. 

Lectures on Emphasis, Purpose and kindred subjects. 
Thought getting and giving, reading and reciting and analysis 
of selections from literary masterpieces constitute the work of 
this term. 

Course II. — Required in second term Academic Agricultural 
course, and in second term Freshman, all courses except Engin- 
eering and Veterinary. Open to students who have completed 
Course I or those approved by head of department. One hour per 
week. 

Lectures on physical and vocal expression, gesture and sup- 
plementary topics. More formidable recitation and declamation; 
criticism and coaching the student on the floor. 

Course III. — Elective in Junior and Senior years. Open to 
students who have completed Course II. First term Junior, all 
courses except Engineering and Veterinary. Two hours per 
week. 

Lectures on Imagination and Literary Interpretation; practi- 
cal exercises on the floor; papers on assigned topics; Recitation 
and Declamation; Dramatic Interpretation. 

Course IV. — Elective in Junior and Senior years. Open to 
students who have completed Courses II and III. Second term 
Junior. All courses except Engineering and Veterinary. Two 
hours per week. 

Lectures on Dramatic Interpretation; Character Imperson- 
ation; Oratory and Professional Elocutionary work. Practical 
work on the platform. 

Course V. — Elective in Senior year. Open to students who 
have completed Courses II and III. First term Senior, all courses 
except Engineering and Veterinary. Two hours per week. 

Further Dramatic work. Clipping selections from stories 
and novels. Lectures on Oratory and Orators, Acting and Act- 
ors. Scenes and plays studied and acted. Monologues present- 
ed. 

Course VI.— Elective in Senior year. Open to students hav- 
ing completed a satisfactory amount of previous work. Second 
term Senior. Two hours per week. 



270 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Lectures on Extempore Speaking and practical work in it. 
Advanced dramatic work and general review. 

Course VII. — Required in General and Domestic Science 
Course for women, Sophomore year. Two hours per week. 

Lectures and practical work in aesthetic culture and ex- 
pression. 

Course VIII. — Public Speaking. Required in Second term 
Junior, all courses except Engineering, Agriculture and Veter- 
inary; elective in Agriculture. One hour per week. 

Lectures on Orations and how to prepare and write them. 
The study of speeches and master addresses. The writing and 
delivery of one production by each student. 

Course IX. — Required for First term Senior, all courses 
except Engineering, Veterinary and Agriculture; elective in Ag- 
riculture. 

One oration written and delivered under the direction of 
the head of the department. 

Besides these specified courses of instruction in class, num- 
erous special lessons and drill are given in the nature of coach- 
ing. Special selections are assigned based on the needs of the 
student as seen in his class room work and his defects and 
strengths are given especial attention. Literary society declam- 
atory and oratorical contest work is cared for by the teaching 
force of the department, such drill and preparation as each may 
need for his appearance in the contest are provided gratis. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR WOMEN. 

SADIE HOOK, INSTRUCTOR. 

Training in Physical Culture is required of the young wom- 
en in the Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years. The work be- 
gins the middle of October and ends the first of April. Two 
forty-five minute periods each week are required. Aside from 
the class-work, individual daily practice is insisted upon. 

No one system of exercises, but a combination of the best 
suggestions from several systems, principally those of Anderson, 
Posse, Emerson, Swoboda and McFadden, are used. The aim 
throughout is perfect health, which is brought about by the 
higher physical development. Perfect poise and proper carriage 
of the body are urged at all times. Attention is called to the 
effect of this higher development upon the character of the in- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 271 

dividual; e. g. A well poised erect body is usually indicative of 
a high moral character. 

Indian clubs, dumb bells, suspended bars, rings and exer- 
cisers are used, but perhaps more attention is given to free hand 
muscular exercises without the use of apparatus, as such work 
brings about a certain muscular control and force which soon be- 
comes a part of the individual. One term's work is devoted to 
correct breathing and breath control. The advanced work is 
along the line of aesthetics. A few minutes each period 
throughout the entire work, is given to brisk walking and run- 
ning steps. 

Perfect freedom of the body, unhampered in any way, is 
always required. 

Basket ball and tennis are the out door sports in which the 
young ladies take an active part. 

Course I consits of vigorous exercise with dumb bells, to- 
gether with many walking and running steps. The bells are dis- 
carded the last half of the term and the rigid muscle is used 
instead. 

Course II. — This is a course in breathing and breath con- 
trol. The mind must become the master of the body. The 
physiological importance of proper breathing and carriage of the 
body is emphasized. 

Course III. — A few minutes each period are given to the> 
work in Courses I and II. Indian club swinging is the principal 
work of this term. 

Course IV consists of specific exercises for the different 
parts of the body. These exercises are varied to suit the needs 
of each individual. Work in the previous course is also given 
attention. 

Courses V and VI. — The third year's work is purely aes- 
thetic, for development along the lines of ease and grace of move- 
ment. The student is urged to keep up the practice upon the 
work in the first four courses but the class work consists of fancy 
steps, drills and free easy movements. 



272 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

LIZZIE MAY ALUS, PROFESSOR. 
GRACE I. NORTON, INSTRUCTOR. 

The College now offers a two and one-half years' Course in 
German and two years' Course in French. 

♦Students take French or German in the Freshman year 
of all the Engineering Courses. 

In the Academic year of the Course in Science, German is 
taken, provided the English grammar of the Academic year has 
been completed. 

In the Freshman year of the Course in Science, second year 
German or first year French is optional. 

In the Sophomore year of the same course, for the first term, 
third year German or second year French is optional. 

In the Course for women, in the Academic year, German 
is taken, if English grammar of the Academic year has been com- 
pleted. 

German or French is optional in the first two years of the 
Course for Women. 

German and French are electives in the Junior and Senior 
years of the same course. 

FRENCH. 

Course I. — First Term. — Fraser and Squair's French Gram- 
mar is used as text-book for grammatical work, supplemented by 
conversation and dictation exercises. 

Course II. — Second Term. — Translation and study of "Le 
Tour de la France," Bruno; "L'Abbe Constantin," Halevy. 

Course III. — Third Term. — "Colomba," Merimee; "Un Phil- 
osophe Sous Les Toits," Souvestre. 

Course IV. — Fourth Term. — "Les Forceurs de Blocus," Jules 
Verne; Monte-Cristo, Dumas; A Scientific French Reader, Herd- 
ler. 

Course X. — Academic Year. First Term. Engineering Stu- 
dents. Fraser and Squair's "French Grammar" is used as text- 



*Beginning with the fall term, 1903, French or German will be required of 
engineering students in the Academic year. 

Beginning with the fall term, 1904, Freshman French or German for engi- 
neering students will be second year work. 

Beginning with the fall term 1903 French or German will be required of 
Agricultural students in the Freshman year. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 273 

book for the grammatical work, supplemented by conversation 
and dictation exercises. Three times per week. 

Course XL — Academic Year. Second Term. Engineering Stu- 
dents. Translation and study of "Le Tour de la France," Bruno; 
"L'Abbe' Constantin," Halevy. Three times per week. 

GERMAN. 

Course V. — First Term. — Spanhoofd's "Lehrbuch der 
Deutsciien Sprache," including grammar, composition, reading 
and conversation. 

Course VI. — Second Term. — "Lehrbuch der Deutschen 
Sprache,'" with continued drill in the principles of declension, 
conjugation and syntax. Storm's "Immensee." 

Course VII. — Third Term. — "Hoher als die Kirche," Hillern; 
"Ein Besuch bei Charles Dickens," Hans Christian Andersen. 
"Der Zerbrochene Krug," Zochokke. 

Courses VIII and IX. — Fourth and Fifth Terms. — "German 
Science Reader," Gore; Works of Goethe and Schiller, con- 
versation and study of syntax being continued throughout the 
course. 

Course XII. — Academic Year. — First Term. — Engineering 
Students. Spanhoofd's "Lehrbuch der Deutschen Sprache," in- 
cluding grammar, composition, reading and conversation. Three 
times per week. 

Course XIII. — Academic Year. — Second Term. — Engineering 
Students. "Lehrbuch der Deutschen Sprache," with continued 
drill in the principles of declension, conjugation and syntax. 
Storm's "Immensee." Three times per week. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, PROFESSOR. 
MR. C. M. PERRIN AND MISS MAE MILLER, INSTRUCTORS. 

Increasing emphasis is rightly placed on the value of the 
study of history both from the standpoint of general culture and 
usefulness. The men and women who take up the duties of cit- 
izenship in this day should have the broadest outlook and come 
to their tasks with a sympathetic appreciation of what the world 
has already achieved. No study can have a more practical bear- 
ing upon the preparation of the citizen than the evolution of 
human institutions. 

18 



274 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

The present day utilitarian view of life may sacrifice the 
man and the citizen in the interest of the specialist, yet in real- 
ity he is the most successful in his specialty, other things being 
equal, who comes to it with the broadest general preparation. 

In view of these facts, the Courses in History aim to give, 
as far as possible in the limited time alloted, a good general 
view of the evolution of social, economical and political insti- 
tutions and the main elements of civilization in general, and to 
fit the student for intelligently assuming the duties of citizenship. 

The student has at his command the large College Library, 
which contains, besides the principal works of reference, an 
important section devoted to historical subjects. Quite an addi- 
tion to the library has been recently made of the new books 
covering the later phases of historical development. 

The text-book in each case is equivalent to about one-half the 
required work. The remainder is covered by the lectures and 
library and thesis preparation. 

COURSES IN HISTORY. 

Course I. — Ancient History. — A general survey of the his- 
tory of the world to the division of Charlemagne's Empire. Spec- 
ial emphasis is given to the history of Greece and Rome and the 
events of the earlier Middle Ages. A text-book is used which is 
supplemented with papers and library work. Five hours per 
week, first semester of the Academic year of the Science, General 
and Domestic Science and Agricultural Courses. 

Course II. — European History. — A continuation of Course I 
and treats of the historic movements to the present time. Begin- 
ning with the history of the later Middle Ages the aim is to trace 
the origin and development of the modern states of Europe. The 
purpose of Courses I and II is to give the student a general view 
of the principal events in the world's history. The text-book is 
supplemented by written and library work. Four hours per week, 
second semester of the Academic year of the Science, General and 
Domestic Science and Agricultural Courses. 

Course III. — Historic Development of the United States. — 
This course is based upon a brief survey of the Colonial period 
and gives special attention to the constitutional era, the signifi- 
cance of the territorial expansion and democratic movements 
during the times of Jefferson and Jackson and the causes leading 
to the Civil War. Text-book, lectures and library work. Three 






division OF sci i:\ik 275 

hours per week. Elective, first semester of the Senior year of 
the Science, General and Domestic Science and Agricultural 
Courses. 

Course IV. — History of Civilization. — The aim of this course 
is to give at least an outline of the permanent elements of human 
progress with some reference to the evolution of modern civiliz- 
ation. Text-book, lectures and thesis work. Three hours per 
week, elective in the second semester of the Senior year, of the 
Science, General and Domestic Science and Agricultural Courses. 

Course V. — Mediaeval Institutions. — This course treats of 
the great institutions and historic movements of the Middle 
Ages. Beginning with a review of the main features of the 
Greek and Roman civilizations there is a brief treatment of the 
earlier Middle Ages. This is followed by a more careful study of 
Feudalism, the growth of cities and commerce and the Renais- 
sance Age together with the origin and early growth of the 
modern states of Europe. The text is supplemented by lectures, 
papers and library work. Three hours per week, elective in the 
first semester of the Junior year of the Science, and Agricultural 
Courses. Required together with Course X in either the Junior 
or Senior year of the Course in General and Domestic Science. 

Course VI. — Europe in the 16th, 11th and 18th Centuries. — 
This course aims to give a careful study to historic development 
during these important centuries. The principal topics treated 
are: The Reformation, the struggle for constitutional liberty in 
England, the ascendency of France, the rise of Prussia and Rus- 
sia and England's colonial supremacy. Attention is given to the 
social, economic and literary features as well as the political 
movements of the period. "Lectures and library work. Three 
hours per week, elective second semester of the Scince and Agri- 
cultural Courses. Required together with Course XI in either 
the Junior or Senior year of the course in General and Domestic 
Science. 

Course VII.— The XlXth Century (First Half.).— The aim of 
this Course is to study the causes and significance of 
the French Revolution; the reactionary movements under Met- 
ternich and the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848. Lectures with 
library work. Two hours per week, elective, and may be taken 
in either the Junior or Senior year of the Engineering Courses. 

Course VIII.— The XlXth Century. (Last Half.).— Beginning 
with a brief review of the French Revolution and the events of 



276 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the early part of the century this course traces the causes and 
results of the Reconstruction of Europe during the last half of 
the century. Special attention is given to German and Italian 
unity; the French Empire and Republic; the Victorian Era in 
English history and the Eastern Question. Lectures, papers and 
library work. Elective, two hours per week and may be taken 
in the second semester of either the Junior or Senior year of the 
Engineering Courses. 

Course IX. — The Far Eastern Question. — This course covers 
the questions growing out of the later developments in the Far 
East. It is a study of world movements at the beginning of the 
new century. It is based on Reinch's "World Politics at the Close 
of the XlXth Century." Lectures and library work. Two hours 
per week, Elective second semester, Senior year of the Courses in 
Science, General and Domstic Science and Agriculture. 

Course X. — The French Revolution and the Reactionary 
movements. — This course covers the following topics: The re- 
mote and immediate causes of the Revolution; the era of internal 
upheaval; the Napoleonic Wars; the reaction under Metternich; 
and the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848. Attention will be given to 
the institutional changes touching the political, social, and econ- 
omic aspects of the movements. Lectures and library work. Two 
hours per week, elective in the first semester of the Junior year 
of the Science, Agricultural, and the General and Domestic Sci- 
ence Courses. 

Course XL — Europe Since 1850. — This course is a continua- 
tion of Course X and is a study of the causes and results of the 
Reconstruction of Europe during the last half of the XlXth 
Century. Special attention is given to German and Italian unity; 
the French Empire and Republic; the Eastern Question, and 
later movements in English history. Lectures and library work. 
Two hours per week, elective, second semester, Junior year of the 
Science, Agricultural, and the General and Domestic Science 
Courses. 

Course XII. — This course is a study of some of the questions 
relating to the political, constitutional and social movements 
growing out of the Civil War and the Reconstruction Period. 
Lectures with library work. Two hours per week. Elective, first 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 9 



i < 



semester of the Science, General and Domestic Science and Agri- 
cultural Courses. 

Course XV.— Ancient and Mediaeval History.— A general 
survey of the history of the world to the Reformation. Special 
attention is given to the history of Greece and Rome and the 
historic movements during the Middle Ages. The text-book is 
supplemented by library and written work. Four hours per 
week, first semester of the Academic year of the Engineering 
Courses. 

Course XVI.— Modern History.— This course is a continua- 
tion of Course XV and gives in outline the principal historic 
movements from the Reformation to the present. Courses XV 
and XVI give a general survey of the history of the world. The 
text will be supplemented by lectures and library work. Two 
hours per week, second semester, Academic year of the Engin- 
eering Courses. 

Course XVII. — Formative Periods in European History. — 
This course is a study of the principal movements of European 
history. The aim is to emphasize and unify the principal forces 
and movements in the evolution of modern democratic institu- 
tions. Lectures with written and library work. One hour per 
week first semester of the Freshman year of the Engineering and 
Agricultural Courses. 

Course XVIII. — The American Nation. — This course is a 
survey of the most important steps in the formation of the Amer- 
ican Nation. It is a study of the political, intellectual, social and 
industrial forces which have made the Republic. Lectures with 
library and written work. One hour per week, second semester 
of the Freshman year of the Engineering Courses. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, PROFESSOR. 

It is not intended to complete the education of the thorough 
soldier, but to fit young men for filling intelligently, positions in 
the State troops as line officers and company instructors. The 
constant demand for men thus trained emphasizes the value of a 
thoroughly organized and well sustained military course. The 
chief advantages derived are the acquirement of a dignified 
carriage of the person, a gentlemanly deportment and a self- 
respecting discipline, with habits of neatness, order and punc- 
tuality. Opportunities are afforded each cadet for extending the 



278 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

studies in military science, as desired, the College being provided 
with the necessary arms, accoutrements and outfits for drill and 
instructions in the infantry, artillery, and signal tactics, for 
which special classes will be formed. Lectures on military sub- 
jects are delivered throughout the course, and regular battalion 
drill and parade take place each Monday and Wednesday after- 
noons. All male students of the College, except such as may be 
excused on account of physical disability by proper authority, are 
required to become members of the College battalion, and wear 
the prescribed uniform during military exercises. Students in 
the Academic year are not required to drill. 

Course I. — First Term, Freshman Year. — Two drills each 
week. 

Course II. — Second Term, Freshman Year. — Two drills each 
week. 

Course III. — First Term, Sophomore Year. — Two drills each 
week and Non-Commissioned Officers' School of one hour each 
week; School of the Guides and Guard Duty. 

Course IV. — Second Term, Sophomore Year. — Two drills each 
week, and Non-Commissioned Officers' School of one hour each 
week; Drill Regulations and Guard Duty. 

Course V. — First Term, Junior Year, and 

Course VI. — Second Term, Junior Year. — Two drills each 
week, and Officers' School of one hour each week; Drill Regula- 
tions. Guard Duty and Army Regulations. Elective in all courses. 

Course VII. — First Term, Senior Year, and 

Course VIII. — Second Term, Senior Year. — Two drills each 
week and Officers' School of one hour each week; Service of Secur- 
ity and Information; Military Engineering; Military Law, and 
Military Hygiene. Elective in all courses. 

THE LIBRARY. 

VINA ELETHE CLARK, LIBRARIAN. 
MISS STEVENS, ASSISTANT. 

The College Library numbers about 16,000 volumes, these 
being standard works of history, biography, engineering, agricul- 
ture, natural science, mental and moral philosophy, poetry, gen- 
eral literature and reference. It has been arranged with a view 
to making it especially valuable as a reference library. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 279 

The books are selected by specialists, the heads of depart- 
ments indicating such works as they wish the library to have 
bearing upon their respective lines of study. 

The library is classified according to the Dewey Decimal 
System of Classification and the card catalog is in two parts, the 
Dictionary (author and title) and Classed. 

The library receives about 225 periodical publications, liter- 
ary, scientific and general, and there are complete files of many 
of these upon the shelves. 

The library has on file 4,000 unbound pamphlets, and is in 
constant receipt of large numbers of pamphlet publications from 
the various departments of the government, agricultural experi- 
ment stations and other sources. The library has also several 
hundred bound volumes of government publications, such as 
Geological Surveys, United States Experiment Station Bulletins, 
Congressional Record, War of Rebellion Record, Census Reports, 
Cabinet Officers' Reports, etc. 

The reading room of the library is a large, well-lighted room, 
and is open to readers ten hours daily, except Sundays, when it is 
open five hours. Current numbers of periodicals are kept in the 
reading room and are accessible to all, as are newspapers, College 
exchanges, dictionaries, encyclopaedias, Poole's Index, the card 
catalogue, etc. 

The library subscribes for several Chicago and Iowa dailies, 
and, through the courtesy of the editors, a large number of the 
daily and county newspapers of Iowa are sent to the reading 
room for the use of students. 

Personal assistance and suggestions upon all matters relat- 
ing to the library will be given by the librarian and assistant to 
all who desire such help. 

All students in the Freshman Year in all courses are required 
to take Library work to the extent of four hours in the fall term. 

Course I. — Library Work. — Pour hours in the First term, 
Freshman Year. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 

FRANK J. RESLER, DIRECTOR. 

The general plan of instruction is similar to that of the best 
conservatories, and aims to cultivate in the pupil an intelligent 
appreciation of the noble and beautiful in music. It is designed 
to lay a sound foundation upon which to build rather than to im- 



280 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

part a superficial knowledge for the purpose of display. The 
branches taught are Piano, Pipe Organ, History of Music, Voice 
Culture and Sight Singing. 

PIANO — COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

Grade 1. — Rudiments of Music, Touch and Technique, Prepara- 
tory Exercises by Kohler, Czerny, Duvernoy, etc. 

Grade 2. — Touch and Technique. Exercises by Concone, Loes- 
chorn, Czerny, Heller, etc. Octave studies and easy 
pieces by good composers. 

Grade 3. — Touch and Technique. Sonatas by Haydn and Mozart. 
Selections from Schubert, Heller, etc.; studies by 
Plaidy, Czerny, etc. 

Grade 4- — Sixty selected studies by Cramer-Buelow, Beethoven's 
Sonatas. Selected works from Mendelssohn, Weber, 
Chopin, Rubinstein, Liszt, etc. Daily studies by Tausig. 

VOICE CULTURE. 

The method of vocal study aims, by graduated exercises and 
pieces carefully selected, to develop quality of tone, flexibility, 
power and compass of voice along with correct style and expres- 
sion in all kinds of songs. 

The method aims at ease of production of tones, cultivation 
of the proper sensation of each tone, correct phrasing, and withal, 
clean enunciation. Throaty, breathy, palatal and nasal tones are 
eradicated. 

All advanced pupils are admitted free to a large chorus choir, 
under the leadership of the Director of Music. Only the best 
works from the great composers are used, and it is believed that 
the proper rendering of such music is of no little benefit to the 
musical culture of the earnest student. 

The chorus furnishes the music at the Sabbath service and 
assists in the concerts and public recitals of the department. 

Public concerts and recitals are given at frequent intervals 
during the year; also private recitals weekly, in which all music 
pupils will be expected to take part. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 281 

Students may enter at any time All tuition and piano rent 
is payable in advance to the director. 

Students may enroll for music alone without additional 
expense. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition for half-hour lessons in each branch: 

For term of twenty lessons $15 . 00 

For term of thirty lessons 21 . 50 

For term of forty lessons 28.00 

The Department of Music is prepared to furnish practice 
rooms with piano, light and heat for the following rate: One 
hour daily for the entire school term, $3.00. 

For additional hours the rate per hour will be a little less. 
All music will be furnished at a discount. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



284 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SENIOR HONOR STUDENTS, 1903. 

Each of the following has the highest standing in the course 
represented : 

A. C. Lasher, Course in Electrical Engineering. 

John Brhel, Course in Mechanical Engineering. 

Ethelyn Younie, Course in General and Domestic Science. 

Richard Hopkins, Course in Civil Engineering. 

A. E. Elder, Course in Science. 

M. Rosenberger, Course in Veterinary Science. 

J. C. Cleghorn, Course in Mining Engineering. 

C. W. Norton, Course in Agriculture. 

The remaining two are those having the highest average 
standing of all the candidates for degrees from all the courses, 
excepting those that represent some particular course. 

O. B. Moorehouse, Course in Mechanical Engineering. 

Porter Eveland, Course in Electrical Engineering. 

HONORS IN THE LITERARY CONTESTS. 
DECLAMATORY CONTEST, SPRING TERM, 1902. 

Dramatic — R. E. Blackwood, Phileleutheroi. 
Oratorical — Prize divided between Dwight Davis, Welch, and 
S. H. Smith, Pythian. 

ORATORICAL CONTEST, FALL TERM, 1902. 

First Prize — Mae Bower, Cliolian. 
Second Prize — Edna King, Phileleutheroi. 
Third Prize — Ira W. Jones, Bachelor. 

INTER-SOCIETY DEBATES, SPRIN GTERM, 1902. 

Question: "Resolved, that public ownership of natural mon- 
opolies such as street railways, waterworks, and lighting plants, 
is preferable to private ownership." 

Bachelor vs. Welsh — I. W. Jones, H. 0. Tellier. 

Crescent vs. Welsh — J. C. Austin, T. R. Agg. 

Crescent vs. Bachelor — H. S. Pillsbury, W. W. Hendrix. 

Phileleutheroi vs. Philomathean — A. T. Jenkins, T. W. Dodd. 

Phileleutheroi vs. Pythian — H. N. Ebersole, R. E. Blackwood. 

Pythian vs. Philomathean — Oscar Royce, E. S. Guthrie. 

(Winning society placed first). 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



285 



INTER-SOCIETY DEBATES, PALL TERM, 1902. 

Question: "Resolved, that the present tendency toward con- 
centration in the ownership and management of railroads is con- 
ducive to the public welfare." 

Welsh vs. Philomathean — Wayne Dinsmore, A. L. Sanford. 

Pythian vs. Welch — F. M. Hanson, J. O. Shaff. 

Philomathean vs. Pythian — Paul H. Brown, G. M. Lummis. 

Crescent vs. Bachelor — T. S. Hunt, Homer Read. 

Phileleutheroi vs. Crescent — H. K. Dodge, M. L. Merritt. 

Phileleutheroi vs. Bachelor — R. E. Blackwood, H. N. Eberosel. 

INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATES, 1902. 

The following students represented the College in the debate 
with Iowa State Normal School: 

W. W. Hendrix, Crescent Literary Society. 

Ira W. Jones, Bachelor Debating Society. 

T. W. Dodd, Phileleutheroi Literary Society. 

H. N. Ebersole (alternate), Phileleutheroi Literary Society 

POST-GRADUATES. 



NAME. 




TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Edgett, Ora, B. Sc, 




Ames, 


Story. 


Ellis, C. E., B. S. A., 




Ames, 


Story. 


Frandson, J. H., B. S 


. A., 


Story City, 


Story. 


McKinney, R. C, B. Sc. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Myers, E. C, B. S. A. 


> 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Watkins, H. R., B. A. 


> 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 




SENIORS. 




NAME. 


COURSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Allison, Frank E., 


Ag., 


Lohrville, 


Calhoun. 


Angier, G. H., 


Ag., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista 


Barton, Elva, G. 


& P. S., 


Lu Verne, 


Kossuth. 


Battey, W. R., 


M. E. 


Dexter, 


Dallas. 


Bissell, P. R., 


M. E., 


Mt. Vernon, 


Hew York. 


Blair, R A., 


C. E., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Bower, Mae, G. 


& D. S., 


West Union, 


Fayette. 


Brhel, John, 


M. E., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Brown, J. F., 


C. E., 


Shelby, 


Shelby. 


Brown, Josephine, G. 


& D. S., 


Shelby, 


Shelby. 


Brown, Paul H., 


Ag., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Buchanan, C. C, 


E. E., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Buck, Leon, G. 


& D. S„ 


Moulton, 


Appanoose. 


Butts, D. J., 


E. E., 


Van Wert, 


Decatur. 


Byl, F. M., 


M. E., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 



286 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Chattin, A. B., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Christie, G. I., 


Ag., 


Winchester, 


Ontario,, Can. 


Cleghorn, John C, 


Min.\Eng., 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


Crocker, T. T., 


E. E., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Cummins, W. M., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dimmitt, H. G., 


M. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Dodd, T. W., 


C. E., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Dodge, H K., 


C. E., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Donovan, D. E., 


C. E., 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Ebersole, H. N., 


M. E., 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Elder, A. E., 


Sc., 


Allerton, 


Wayne. 


Eveland, Porter, 


E E., 


Garden Grove, 


Decatur. 


Fitch, T. T., 


C. E., 


Lytton, 


Sac. 


Pogel, Estella, 


Sc, 


Burlington, 


Des Moines. 


Gearhart, G. S., 


M. E., 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Goss, H. D., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Grant, Nellie, 


G. & D. S., 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Hanson, Lillian, 


G. & D. S., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Hendrix, W. W., 


C. E., 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Hobein, C. A., 


E. E., 


Estherville, 


Emmet. 


Hopkins, Richard, 


C. E., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Houck, E. C, 


E. E., 


Bedford, 


Taylor. 


Howard, E. R. T., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hunt, Thos. S., 


Ag., 


Ackley, 


Hardin. 


Hyde, E. A., 


Ag., 


Washington, 


D. C. 


Jones, Ira W., 


Sc, 


Allison, 


Butler. 


Jones, John S., 


Ag., 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Kempf, Geo. P., 


M. E., 


Victor, 


Iowa. 


Landsberg, Augusl 


;, E. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Blackhawk. 


Lasher, A. C, 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Lawton, J. H., 


E. E., 


Newell, 


Buena Vista. 


Linklater, W. A., 


Ag., 


Dunlap, 


Ontario, Can 


Lummis, G. M., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Malley, Marie, 


G. & D. S., 


Marquisville, 


Polk. 


Marsh, F. H., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Martin, Walter, 


Vet., 


Mitchellville, 


Polk. 


McClain, F. L., 


E. E., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


McClure, Fay, 


C. E., 


Bussey, 


Marion. 


McKim, Effie, 


G. & D. S.. 


Ames, 


Story. , 


McKinney, R. F., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Miller, G. W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Moore, L. H., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Moorhouse, 0. B., 


M. E., 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


Nelson, J. C, 


C. E., 


Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Norman, Roy, 


M. E., 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Norton, C. W., 


Ag., 


Wilton Junct'n, 


Muscatine. 


Otto, W. W., 


Ag., 


Castana, 


Monona. 


Overholser, F. E., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Parks, H. M., 


Min. Eng., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Peshak, Roy E., 


E. E., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Pierce, Bertha, 


G. & D. S., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



287 



Rew, F. A., 
Reynolds, M. C, 
Ritzman, E. G., 
Roland. Clarence, 
Rosenberger, M.. 
Royce, Oscar, 
Sampson, H. O., 
Shealy, A. S., 
Smith, W. W., 
Starr, Nina, 
Starzinger, Otto, 
Streeter, C. H., 
Tillson, H. L., 
Vanatta, Maud, 
Van Pelt, H. G., 
Waggoner, H. I., 
Wall, J. C, 
Whisler, Arthur, 
Wilson, Wm. J., 
Younie, Ethelyn, 



E. E., 
E. E., 

Ag., 

C. E., 

Vet., 

Ag., 

Sc, 

Vet, 

Ag. 

G. & D. S.,' 

E. E., 

C. E., 

E. E., 

G. & D. S., 

Ag., 

E. E., 

Ag., 

E. E., 

Ag., 

G. & D. S., 



Corydon, 

Carlisle, 

Maquoketa, 

Adel, 

Mitchellville, 

Ames, 

Mason City, 

Conrad, 

Nevada, 

Ames, 

Des Moines, 

Cedar Falls, 

Boone, 

Newton, 

Des Moines, 

Primghar, 

Ankeny, 

Fairmount, 

Earlham, 

Odebolt, 



Wayne. 

Warren. 

Jackson, 

Dallas, 

Polk. 

Story. 

Cerro Gordo. 

Grundy. 

Story. 

Story. 

Polk. 

Blackhawk. 

Boone. 

Jasper. 

Polk. 

O'Brien. 

Polk. 

Jasper. 

Madison. 

Sac. 



JUNIORS. 



NAME. COURSE. 

Alvord, Raymond, E. E., 

Anderson, Harriet, G. & D. S., 
Anderson, Isaac, E. E., 

Annegers, Fannie, 2 yr G&DS, 



Austin, H. D., 
Austin, R. G., 
Bartholomew, C. E., 
Bean, G. M., 
Bevan, W. A., 
Bishop, Howard G., 
Bishop, W. C, 
Borsheim, H T., 
Brock, W. I., 
Brockman, H A., 
Brown, Frank L., 
Brown, Nellie, 
Brown, O. L., 
Brunnier, Henry J 
Bruntlett, E. H., 
Buchanan, R. E., 
Buckley, A. R., 
Burton, Harry J., 
Campbell, Claude, 
Carey, John, 
Carter, L. E., 
Cessna, Ethyl, 
Coates, A. B., 



E. E., 

C. E., 

Sc, 

M. E., 

Sc, 

M. E., 

M. E., 

M. E., 

E. E., 

Ag., 

C. E., 

G. & D. S., 

C. E., 

C. E.,/ 

C. E., 

Sc, 

E. E., 

M. E., 

Sc, 

Ag., 

Ag., 

G. & D. S., 

M. E., 



TOWX. 

Marquis, 

Jewell, 

Madrid, 

Stronghurst, 

Prattsburg, 

Webster City, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Des Moines, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

St. Ansgar, 

Council Bluffs, 

Walcott, 

Shelby, 

Dexter, 

Lohrville, 

Manning, 

Wyoming, 

Eagle Grove, 

Shelby, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Charleston. 

Ames, 

Clarinda, 



COUNTY. 

Cherokee. 

Hamilton. 

Boone. 

Illinois. 

New York. 

Hamilton. 

Story. 

Story. 

Polk. 

Story. 

Story. 

Mitchell. 

Pottawattamie. 

Scott. 

Shelby. 

Dallas. 

Calhoun. 

Carroll. 

Jones. 

Wright. 

Shelby. 

Story. 

Story. 

Story. 

South Carolina. 

Story 

Page. 



288 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Corlette, Bernice, 


G. & D. S. 


Ames, 


Story 


Corlette, Glen H., 


M. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Cotton, Ernest, 


C. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Cretsinger, Myrtle, 


Sp., 


Coon Rapids, 


Carroll. 


Crouse, F. H., 


Ag., 


Dike, 


Grundy. 


Curtis, C. E., 


C. E. 


Redfield, 


Dallas. 


Curtiss, Gertrude, 


G. & D. S., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Danforth, H. G., 


Ag. 


Little Cedar, 


Mitchell, 


Dean, H. G., 


E. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dinsmore, Wayne, 


Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Pixon, C. 0., 


Ag., 


Stuart, 


Guthrie. 


Dodge, G. A., 


Vet. 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Drake, J. A., , 


Sp. Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dreher, Irving, 


M. E. 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Eiler, D. W., 


Ag., 


Sioux Rapids, 


Buena Vista 


Ellis, Grace, 


Sp. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Evans, A. L., 


E. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Fogg, Maurice A., 


E. E., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Galley, J. H., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Garberson, J H., 


Sc. 


Alta, 


Buena Vista 


Gaylord, L. T., 


C. E. 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Gersbach, E., 


C. E. 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Gillespie, L. R., 


E. E, 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Graham, Ralph, 


Vet. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gray, Charles, 


Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hamerly, Fred, 


M. E. 


Denmark, 


Lee. 


Hansen, Fred M., 


Ag. 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Haselton, Park, 


E. E. 


Glklden. 


Carroll. 


Heavenhill, Mark, 


Ag. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Hell, Henry, 


Vet. 


New Liberty, 


Scott. 


Holbrook, M. B., 


C. E. 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


Holden, Arthur C, 


E. E. 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Holder, J. A., 


Ag. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Howard, Carlotta, 


G. & D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Howard, Harry, 


Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Huff, C. L., 


E. E. 


, Little Sioux, 


Harrison. 


Hurt, Leslie M., 


Vet. 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Ireland, W. A., 


E. E. 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Johnson, Pearl, 


G. & D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Jones, Edward, 


M. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Jordan, J. W., 


Sc. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


King, Edna, 


G. & D. S. 


, Osceola, 


Nebraska. 


Kingkade, Eva, 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Knowles, Harry H. 


, Min. Eng. 


, Kingsley, 


Plymouth. 


Larson, E. V., 


Sc. 


, Story City, 


Story. 


Leffler, G. V., 


Ag. 


Hillsboro, 


Henry. 


Lewis, 0. E., 


C. E. 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Lewis, R. J., 


C. E. 


Denmark, 


Lee. 


Lincoln, Rush B, 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Lofstedt, 0. B., 


C. E. 


Rippey, 


Greene. 


Lyford, L. L., 


C. E. 


Manly, 


Worth. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



289 



Maulden, C. E., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McDonald, T. H., 


C. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


McMillan, Roscoe, 


E. E., 


Vinton, 


Benton. 


Merritt, M. L., 


Ag., 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 


Miller, A. A., 


Ag, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Miller, 0. H., 


Sc, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Minert, Ray, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Moffitt, Robert, 


Min. Eng., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Moody, L. C, 


M. E., 


Greeley, 


Delaware. 


Morris, Chas., 


,C. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Morris, Lester, 


C. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Mosier, C. R., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Munro, W. S., 


E. E., 


Westchester, 


Washington 


Newcom, R. B., 


Sc, 


Odebolt, 


Sac 


Newcom, Oakes B., 


Sp. Ag., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Newlon, Bertha, 


Sp., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


O'Hearn, J. L., 


C. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Okey, F. M., 


C. E., 


Prescott, 


Adams. 


Otis, W. H., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Overholser, Alice, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Packer, Marion B., 


Ag., 


Rockwell City, 


Calhoun. 


Packer, W. T., 


Sp. Ag., 


Sherwood, 


Calhoun. 


Pew, Geo. B., 


M. E., 


Le Mars, 


Plymouth. 


Phelps, Vera, 2 yr, 


, G. & D. S., 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Phillips, Paul D., 


M. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Pielsticker, F. A., 


E. E., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Poage, L. S., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Purmont, Virgilia, 


2yr G&DS, 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Rapp, C. A., 


Vet., 


Shannon City, 


Union. 


Read, Homer, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Ricksher, Wm., 


E. E., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Ross, E. L., , 


Sc, 


Sutherland, 


O'Brien. 


Rowat, James A., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Rowe, Louise, 


G. & D. S., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Rubel, C. W., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Schooley, Claude, 


E. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Schwarting, Walter, E. E., 


Walcott, 


Scott. 


Scott, A. Hugh, 


E. E., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Scranton, H. L., 


E. E., 


Gilmore City, 


Pocahontas. 


Shaff, J. 0., 


Ag., 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Sharp, Walter, 


Vet, 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Sheldon, DeLa, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Shipman, C. E., 


, C. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Shreve, E. 0., 


, E. E., 


Charter Oak, 


Crawford. 


Simpson, C. D., 


M. E., 


Wall Lake, 


Sac. 


Slater, Bird, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Smith, A. J., 


E. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Smith, Clyde W., 


Min. Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Smith, Clement H., 


Sc, 


Amfis, 


Story. 


Spalding, Ed., 


E. E., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Sperry, A. B., 

19 


E. E., 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 



290 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Starr, Nettie, G. 

Stevens, Edith, 
Sumner, W. D., 
Taggart, Laura, G. 
Tellior, H. O., 
Tenney, Edgar L., 
Terrill, Katherine, G 
Thomas, D. C, 
Tibbetts, C. L., 
Torres, Gonzalo, 
Tourgee, C. H., 
Ulibarri, Ricardo, 
Usry, Eldon, 
Van Zile, Mary, 2 yr. 
Waggoner, George, 
Walter, C. D., 
Welch, Ira J., 
Wickham, J. Q., 
Wilkinson, L. J., 
Williams, H. R., 
Williams, W. H., 
Wilson, C. B., 
Woodard, C. W., 



& D. S. 


Maxwell, 


Story. 


Sc. 


Boone, 


Boone, 


E. E. 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


& D. S. 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Ag. 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt 


M. E. 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


& D. S. 


Grand Junction, 


Greene, 


M. E., 


Col. City, 


Louisa. 


E. E., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Ag. 


Leon, 


Mexico. 


Ag., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Ag., 


Leon, 


Mexico. 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


G.&D.S. 


Winfield, 


Kansas. 


E. E. 


, Primghar, 


O'Brien. 


C. E. 


, Humboldt, 


Humboldt 


Sc. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


C. E. 


Zearing, 


Story. 


E. E., 


Milford, 


Dickinson 


Ag. 


Grandview, 


Louisa. 


E. E. 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


C. E. 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


M. E. 


Denison, 


Crawford. 



SOPHOMORES. 



NAME. 

Adamson, G. J., 
Agg, T. R., 
Anderson, A. O., 
Anderson, J. L., 
Anderson, Keo, 
Anthony, Horace, 
Armstrong, E. O., 
Armstrong, Lucille, C 
Ashby, J. B., 
Atkinson, Ralph W., 
Avey, H. T., 
Baker, Clyde E., 
Barclay, Paul V., 
Barrett, Donald C, 
Bartholomew Jeanette, 
Bechtle, C. R., 
Beisell, W. D., 
Belknap, Cole, 
Benson, Jesse, 
Blackwood, R. E., 
Bliss, R. K., 
Boardman, Glenn, 
Bothell, Prank, 



BOURSE 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


C. E. 


, Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


M. E. 


Oskaloosa, 


Jefferson. 


M, E. 


Lake City, 


Calhoun. 


E. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sc. 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


C. E. 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Ag. 


Marne, 


Cass. 


.&D.S. 


Dyersville, 


Dubuque. 


Ag. 


ureston, 


Union. 


E. E. 


Moorhead, 


Monona. 


M. E. 


Blockton, 


Taylor. 


Ag. 


Britt, 


Hancock. 


Ag. 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


C. E. 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo 


G&DS 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ag. 


Le Mars, 


Plymouth. 


C. E., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Ag. 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


C. E., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Sc, 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Ag., 


Diagonal, 


Ringgold. 


Ag., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Ag., 


Corning, 


Adams. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



291 



Botsford, Walter, 


E. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Boudinot, A. R., 


C. E., 


Davenport. 


Scott. 


Bousquet, C. B., 


Sp., 


Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Bowman, M. L., 


Ag., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Brandt, Iva, 


G. & D. S., 


Mitchellville, 


Polk. 


Budge, Ben, 


Sc, 


dishing, 


Woodbury. 


Buell, James A., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Bullock, Chas. F., 


M. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Caldwell, Fred, 


E. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Cammack, Albert, 


M. E., 


Salem, 


Henry. 


Campbell, Foster, 


Ag., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Campbell, Mabel, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cassidy, Robert, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Caughey, J. A. I., 


Min. Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Caughey, J. W., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Caughey, R. I., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cessna, F. W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Chambers, Viola, 


Sc, 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Claybaugh, W. C, 


Ag., 


Greenfield, 


Adair. 


Coates, Alvin Bruce, E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Coates, Leslie E., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Coffey, R. C, 


Min. Eng., 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Cole, Mildred, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Collette, Ralph, 


Sc, 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Confare, Bert, 


Ag., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Cook, A. L., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Cook, C. R., 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Cooper, Ray D., 


C. E., 


La Porte City, 


Blackhawk 


Cooper, Robert N., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cox, R. L., 


C. E., 


Geneseo, 


New York. 


Crawford, C. J., 


C. E., 


New London, 


Henry. 


Crego, Lila, 


Sp., 


Walker, 


Linn. 


Currie, Clare H., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Curtis, Ernest C, 


C. E„ 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Curtis, James F., 


E. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott, 


Curtis, Robert S., 


Ag., 


Col. Junction, 


Louisa. 


Cutler, Geo. C, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cutler, James L., 


Ag., 


Orchard, 


Mitchell. 


Cutler, P. D., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Daniels, Preston H., E. E., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Davidson, Jessie, 


G. & D. S., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Davidson, Mary, 


G. & D. S., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Dean, Aubrey W., 


E. E., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Dean, L. L., 


C. E., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Deshler, Edwin, 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dickey, John, 


Ag., 


Goose Lake, 


Clinton. 


Dodge, M. V., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Doggett, W. H., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ebersole, 0. M., 


.E E., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Ellis, J. A., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Epley, Arthur C, 


Ag., 


Shell Rock, 


Butler. 



292 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Evinger, M. I., 


C. E., 


Hamburg, 


Fremont. 


Fair, D. H., 


C. E., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Farnum, R., 


Ag., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Fawcett, H. S., 


Sc., 


Salem, 


Ohio. 


Fegles, Don, 


C. E. 


La Porte City, 


Blackhawk. 


Fenstermaker, Sidney, M. E. 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Findley, Chas. D., 


Ag. 


Grimes, 


Polk. 


Folger, L. H., 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Forrest, James, 


C. E. 


Garner, 


Hancock. 


Forrest, Victor E., 


M. E. 


Estherville, 


Emmet. 


Fulton, W. L., 


C. E. 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Fyler, L. S., 


E. E. 


Shell Rock, 


Butler. 


Gabrilsen, Caroline, 


Sc. 


New Hampton, 


Chickasaw. 


Garver, N. B., 


C. E. 


Farmington, 


Van Buren. 


Gillette, Opal, 


Sc. 


Fostoria, 


Clay. 


Goble, Rose, G. 


& D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Greene, Merritt, 


Ag. 


- Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Gribben, Ray, 


Ag. 


Minburn, 


Dallas. 


Griffith, Zaidie, G. 


& D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Grubb, Victor, 


Ag. 


Panora, 


Guthrie. 


Guthrie, Edward S., 


Ag. 


Coin, 


Page. 


Guthrie, J. C., 


Ag. 


Coin, 


Page. 


Hall, C. W., 


Ag. 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Hamm, Lyle S., 


E. E. 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Handley, Ernest E., 


Ag. 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Hazelton, Wm. R., 


E. E. 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


Healy, Walter, 


E. E. 


Britt, 


Hancock. 


Heisey, C. J., 


Ag. 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Hibbard, Stella, G. 


& D. S. 


- Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Hirons, Frank G., 


Ag. 


> Early, 


Sac. 


Hoefacre, F. F., 


Sc. 


p Monticello, 


Jones. 


Hoffman, A. H., 


E. E. 


- Sigourney, 


Keokuk. 


Holden, C. L., 


Ag. 


. Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Hollen, 0. H., 


C. E. 


> Middle River, 


Madison. 


Hook, J. W., 


M. E. 


» Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Horn, A. R., 


E. E. 


. Newton, 


Jasper. 


Howard, Chelsea, 


Ag. 


, New Provid'ce, 


Hardin. 


Hughes, F. J., 


Ag. 


, Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Huston, Ralph, 


Ag. 


, Sperry, 


Des Moines. 


Jacobson, B. C., 


C. E. 


. Walnut, 


Pottawattamie 


Jeffs, Royal, 


Ag. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Jones, C. C, 


C. E. 


, Creston, 


Union. 


Jorgenson, F. F., 


M. E. 


, Denison, 


Crawford. 


Kees, E. W., 


M. E. 


, Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Kelsey, L. D., 


C. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Kennedy, Mae, G. 


& D. S. 


, Collins, 


Story. 


Kimball, G. W., 


E. E. 


, Waterloo, 


Blackhawk. 


King, M. L., 


E. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


King, Lucy M., G. 


& D. S. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Knickerbocker, C. J 


Ag. 


, Fairfax, 


Linn. 


Labberton, Garrett, 


E. E. 


, Orange City, 


Sioux. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



293 



Larson, C. W., 


Sc. 


Meltonville, 


Worth. 


Lasher, J. W., 


M. E. 


dishing, 


Woodbury. 


Lees Earle, 


E. E., 


Brocklyn, 


Poweshiek. 


Leefers, Otis, 


C. E. 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Lund, Jennie, G. 


& D. S. 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Lynch, Wm. J., 


Ag. 


Green Mountain 


Marshall. 


Mahnke, Clarence, 


E. E. 


Parkersburg, 


Butler. 


Maharg, Earl, 


Ag. 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


Martin, W. G., 


Ag. 


Crawfordsville, 


Washington. 


Mathews, C. G., 


E. E. 


Wayland, 


Henry. 


Mattison, Oliver, 


E. E. 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Maynard, R. P., 


C. E., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


McCain, P. L., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McClure, Myrtle, G. 


& D. S. 


Dallas Center, 


Dallas. 


McCulloch, M. E., 


Ag. 


Humeston, 


Wayne. 


McEwen, George, 


C. E. 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


McNall, C. A., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Miller, E. W., 


E. E, 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie 


Mills, George D, 


Sp. Ag. 


Helena, 


Montana. 


Milnes, Genevieve, G. 


& D. S, 


"Wichita, 


Kansas. 


Minert, James, 


M. E., 


Waukon, 


Allamakee. 


Minkler, Fred, 


Ag.. 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Morris, Evan L., 


Sc. 


Linn Grove, 


Buena Vista. 


Morrison, Margaret, G & D S 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Morton, Blanche, 


Sp. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Mosher, Agnes, 


Sc. 


Sioux Rapids, 


Buena Vista. 


Mosher, M. L., 


Ag. 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Mosier, Rachel, G. 


& D. S. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Nash, C. W., 


Ag, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Nelson, Fred 0., 


Ag., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Ness, Henry, 


Ag. 


Somers, 


Calhoun, 


Nichols, S. S., 


M. E., 


Marshalltown. 


Marshall. 


Oppenheim, Ramsey, 


Ag. 


New York, 


New York. 


Otis, Harva R., 


E. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Overholser, Pearl, 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Page, M. L., 


M. E. 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Page, 0. L., 


M. E. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Parks, P. C, 


Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Patton, T J., 


C. E. 


Dexter, 


Dallas. 


Pendray, E. E., Min. Eng. 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Peterson, A. L., 


Ag. 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Peterson, Carl A., 


E. E. 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Peterson, G. C, 


C. E. 


, Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Pettinger, Celestine, G. & D S 


, Cumberland, 


Cass. 


Pitcher, Ray H., 


E. E. 


, Aurelia, 


Cherokee. 


Plumley, H. P., 


E. E. 


, Rockford, 


Floyd. 


Porter, Briggs, 


Ag. 


Centerville, 


Appanoose. 


Powell, A. L., 


Ag. 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Prather, C. M., 


E. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Prouty, Helen, G. 


& D. ,S 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Rasmussen, Fred, 


Ag. 


, Jewell, 


Hamilton. 



294 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Read, Geo. C, 


E. E., 


Reese, Ed., 


E. E., 


Reinbott, Chas., 


Ag., 


Reinhart, M. J., 


C. E., 


Reynolds, C. B., 


E. E., 


Ricker, F. H., 


E. E., 


Roberts, G. A., 


Ag., 


Robey, Fred C, 


M. E., 


Roup, C. J., 


Sc, 


Roy, Frank, 


E. E., 


Rush, H. S., 


E. E., 


Sayre, Herbert A., 


M. E., 


Shuler, B. A., 


E. E., 


Scott, A. B., 


Min. E., 


Scott, C. R., 


Ag., 


Scott, Roe S., 


E. E., 


Shingledecker, C, 


E. E., 


Sifford, R. R., 


Sc, 


Smith, Howard M., 


E. E., 


Smith, Irving R., 


M. E., 


Smith, Stuart H., 


Ag., 


Smith, Walton L., 


Ag., 


Stephens, Lola, 


Sc, 


Stevens, Imogene, G. 


& D. S., 


Stimson, Robert S., 


Ag., 


Stocum, A. P., 


E. E,. 


Stoufer, D. B., 


M. E., 


Stout, E. A.. 


Ag., 


Taylor, Floyd F., 


M. E., 


Tener, W. A., 


Ag., 


Thomas, Elbert, 


Ag., 


Thompson, Winifred, 


G & D S 


Tillotson, Edwin, 


E. E., 


Trostel, George, 


Ag., 


Truman, W. D., 


C. E., 


VanDuzer, Guy, 


Sc, 


VanDuzer, Pearl, G. 


& D. S., 


Wallace, N. R., 


C. E., 


Walton, Percy J., 


E. E., 


Warden, Marvin, 


C E., 


Wark, R. S., 


C. E., 


Warren, Carroll, 


C. E., 


Warren, Frank, 


M. E., 


V'/arrington, W. B., 


C. E„ 


Watson, E. B., 


Ag., 


Watts, Alice, G. 


& D. S., 



Wells, Reine, G. & D. S., 

Western, Clarence A., Ag., 
White, H. C, Min. Eng., 

Wiley, Erma, Sc, 

Wilhelm, Arthur L., C. E., 



Elburn, 

Des Moines, 

Grinnell, 

Anthon, 

Council Bluffs, 

Grinnell, 

Marathon, 

Waukon, 

Ames, 

LeRoy, 

Colfax, 

Perry, 

Garner, 

Shelby, 

Cambridge, 

Glidden, 

Audubon, 

Wall Lake, 

Nashua, 

Milwaukee, 

Monticello, 

Council Bluffs. 

Lohrville, 

Boone, 

Marion, 

Sanborn, 

Des Moines, 

Stout, 

Algona, 

Brevard, 

Green Mountain 

Cambridge, 

Inwood, 

Des Moines, 

Iowa Falls, 

Ontario, 

Ontario, 

Albia, 

Washington, 

Van Cleve, 

Adair, 

Knoxville, 

Boone, 

Webster City, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

Nevada. 

Beaconsf *,id 

Cedar Rapids, 

Castana, 

Muscatine, 



Illinois. 

Polk. 

Poweshiek. 

Woodbury. 

Pottawattamie, 

Poweshiek. 

Buena Vista. 

Allamakee. 

Story. 

Minnesota. 

Jasper. 

Dallas. 

Hancock 

Shelby. 

Story. 

Carroll. 

Audubon. 

Sac. 

Chickasaw. 

Wisconsin. 

Jones. 

Pottawattamie. 

Calhoun. 

Boone. 

Linn. 

O'BrieD. 

Polk. 

Grundy. 

Kossuth. 

North Carolina. 

Marshall. 

Story. 

Lyons. 

Polk. 

Hardin. 

Story. 

Story. 

Monroe. 

Washington. 

Marshall. 

Adair. 

Marion. 

Boone. 

Hamilton. 

Story. 

Story. 

Story. 

Ringgold. 

Linn. 

Monona. 

Muscatine. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



295 



Wilkes, Rolla C, 


C. E. 


, Folletts, 


Clinton. 


Williams, Lester A., 


M. E. 


, Postville, 


Allamakee. 


Williams, Milo, 


C. E. 


, Manly, 


Worth. 


Wilson, R. E., 


Ag. 


, Berlin, 


Tama. 


Wood, Fred, 


M. E. 


, Sac City, 


Sac. 


Woodard, D. C, 


E. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Woodman, Forest E., 


M. E. 


. Ames, 


Story. 


Woodman, Lois, G. 


& D. S, 


. Ames, 


Story. 


Woodruff, Theressa, < 


S & D S 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Woodruff, C. W., 


C. E. 


, Glenwood, 


Mills. 


Woody, A. E., 


M. E. 


, Newton, 


Jasper. 


Wright, Arthur E., 


E. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Wright, John G., 


C. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Wyman, Arthur, 


M. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Zanke, G. J., 


E. E. 


, Algona, 


Kossuth. 




FRESHMEN. 




NAME. 


COUBSE 


TOWN. 


COL NT y. 


Adams, Paul, 


Ag. 


, Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Adams, R. K., 


Sp. 


, Solon, 


Johnson. 


Alexander, C. C, 


Sp. 


, Conrad, 


Grundy. 


Akin, Lee, 


Vet. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Anderson, Arthur, 


Ag. 


, Brayton, 


Audubon. 


Annette, Leslie, 


Sp. 


, Spencer, 


Clay. 


Anstey, John, 


Vet. 


, Massena, 


Cass. 


Armstrong, C. L., 


M. E. 


, Dyersville, 


Dubuque. 


Arthur, Ernest, 


Ag. 


, Millersburg, 


Iowa. 


Atherton, A. C, 


E. E. 


, Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Atkinson, W., 


Ag. 


, Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Austin, H. C, 


M. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Austin, Roland S., 


E. E. 


. Clarion, 


Wright. 


Ayres, Frank, 


E. E. 


, Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Ayres, Herbert S., 


C. E. 


, Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Babbitt, H. K., 


C. E. 


, Ottawa, 


Illinois. 


Bailey, John, 


Vet. 


, Emmetsburg, 


Palo Alto. 


Bailey, Frank, 


Vet. 


, Emmetsburg, 


Palo Alto. 


Bailey, Robert W., 


M. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Bair, Clarence, 


C. E. 


, Avoca, 


Pottawattamie 


Baker, R. L., 


M. E. 


, Col. Junction. 


Louisa. 


Barnes, W. A., 


Vet. 


, St. Charles, 


Madison. 


Bauch, R. M., 


Sp. Ag. 


, Miles, 


Iowa. 


Beach, Glen, 


C. E. 


, Clarion, 


Wright. 


Bechtelheimer, A. E. 


, C. E. 


, Oto, 


Woodbury. 


Beyer, H. Otley, Min. Eng. 


, Edgewood, 


Clayton. 


Bickel, Karl, 


Sc. 


, McGregor, 


Clayton, 


Black, Michael, 


C. E. 


, Boone, 


Boone. 


Bobst, A. E., 


M. E. 


, Geneva, 


Franklin. 


Bobst, J. A., 


Sp. 


, Geneva, 


Franklin. 


Booth, Nathan, 


C. E. 


, Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Bourne, J. Nye, 


Sc. 


, Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 



296 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Bowen, Marshall B 


., Min. Eng, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Boyd, George R., 


C. E., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Boylan, Ray, 


M. E., 


Waucoma, 


Fayette. 


Bridges, Earl, 


Sp., 


Oskaloosa, 


Jefferson. 


Brintnell, Earl P., 


Sc, 


Winthrop, 


Buchanan. 


Brown, A. R., 


M. E., 


Marengo, 


Iowa. 


Brown, C. E., 


Sp., 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Brown, Wesley, 


Ag., 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Buckman, Harry, 


Ag., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Burnap, S. M., 


Ag., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Burt, Asher C, 


Sc, 


St. Louis, 


Missouri. 


Busby, George, 


M. E., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Cadwell, Carlos, 


C. E., 


Dunlap, 


Harrison. 


Camblin, C. K., 


E. E., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Campbell, Fae, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Campbell ,Guy R., 


C. E, 


Manila, 


Crawford. 


Campbell, J R., 


Ag., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Canier, Ivadell, 


Sc, 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Carrier, Ray, 


M. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Cave, J. H., 


C. E., 


Correctionville, 


Woodbury. 


Cave, Roy A., 


Ag., 


Randalia, 


Fayette. 


Chalupnick, J. C, 


Ag., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Childs, George, 


E. E., 


Clarinda, 


Page. 


Claxton, Robert, 


Ag., 


Randalia, 


Fayette. 


Cleghorn, Ruth, 


G. & D. S., 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


Clements, C. W., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Clifton, Clifford R. 


E. E., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Cluttier, A. C, 


Sp., 


Farnhamville, 


Calhoun. 


Coates, Samuel F. 


Ag., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Coffin, Martha, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Coggswell, Don, 


E. E., 


Le Roy, 


Minnesota. 


Cohagan, Orville, 


Ag., 


; Blakesburg, 


Wapello. 


Cole, Clarence, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cole, W. B., 


Min. Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Collison, F. R., 


Vet., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Compton, Leon R. 


Ag., 


Elmira, 


New York. 


Conover, J. A., 


Sp. Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cooper, Harry J., 


E. E., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Copeland, C. B., 


Sp., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Corning, Stanley, 


Ag., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Cotton, H. E., 


C. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Blackhawk. 


Coverdale, J. W., 


Ag., 


Delmar, 


Clinton. 


Cowgill, Ralph, 


Sp. Ag., 


West Branch, 


Cedar. 


Cramer, Eva, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Crawford, J. B., 


M. E., 


Lohrville, 


Calhoun. 


Crossley, Bruce, 


Ag., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie, 


Crouse, R. W., 


Ag., 


Dike, 


Grundy. 


Curl, Daily M., 


E. E., 


Defiance, 


Shelby. 


Dale, R. Burdette, 


M. E., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Davis, D wight, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Davis, Ralph, 


Min. Eng., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



297 



Day, Clark B., C. E., 

Dean, Preston, Ag., 

Decker, Earl, Ag., 
Deltman, F., Sp. E. E., 
DonCarlos, Solon J., C. E., 

Doty, H. L., Sc, 

Dow, A J., E. E., 

Draper, Franklin, Ag., 

Drummond, G., Vet., 

Dunlavey, W. A., Vet., 

Dykstra, R. R., Vet., 

Eastman, W. R., Ag., 

Eastwood, George, Ag., 

Ege, C. R., C. E., 
Eichelsdorfer, A F., Min. Eng, 



Elliott, Jesse, 
Elwood, W. D., 
Emmons, E. P., 
Espe, Theodore, 
Federlein, F., 
Ficke, Philip H., 
Fish, Don, 
Fisher, George J 
Fleming, Ray, 
Fleming, Thos., 
Flynn, Millie, 
Forsyth, L. R., 
Foster, F. H., 
Foster, W. L., 
Fraser, Jessie, 
Fraseur, Edith, 
Frechtling, Carl H., 
Frederick, H. J., 
Frevert, Gustave, 
Fry, Samuel A., 
Fryberger, Boyd, 
Fuller, Rolla S., 
Furrow, Harry, 
Furrow, R. A., 
Gambell, Floyd R., 
Gaskill, Ona, 
George, Anna, 
Gilchrist, Willard D 
Gillespie, Paul, 
Glaisyer, W. V., 
Gordon, T. E., 
Gordon, Waldron M., 
Gould, H. J., 
Goulden, Robert S., 
Grant, J. Arthur, 
Gray, H .W., 



Ag., 

E. E., 

Ag., 

C. E,. 

Ag., 

M. E., 

Ag., 

E. E., 

E. E., 

Sp. Min. 

Sc, 

Ag., 

Ag., 

C. E,. 

G. & D. S., 

Sc, 

Sp., 

Vet, 

Sp., 

Ag., 

Sp. Ag., 

Ag., 

C. E., 

C. E., 

Sc, 

Ag., 

Sc, 

Vet., 

E. E., 

E. E., 

Vet., 

Vet., 

C. E., 

E. E., 

Sc, 

C. E., 



Des Moines, 

Adair, 

Mt. Vernon, 

Sibley, 

Greenfield, 

Webster City, 

Clarion, 

Sutherland, 

Dixon, 

Bloomfield, 

Orange City, 

Nashua, 

Ames, 

Mason City, 

Rock Island, 

Woodward, 

Sac City, 

Libertyville, 

Eagle Grove, 

Atalissa, 

Dubuque, 

Adel, 

Greene. 

Storm Lake, 

Hocking, 

Postville, 

Griswold, 

Glidden, 

Agency, 

Paullina, 

Tipton, 

Hamilton, 

Ames, 

Odebolt, 

Corydon, 

Eagle Grove, 

Sutherland, 

Tripoli. 

Tripoli, 

Hedrick, 

Sutherland, 

Sioux Falls, 

Ontario, 

Atlantic, 

Des Moines, 

Ames, 

Ames, 

New Sharon, 

Council Bluffs, 

Vail, 

Sergeant Bluffs, 



Polk. 

Adair. 

Linn. 

Osceola. 

Adair. 

Hamilton. 

Wright. 

O'Brien. 

Scott. 

Davis. 

Sioux. 

Chickasaw. 

Story. 

Cerro Gordo. 

Illinois. 

Dallas. 

Sac. 

Jefferson. 

Wright. 

Muscatine. 

Dubuque. 

Dallas. 

Butler. 

Buena Vista. 

Monroe. 

Fayette. 

Cass. 

Carroll. 

Wapello. 

O'Brien. 

Cedar. 

Ohio. 

Story. 

Sac. 

Wayne. 

Wright. 

O'Brien. 

Bremer. 

Bremer. 

Keokuk. 

O'Brien. 

South Dakota. 

Story. 

Cass. 

Polk. 

Story. 

Story. 

Mahaska. 

Pottawattamie. 

Crawford. 

Woodbury. 



298 



iowa state college 



Green, F. C, 


E. E., 


Mondamin, 


Harrison. 


Greer, Floy, G 


. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gregory, C. V., 


Ag., 


Burchinal, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Griffin, Clyde, 


Sp. Ag., 


Manson, 


Calhoun. 


Griffin, J. L., 


Ag., 


Buckingham, 




Guernsey, S. C., 


Ag., 


Confidence, 


Wayne. 


Guibert, 0. E., 


C. E., 


Pittsburg, 


Pennsylvania 


Guthrie, Geo. B., 


Sc, 


Winthrop, 


Buchanan. 


Haas, John M., ! 


3p. M. E., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Hall, A. G., 


C. E., 


Moravia, 


Appanoose. 


Haller, C. L, 


Ag., 


Farley, 


Dubuque. 


Halpenny, R. H., 


E. E., 


Corydon, 


Wayne. 


Hanson, E. W., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hanssen, Henry M., 


E. E., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Harriman, Chas. B., 


Ag., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Harris, Earnest M., 


M. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Harris, J. W., 


E. E., 


Seward, 


Illinois. 


Hasenmiller, Fred, 


Vet, 


Dixon, 


Scott. 


Hauser, B. B., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Stt>ry. 


Hawn, John, 


Ag., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Heberling, C. A., 


C. E., 


Atalissa, 


Muscatine. 


Hicks, Fred, 


Ag., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Hicks, H. P., 


Sp., Ag., 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Hicks, L. J., 


E. E,. 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Hidinger, Leroy, 


C. E., 


Prescott, 


Adams. 


Higgins, Fosse, 


Ag., 


Keswick, 


Keokuk. 


Hill, Alva F., 


Ag., 


DeWitt, 


Clinton. 


Hinken, Albert, 


Vet., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Hodgson, C. R., 


C. E., 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Hoffman, R. C., 


Sp. Ag., 


Ottumwa. 


Wapello. 


Homans, C. B., 


M. E., 


Fairfax, 


Linn. 


Hoppe, E. V., 


C. E., 


Hamburg, 


Fremont. 


Horlacher, F S., 


Ag., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Hulsizer, Guy, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Humbert, Eugene, 


Ag., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Hunt, John M., 


Ag., 


Ackley, 


Hardin. 


Hunt, W. S., 


Sp. Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hurd, Elmer, 


E. E., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Huston, Clark, 


Ag., 


Col. Junction, 


Louisa. 


Hutchins, Irving, 


Ag., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Hutchinson, George 


A., M. E., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Hyde, Wilber, 


Sp. Sc. 


Hull, 


Sioux. 


Ickis, L. S., 


E. E., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Ingels, Fred G., 


Ag., 


Meriden, 


Cherokee. 


Jackson, May L., 


Sc, 


Woodriver, 


Nebraska. 


Jacobs, Thos. D., 


E. E., 


Mt. Auburn, 


Benton. 


Jenkins, Carl, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story 


Jenkins, John, 


Sp. Ag., 


Col. Junction, 


Louisa. 


Jinderlee, C. F., 


Sp. Ag., 


Elma, 


Howard. 


Johnson, A. M., 


Sp. Ag., 


Greene, 


Butler. 


Johnson, Arthur B., 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



299 



Johnson, D. F., 


M. E., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Johnson, Earl, 


Sp. Ag., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Johnson, F. A., 


E. E., 


Marquis, 


Cherokee. 


Johnson, James P., 


Vet., 


Kimballton, 


Audubon. 


Johnson, L. P., 


Ag.. 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Johnson, Olla, G 


\. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Johnson, J. W., 


C. E., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Jolls, Roy, 


Vet, 


Waterloo, 


Blackhawk. 


Jones, Geo. H., 


E. E., 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


Jones, John W., 


Ag., 


Ayrshire, 


Palo Alto. 


Jones, Roland E., 


Sp. Ag., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Jory, E. N., 


E. E., 


Galva, 


Ida. 


Keen, C. T. 


Sp. M. E., 


Le Grand, 


Marshall. 


Kelsey, Bruce, 


Ag., 


Dawson, 


Dallas. 


Kelsey, Lewis E., 




Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


Kemp, Warren, 


Ag., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Kendall, Chas., 


Ag., 


Luther, 


Boone. 


Kennedy, Maud, 


Sc, 


Collins, 


Story. 


Kenny, Guy R. 


E. E., 


Early, 


Sac. 


Kibby, A. S., 


M. E., 


Audubon. 


Audubon, 


King, P. M., 


E E., 


Bagley, 


Guthrie. 


Kinzer, Horace G., 


Sp. Ag., 


Bangor, 


Marshall. 


Kirby, E. E., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Knox, Walter, 


M. E., 


Marquis, 


Cherokee. 


Knox, R. G., 


Ag., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Koch, Wm., 


M. E., 


Ackley, 


Hardin. 


Kohler, Alfred, 


Ag., 


Haverhill, 


Marshall. 


Kraetsch, Carl, 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Kuhn, W. H., 


Sp. Ag., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie, 


Lambing, Herbert, 


Ag., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Lanphear, Fred W., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Larson, E. C, 


M. E., 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Lau, Alfred, 


Sp. M. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Lauman, Philip G., 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Lawrence, C. W., 


Ag., 


Braddyville, 


Page. 


Lawrence, J. A., 


E. E., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Leininger, Frank, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Lensink, George, 


E. E., 


Hull, 


Sioux. 


Liebberknecht, E. W., Sp. Ag., 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Little, H. G., 


Sc, 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Lodwick, G., 


Min. Eng., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Long, Loren, 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Lundeen, Leonard, 


Ag., 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Lungren, 0. E., 


M. E., 


Gowrie, 


Webster. 


Lyman, Ray A., 


C. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Mabie, I. P., 


M. E., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Madson, B. A., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Madson, Mathilda, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Madson, Wm. E., 


Vet, 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Mallette, F. G., 


Ag., 


Garden Grove, 


Decatur. 


Malone, Clyde, 


Sp. M. E., 


Wyoming, 


Jones. 



300 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Maris, Justin H., 


E. E., 


Guthrie Center, 


Guthrie. 


Marsden, A., 


E. E., 


Col Junction, 


Louisa. 


Martin, .J A., 


Sp. M. E., 


Gaza, 


O'Brien. 


Massure, Mary V., 


G. & D. S., 


Redfield, 


Dallas. 


Maxwell, W. D., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McBeath, M. W., 


Sp. Ag., 


Whiting, 


Monona. 


McConnell, Earl, 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McConnell, E. V., 


Ag., 


Winthrop, 


Buchanan. 


MacCorkindale, Jessie, 








G. & D. S., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


McCormick, C. M., 


E. E., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


McCune, Emily, 


Sc., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McCune, H. A., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McCurry, Laura, 


G. & D. S., 


Milo, 


Kansas. 


McGregor, Andrew 


M. E., 


Rockford, 


Illinois. 


McKinley, Angie, 


G. & D. S., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


McKinley, James M., Ag., 


Humeston, 


Wayne. 


McLain,' W. H., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McMillan, A. R., 


Sp. Ag., 


Dunkerton, 


Blackhawk. 


McPherson, R. W., 


C. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


McVicker, A. B., 


Ag., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Meacham, H. A., 


Ag., 


Clay, 


Washington. 


Meiser, Frank, 


Ag., 


Solon, 


Johnson. 


Melhus, I. E., 


Sc, 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Meredith, J. A., 


Sp. Ag., 


Marne, 


Cass. 


Metcalf, J. R., 


Sc, 


Correctionville, 


Woodbury. 


Middleton, W. G., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Miller, H. M.. 


E. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


Miller, Paul B„ 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Miller, Roy, 


C. E., 


Estherville, 


Emmet. 


Minassian, T. A., 


Min. Eng., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Mirick, Irving A., 


E. E., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Moffitt, Mabel, 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Moore, H. I., 


C. E., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Moorehead, J. A., 


E. E., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Moorhous, B. F., 


Sp., 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Moreno, Ruben, 


Sp. Vet., 


La Platte, 


ArgentVe Rep.S.A 


Morford, W. C, 


Sp., 


Humeston, 


Wayne. 


Morrow, Harry, 


Ag., 


Conrad, 


Grundy. 


Moses, Mabel, 


G. & D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Muffly, G., 


M. E., 


Sumner, 


Bremer. 


Murphy, John, 


Sp. Ag., 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Mumby, Ed., 


M. E., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Nash, Nellie, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Nfcylor, E. C., 


Ag., 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Nelson, Max, 


E. E., 


Pomeroy, 


Calhoun. 


Nelson, Alice, 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Newcomb, Otis, W. 


M. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Norman, Alvah, 


Ag., 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Northrop, Clarence A., Ag., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Nye, Henry, 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



301 



Ogden, Karl K., 


E. E. 


, New Sharon, 


Mahaska. 


O'Brien, Floyd, 


Vet. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


O'Healy, Jerry, 


C. E. 


, Avoca, 


Pottawattamie, 


Okey, James, 


Sp. Ag. 


, Prescott, 


Adams, 


Packer, Earle, 


C. E. 


, Bonaparte, 


Van Buren. 


Paine, C. E., 


C. E. 


, Burt, 


Kossuth. 


Paine, Raymond, 


Ag. 


, Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Palmer, Ray, 


C. E. 


, Tripoli, 


Bremer. 


Palmer, Warren, 


Sp. Ag. 


, Wellman, 


Washington. 


Parkinson, Fred B., 


Sci. 


, Kirkman, 


Shelby. 


Patch, James, 


E. E. 


, Clarion, 


Wright. 


Paxton, I. B., 


Vet. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Pechstein, Paul, 


Ag. 


, Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Peck, Walter, 


M. E. 


, Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Perrin, A. C, 


M. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Perrin, Phillip, 


Vet. 


, Mapleton, 


Monona. 


Perry, Frank, 


Sci. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Peshak, Irving, 


Sp. Ag. 


Plymouth, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Peterson, Geo., 


Sp. Eng. 


Leavenworth, 


Kansas. 


Pierce, Erna, 


E. E. 


Emporia, 


Kansas. 


Pimlott, John, 


Ag. 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Pinkerton, W. C, 


C. E. 


Clarinda. 


Page. 


Pitts, Gideon S., 


E. E. 


Alton, 


Sioux. 


Pitts, C. W., 


Sci. 


Alton, 


Sioux. 


Porter, Albert, 


Ag. 


Centerville, 


Appanoose. 


Porter, Inez, G 


. & D. S. 


Woodbine, 


Harrison. 


Prather, R. C., 


E. E, 


Griswold, 


Cass. 


Prime, Vera, 


Sci. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Proper, Louis J., 


Vet. 


Bonaparte, 


Van Buren. 


Pullen, Gail C, 


Ag. 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


Putt, Lyle M., 


Ag. 


Afton, 


Union. 


Quertermous, R. C, 


E. E. 


, Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Raber, L. H., 


C. E. 


Stuart, 


Guthrie. 


Railsback, G. K., 


Sp. Eng. 


Palo, 


Linn. 


Railsback, Clifford, 


Ag, 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Reading, Chas., 


E. E. 


Adaza, 


Greene. 


Reuling, Walter E., 


M. E. 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Reyes, Julio, 


Ag. 


Buenos Ayres, 


South America. 


Rhodes, John W., 


M. E., 


Stuart, 


Guthrie. 


Rieke, F. C, 


Ag. 


Blairstown, 


Benton. 


Ritland, L. J., 


Sp. Ag., 


Roland, 


Story. 


Rittgers, John H., 


Sp. Ag., 


Grimes, 


Polk. 


Robb, Luella, 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Roe, C. C, 


Sp. Ag., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Rogers, H. C, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ross, F. R., 


C. E., 


Oelwein, 


Fayette. 


Rowat, Frank, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Rowe, Erwin A., 


Ag., 


Chapin, 


Franklin. 


Rowley, L. H., 


E. E., 


Vail, 


Crawford. 


Rowell, Ross E., 


E. E., 


Ruthven, 


Palo Alto. 


Rubel, W. C, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 



302 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Ruehlman, William, 


Ag., 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Rutledge, I. C, 


E. E., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Sanford, Arthur L., 


E. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie 


Sawyer, Mabel, 


Sp., 


Gilbert, 


Story. 


Sayre, E. A., 


Sci., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Schaeffer, L. L., 


Ag., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright 


Schreiber, Walter A., 


Sp., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Schulte, Louise, G 


. & D. S., 


McGregor, 


Clayton. 


Schulte, J. J., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Scott, Ada, G. 


& D. S., 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Secor, A. J., 


Ag., 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Secor, Ernest, 


Sp., 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Shaw, Genevieve. G. 


& D. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Shaw, Winifred, G. 


& D. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Sheehan, Dan, 


Sp. Ag., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Schiele, Arthur, 


Ag.. 


Bluegrass, 


Scott. 


Shimer, Fred L., 


E. E., 


Brooklyn, 


Poweshiek. 


Shinkle, Ira B., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Simpson, Geo. P., 


M. E., 


Victor, 


Iowa. 


Simpson, H. H., 


Sp. Ag., 


Knoxville, 


Marlon . 


Skelly, F. V., 


E. E., 


De Witt, 


Clinton. 


Skubal, F. V., 


C. E., 


Riverside, 


Washington. 


Sloane, Fred M., 


C. E., 


McGregor, 


Clayton. 


Slutz, C. S., 


E. E., 


Galva, 


Ida. 


Smith, Alton, G. 


& D. S., 


Dyersville, 


Dubuque. 


Smith, D. D., 


M. E., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbur*', 


Smith, E. D., 


Sp. Ag., 


DeWitt, 


Clinton. 


Smith, Earle, 


E. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Smith, Paul, 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Snavely, Frank, 


E. E,. 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 


Solomonson, C, 


Ag., 


Estherville, 


Emmett. 


Sparks, Louise, 


Sci., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbiyry. 


Stephenson, R. W., 


E. E., 


Seward, 


Neb?~aska. 


Stevens, Genevieve, 








Sp. G. 


& D. S., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Stewart, G. W., 


C. E., 


Packwood, 


Jefferson. 


Stillwell, J D., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stivers, Lucian B., 


Sci., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Stone, Earle, 


Ag., 


Massena, 


Cass. 


Stouder, K. W., 


Vet, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Strong, L. J., 


Vet., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Stuart, A. A., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stuart, LeRoy, 


Ag., 


West Branch. 


Cedar. 


Stubblefield, David, 




Jefferson, 


Greene. 


Stuhler, Kate, G. 


& D. S., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Sullivan, R. J., 


Sp. Ag., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Summers, J. F., 


Sp. Ag., 


Malvern, 


Mills. 


Tarr, Robert S, 


C. E., 


Moravia, 


Appanoose. 


Tate, Charles H., 


Vet., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Templeton, E. G., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



:m 



Terrazas, Wm., F., 


Ag. 


, Chihuahua, 


Mexico. 


Thompson, Irwin, 


Ag. 


, Jamaica, 


Guthrie. 


Thompson, Theodore 


Ag. 


, Grand Forks, 


North Dakota. 


Thompson, Will, 


Ag. 


, Ayreshire, 


Palo Alto. 


Throp, F., 


M. E. 


Carson, 


Pottawattamie 


Tinsley, Geo. W., 


M. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Tooley, Belle, G. 


& D. S. 


. New Hampton, 


Chickasaw. 


Tooley, Etta, G. 


& D. S. 


, New Hampton, 


Chickasaw. 


Tostenson, M. T., 


C. E. 


, LeGrande, 


Marshall. 


Tracy, Paul, Min. Eng. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Trafton, Frank J., 


Vet. 


, Newton, 


Jasper. 


Treman, Alden J., 


Vet. 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Troger, Leslie, 


Ag. 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Trowbridge, Robert, 


Ag. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Turner, Frank, E., 


Ag. 


, Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Turner, Homer E., 


C. E. 


, Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Turner, H. H., 


C. E. 


, Atlantic, 


Cass. 


VanHouten, A. W., 


C. E, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Walker, Walter J., 


M. E, 


Paton, 


Greene. 


Wallace, J. M., 


Ag. 


Allerton, 


Wayne. 


Walters, Blanche, G. 


& D. S. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Warnock, E. S., 


M. E, 


Defiance, 


Shelby. 


Watson, John H., 


C. E. 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Watts, Thomas, 


Sp. Ag. 


Preston, 


Jackson. 


Watts, Sylvia, 


Sci. 


Gooselake, 


Clinton. 


Way, Leo C, 


M. E. 


Carson, 


Pottawattamie. 


Weber, W. I., 


Ag. 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Weeks, Henry J., 


Ag., 


Guthrie Center, 


Guthrie. 


Weise, A. M., 


E. E. 


Mclntyre, 


Mitchell. 


Welch, G. B., 


C E. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Wells, C. H., 


C. E. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Wheeler, W. H, 


M E. 


Madrid, 


Boone. 


White, J. W., 


Ag. 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


White, J. W., 


E. E. 


W T oodbine, 


Harrison. 


White, Milan E., 


C. E. 


Clarion, 


Wright. 


Whiting, C. N„ 


Sp. Ag. 


Whiting, 


Monona. 


Wichman, John, 


E. E. 


Walcott, 


Scott. 


Williams, Loretta, G. 


& D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Williams, Thomas R., 


E. E. 


Sutherland, 


O'Brien. 


Willits, E. V., 


Ag. 


Union, 


Hardin. 


Wilson, A. R., 


Sp. Ag. 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Wilson, F. W., 


E. E. 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Wilson, Mary M., 


Sci. 


Cincinnati, 


Appanoose. 


Wilson, M. L., 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wilson, T. J., 


Ag. 


Columbia, 


Marion. 


Wilson, Wayne, 


M. E, 


Denmark. 


Lee. 


Wisner, Scott, 


Ag., 


Omega, 


Nebraska. 


Wolfe, Ed., 


C. E., 


DeWitt, 


Clinton. 


Wolfe, Jerry, 


Vet. 


Lost Nation, 


Clinton. 


Woods, Jim F., 


E. E., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 



304 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Woodworth, L., 


Sp. C. E., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Worswick, Albert, 


Ag., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Wosoba, Henry, 


Ag. 


Oxford Jet., 


Jones. 


Wright, L. G., 


C. E. 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Wygle, Fred., 


Ag. 


Clarksville, 


Butler. 


Young, A. L., 


E. E. 


Manson, 


Calhoun. 


Ziliox, C. T., 


Ag. 


Hamilton, 


Ohio. 


Zirbel, C. J., 


M. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 




ACADEMIC. 




NAME. 


COTJESE, 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Akin, Frank, 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Alexander, Clifford, 


Eng., 


Conrad, 


Grundy. 


Allen, Bertha, G. 


& D. S., 


Arnold's Park, 


Dickinson. 


Andrews, Frank L., 


Eng., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo 


Armstrong, Mabel, 


Sci., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Ashby, H. P., 


Sp., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Aulmann, Robert, 


Eng., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Bagwill, W. J, 


Sci. 


Millington, 


Illinois. 


Baker, John R., 


Eng. 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Barton, Mabel, G 


. & D. S. 


Kirkman, 


Shelby. 


Bateman, Lottie, 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Beaty, G. R., 


Ag. 


Guthrie Center, 


Guthrie. 


Biggs, Frank, 


Eng. 


Anita, 


Cass. 


Bishop, Herbert, 


Eng, 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Bixler, Burr, 


Ag. 


Hoyt, 


Adams. 


Black, J. R., 


Eng. 


Jefferson, 


Jefferson. 


Botsford, H. E., 


Ag. 


, Corning, 


Adams. 


Bourrassa, Alex, 


Eng.. 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Bowdish, C. B., 


Ag. 


Waubeek, 


Linn. 


Boyd, Carrie, 


Sp. 


Story City, 


Story. 


Brader, Earl R., 


Eng. 


Sloan, 


Woodbury. 


Bradford, Gertrude, 


G & D S 


Ames, 


Story. 


Brandt, James, 


Eng. 


Mitchellville, 


Polk. 


Brockman, Roy, 


Eng. 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Brown, 0. H., 


Eng. 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Bubke, Henry, 


Eng. 


Battle Creek, 


Ida. 


Burdette, Bonnie, 


Sp. 


Augusta, 


Illinois. 


Burkhart, Harry, 


Eng. 


Anita, 


Cass. 


Burns, Juan T., 


Sc. 


Chihuahua, 


Mexico. 


Butterworth, Arthur, Eng. 


Dow City, 


Crawford. 


Canady, Arthur, 


Eng. 


Gilbert, 


Story. 


Carpenter, A. R., 


Eng. 


Griswold, 


Cass. 


Cattell, Herbert, 


Eng. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Caughey, Alice, 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Clark, J. Cameron, 


Eng. 


Calmar, 


Winneshiek. 


Clausen, Dora, 


Sci. 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Cooper, Earl E., 


Eng. 


, Manson, 


Calhoun. 


Cozzens, Frank S., 


Eng. 


, Colo, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



305 



Crary, Elisha J., 
Crego, Ethel, 
Crouse, Fred L., 
Cutler, Wm., 
Cutter, F. S., 
Da.venport, Mary, 
Davey, E. A., 
Davis, Earl W., 
DeKlotz, John, 
DeKlotz, Rose, G. 
DeVault, Ralph J., 
Dickey, James, 
Dillon, Sidney F., 
Dixons, L. G., 
Doolittle, Irwin, 
Dudgeon, W S., 
Dunham, Ralph, 
Eddleman, M. R., 
Eno, Frank, 
Ericksen, Wesley, 
Fenton, Nellie, 
Forman, Elva, 
Forsbeck, Carl D., 
Garmire, Chas., F., 
Gilchrist, Jennie, Sp 
Gillette, Grace, G. 
Graham, Louis, 
Goff, C. E„ 
Grant, Florence, G. 
Grayson, Gertrude, 
Green, G. G., 
Grefe, Fred, 
Griffin, John F., 
Grimsell, Henry, 
Gruppe, Wm, 
Hammond., W. R., 
Hanson, Harry, 
Hanson, Martin H., 
Harding, Chas. B., 
Harding, C. S., 
Harvey, Earl, 
Hegland, Mary, G. 
Heinrich, Geo., 
Helfinstine, Ethyle, 
Henningsen, H. H., 
Hester, Morris, 
Hill, H. T., 
Hoebel, Otto, 
Hoggart, Herman, 
Hollenbeak, R. B., 
Holmes, Jas., 



Sci. 


St. Olaf, 


Clayton. 


Sci. 


Walker, 


Linn. 


Eng. 


Sheffield, 


Franklin. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


, Milwaukee, 


Wisconsin. 


Sci. 


, Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Eng. 


, Pomeroy, 


Calhoun. 


Sci. 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Eng. 


, Kirkman, 


Shelby. 


& D. S. 


Kirkman, 


Shelby. 


Eng. 


. Earlham, 


Madison, 


Eng. 


Delhi, 


Delaware, 


Eng. 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Sci. 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Eng. 


, Dunlap, 


Harrison. 


Sci. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Eng. 


Havelock, 


Pocahontas. 


Eng. 


Fairfield, 


Jefferscn. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci. 


West Branch, 


Cedar. 


Eng. 


Gray, 


Audubon. 


Eng. 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


. G&DS 


Ames, 


Story. 


& D. S. 


Fostona, 


Clay. 


Eng. 


, Coon Rapids, 


Carroll. 


Sci. 


Gravity, 


Taylor. 


& D. S. 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Sci. 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Eng. 


, Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Eng. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Eng. 


, Buckingham, 


Tama. 


Eng. 


, Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Eng. 


, Toledo, 


Tama. 


Eng. 


, Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Eng. 


, Stacyville, 


Mitchell. 


Sci. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Sp., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


& D. S. 


, Roland, 


Story. 


Eng. 


, Blairstown, 


Benton. 


Sci., 


LeGrande, 


Marshall. 


Eng., 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ag. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Blairstown, 


Benton. 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


Casey, 


Guthrie. 


Eng. 


, Camanche, 


Clinton. 



20 



306 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Holmes, J D., 
Holt, Elmer, 
Hook, Frank L., 
Hook, W. A., 
Hoover, Bertha, 
Houghland, H W., 
Howard, W. P., 
Howe, Fred S., 
Hugg, John, 
Hunter, Daisy, 
Hutchison, Rose, G. & 
Irvine, Jere, 
Jackson, Grant, 
Johnson, Arthur, 
Johnson, A. H., 
Johnson, Ray, 
Jones, Marion F., 
Jones, Ralph, 
Jordan, James C, 
Joy, Edith K., G. & 

Kelloway, Piatt, 
Kent, Wm. M., 
Kimball, Roscoe P., 
*Kimberly, P. L., 
Kirby, Edna, 
Kirkpatrick, Wade, 
Klise, Chester A., 
Knepper, Chas., 
Koch, Alma, G & 

Krueger, L F., 
Lane, L. L., 
Leib, Ray, 
Lewis, Louise, 
Long, Geo., 
Long, John, 
Ludwig, T. 0. M., 
Lyder, L. C., 
Lynch, I. V., 
Madson Anna, 
Madson, Emma, 
Martin, Grace, 
Martin, Roy, 
Marts, C. C., 
Marvick, Millie, G. & 
Mather, Milo, 
Mauk, H. E, 
McBurney, W. S., 
McCline, R. O., 
McFarland, Clyde E., 
McGlosham, T F., 
McGrath, Viola M., 



Eng. 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 


Eng. 


Weldon, 


Decatur. 


Eng. 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Eng. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


, Radcliffe, 


Hardin. 


Eng. 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


D. S. 


What Cheer, 


Keokuk. 


Sci. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Eng. 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Eng. 


Str^tfor? 


Hamilton. 


Eng. 


, Council Bluil's, 


Pottawattamie 


Eng. 


, Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Eng. 


, Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Eng. 


, Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Eng. 


, Adel, 


Dallas. 


D S. 


, Anita, 


Cass. 


Eng. 


, Adair, 


Adair. 


Eng. 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Sp. 


, La Moille, 


Marshall. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


, Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Eng. 


, Clarinda, 


Page. 


Eng. 


Sheldon, 


O'Brien. 


D. S. 


Keystone, 


Benton. 


Sci. 


Garnavillo, 


Clayton. 


Sci. 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Eng. 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Sci. 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Sci. 


Luther, 


Boone. 


Eng. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci. 


Modale, 


Harrison. 


Eng. 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Eng. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


D. S. 


Story City, 


Story. 


Eng. 


Clarksville, 


Butler. 


Eng. 


Lucas, 


Lucas. 


Eng. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng. 


Schaller, 


Sac. 


Eng. 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Eng. 


Oto, 


Woodbury. 


Sp. 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



307 



McKay, Bruce, 
McKay, G. H.. 
McLean, Donald, 
Meacham, Clare, 
Meighen, A. E., 
Menneke. Frank, 
Miller, Fred, 
Miller, Margaret, 
Morgan, C. K., 
Morton, Earle, 
Mullan, D G., 
Murray, Buford, 
Nash, J. A., 
Naylor, Nellie, 
Near, D H.. 
Neely, John B., 
Nutty, Addie, 
Olsan, Lydia, 
Olson, Oscar, 
Packer, Elwood E., 
Paige, Constant, 
Parsons, Daisy, G. 
Parsons, Frank, 
Parsons, Robert A., 
Peterson, Arthur, 
Peterson, A. H., 
Pitcher, Marion, G. 
Potter, Fred G., 
Potter, Lena, 
Ramey, Harlan W., 

Redman, Jessie, 
Reece, Floyd, 
Richie, Riley W., 
Ritner, Arthur T., 
Roberston, J. D., 
Robinson, A. I., 
Robinson, B C., 
Ross, J. V, 
Sanders, Gordon, 
Schnare, F. W., 
Scott, Floyd, 
Schlegel, Ella, 
Schlegel, Mary, 
Sharp, Milford, 
Simpson, H. H., 
Slack, Glen H., 
Smith, Geo., 
Stanard, C. D., 
Stanton, Edgar W., 
Stebbins, A. W., 
Stephan.John, 



Sp., 


Ames, 


Stpry. 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Sci., 


Clay, 


Washington. 


Eng., 


Newell, 


Buena Vista. 


Eng., 


Preston, 


Jackson. 


Eng., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Sp., 


Jordan, 


Boone. 


Eng., 


Goodhue, 


Minnesota. 


Eng., 


Shelby, 


Shelby. 


Sci., 


Pomeroy, 


Calhoun. 


Eng., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Eng., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Eng., 


Wayne, 


Nebraska. 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Linn Grove, 


Buena Vista. 


Ag., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Sci., 


Laurens, 


Pocahontas. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Col. Junction, 


Louisa. 


Eng., 


Rock Rapids, 


Lyon. 


Eng., 


Leavenworth, 


Kansas. 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


& D. S., 


Aurelia, 


Cherokee. 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sp., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Eng., 


Bayard, 


Guthrie. 


Eng., 


Allerton, 


Wayne. 


Eng., 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 


Eng., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Eng., 


Stockton, 


Muscatine. 


Eng., 


Conway, 


Taylor. 


Eng., 


LaKe City, 


Calhoun. 


Eng., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie 


Sci., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Sci., 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Sci., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Sci., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Eng., 


Dow City, 


Crawford. 


Ag., 


Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Eng., 


Spirit Lake, 


Dickinson. 


Eng., 


Berlin, 


Tama. 


Eng., 


North English, 


Iowa. 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Ag., 


Early, 


Sac. 



308 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Stephens, L. JVL, 
Sticken, H. J., 
Stratton, Frank, 
Symonds, Fred W., 
Thompson, Lee, 
Thul, W. M„ 
Tiara, Frank, 
Tinsley, Grace, 
Titus, D. B., 
Tow, Ed., 
Troup, James, 
Twigg, Geo. F., 
Urick, Joseph, 
Vandermast, Besse, 
VanVliete, Blaine, 
Vincent, Merlin S., 
Walton, Chas., 

Watt, Arthur M., 

Watts, Ruth, 

Way, Lynn, 

Wesenberg, Oscar E., 

Wettstein, Adolph, 

Weyand, H. A., 

Wharton, Maizie, 

White, J. Arthur, 

Whitehead, D. V., 

Williams, Dwight C, 

Williams, Paul 

Wills, John R., 

Wilson, C. S., 

Wilson, C. M., 

Wilson, M L., 

Wilson, Ross, 

Winslow, Warren W., 

Woehler, John W., 

Young, H. O., 

Zimmerman, Phoebe, 



NAME. 

Anderson, Gurine, 
Bevington, Edna, 
Boyd, Grace, 
Burlington, Grace, 
Cairns, Edith, 
Cole, Agnes, 
Coleman, Charlotte, 
Doggett, John, 
Halley, Bernice, 
Hansen, Helen, 



E. E., 


Irwin, 


Shelby. 


Eng., 


Bridgewater, 


Adair. 


Eng., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Eng., 


Dewey, 


Cass. 


Sci., 


Tingley, 


Ringgold. 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Conrad, 


Grundy. 


Eng., 


Norway, 


Benton. 


Eng., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Sci., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Sci., 


Duncan, 


Hancock. 


Sp., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Eng., 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 


Eng., 


Paton, 


Greene. 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sci., 


Preston, 


Jackson. 


Sci., 


Carson, 


Pottawattamie 


Eng,. 


Goodell, 


Hancock. 


Eng., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Eng., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Sci., 


Delta, 


Keokuk. 


Eng., 


Rockwell City, 


Calhoun, 


Eng., 


Pipestone, 


Minnesota. 


Eng., 


Defiance, 


Shelby. 


Eng., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Eng., 


Malvern, 


Mills. 


Eng., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ag., 


Almont, 


Clinton. 


Ag., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Colo, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Belle Plaine, 


Benton. 


Eng., 


Zearing, 


Story. 


Eng., 


Meservy, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Sci., 


Ames, 


Story. 


USIC 


STUDENTS. 






TOWN. 


COUNTY. 




Story City, 


Story. 




Ames, 


Story. 




Story City, 


Story. 




Creiston, 


Union. 




Ames, 


Story. 




Ames, 


Story. 




Jewell Junction, 


Hamilton. 




Ames, 


Story. 




Nevada, 


Story. 




Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 



STUDENTS OF THE COI I EGE 



309 



Hansen, William, 
Heglen, Grace, 
Lofstedt, Bertha, 
Marsh, Emma, 
Marsh, Julia, 
Marshall, Carydell, 
Marvick, Millie, 
Packard, Grace, 
Sumner, Esta, 
Turner, Myrtle, 
White, Fanny, 



NAME. 

Acheson, R. C, 
Back, James, 
Backer, Lewis, 
Brockway,.J. H., 
Brodsky, F. J., 
Brooks, A. J., 
Carr, C, 
Clark, W. G., 
Clausen, S. J., 
Clausen, H., 
Cochrane, A., 
Collgler, James, 
Creswell, J. C, 
Crosgrove, Dick, 
Davis, E. N., 
Davis, J. H., 
Day. T JR., 
Diederick, Frank J., 
Douglas, John O., 
Druecker, August, 
Dreucker, John, 
Edwards, L. S., 
Farnham, J. C, 
Fjetland, G. N., 
Flagel, L. H., 
Flickinger, L. L., 
Frank, W. C, 
Frandson, A. N., 
Gammil, C. E., 
Gearhart, S. E., 
Gleu, Oliver, 
Goin, M., 
Green, John M., 
Hall, J. H., 
Hansen, Hans, 
Helsagon, W. M., 



Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Slater. 


Story. 


Rippey, 


Greene. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Story City, 


Story. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Ames, 

i IDV 


Story. 


UK Y. 

TOWX. 


COUNTY. 


Maxwell, 


Story. 


Afton, 


Wisconsin. 


Le Mars, 


Plymouth. 


Michel, 


South Dakota. 


Plover, 


Iowa. 


Lisbon, 


Linn. 


Fredericka, 


Bremer. 


Preston, 


Jackson. 


Randall, 


Hamilton. 


Randall, 


Hamilton. 


Stuart, 


Guthrie. 


Toronto, 


Clinton. 


Wapello, 


Louisa. 


Sibley, 


Osceola. 


Bloomfield, 


Davis. 


Bloomfield, 


Davis. 


Roseberg, 


Oregon. 


Granville, 


Sioux. 


Villisca, 


Montgomery. 


Conroy, 


Iowa. 


Conroy, 


Iowa. 


Moulton, 


Appanoose. 


Rockford, 


Floyd. 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Osterdoch, 


Clayton. 


Elwell, 


Story. 


Terril, 


Dickinson. 


Doon, 


Lyon. 


Suberry, 


Ohio. 


Goose Lake, 


Clinton. 


Cottage Hill, 


Dubuque. 


Beattie, 


Kansas. 


Nampa, 


Idaho. 


Piattsmouth, 


Nebraska. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Seneca, 


Kossuth. 



310 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Henricksen, J. M., 
Herring, E G., 
Holecek, Anthony, 
Hoopman, Fred, 
Hummel, Geo. P., 
Jackman, J. R., 
Jenson, Martin, 
Johnson, Albert, 
Jones, J. E., 
Klopp, L. C, 
Lange, Ernest, 
Larson, Frank L., 
Lee, S. E., 
Lewes, John E., 
McCune, E. T., 
McCuen, David E., 
McGeehon, Ed, 
McGranaham, W. H., 
McKibben, Walter, 
McNeil, George, 
Menzies, G. A., 
Mansfield, Clark, 
March, G. L., 
Mead, F. K., 
Meier, Wm, 
Metzger, John, 
Nelson, Chris E., 
Niellson, J. C, 
Nordmark, A., 
Odell, F. L., 
Oleson, Christ, 
Olson, Adolph, 
Peterson, C W, 
Reid, R A., 
Reinbe, F. S., 
Rivara, Pedro L., 
Rogers, F., 
Rundall, W. E., 
Sasseen, Howard, 
Schaeffer, W. J., 
Schield, John, 
Senter, J. L., 
Sliter, G. E., 
Soles, B. T., 
Sorenson, M L., 
Stubbs, W. F., 
Taylor, Fred C, 
Tiernan, Albert, 
Cobler, A., 
Vogel, J. E., 
Weese, Randolph, 



Elkhorn, 

Dexter, 

Hayfield, 

Chester, 

Dike, 

Fontanelle, 

Carpenter, 

Tripoli, 

Larrabee, 

Bedford, 

Preston, 

Dows, 

Rembrandt, 

Stuart, 

Rippey, 

Savannah, 

Atlantic, 

Norway, 

Stuart, 

Ames, 

Wilton Junction 

Topeka, 
Finohford, 

Ionia, 

Crain Creek, 

West Salem, 

Exira, 

Elkhorn, 

Inwood, 

Greenfield, 

Sioux City, 

Spirit Lake, 

Storten, 

Hancock, 

Montour, 

Buenes Ayres, 

Arbor Hill, 

Cedar Rapids, 

Veo, 

Schaller, 

Little Falls, 

Ottawa, 

Stetten, 

Fern, 

Pleasant Plain, 

Winfield, 

Riverston, 

Loyal, 

Knoxville, 

Stromsberg, 

Prairie Rose, 



Shelby. 

Dallas. 

Hancock. 

Howard. 

Grundy. 

Adair. 

Mitchell. 

Bremer. 

Cherokee. 

Taylor. 

Jackson. 

Wright. 

Guthrie. 

Green. 

Georgia. 

Cass. 

Benton. 

Guthrie. 

Story. 

Muscatine. 

Kansas. 

Blackhawk. 

Chickasaw. 

Blackhawk. 

Illinois. 

Audubon. 

Shelby. 

Lyon. 

Adair. 

Woodbury. 

Dickinson. 

Minnesota. 

Wisconsin. 

Tama. 

So. America. 

Adair. 

Linn. 

Jefferson. 

Sac. 

Wisconsin. 

Kansas. 

Wisconsin. 

Grundy. 

Jefferson. 

Kansas. 

Nebraska. 

Minnesota. 

Tennessee. 

Nebraska. 

Shelby. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



311 



Wendt, H. D., 
Whitney, A. M., 
Widner, J H, 
Wright, F. E., 
Zbornik, L. L., 



Fairmont, 

Alden, 

Corning, 

Chariton, 

Fayette, 



Minnesota. 

Hardin. 

Adams. 

Lucas. 

Fayette. 



ENROLLMENT FOR SPECIAL COURSES IN STOCK AND 
GRAIN JUDGING, JANUARY, 1903. 



XAME. 



TOWN. 



STATE. 



Jackson, Roy, 


Trenton, 


Missouri. 


Jackson, Tom, 


Trenton, 


Missouri. 


Smith, Dwight A., 


Sentinel, 


Ohio. 


Dean, Harry G., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Green, Allen, 


Castalia, 


Iowa. 


Campbell, J. W., 


Castalia, 


Iowa. 


Lillibridge, Chas. D., 


Mason City, 


Iowa. 


Lillibridge, R. L., 


Mason City, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, Waldo S., 


Storm Lake, 


Iowa. 


Hanson, Will, 


In wood, 


Iowa. 


Raup, Harry R., 


Springfield, 


Ohio. 


Gabriel, Thos. J., 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Rexroth, John, 


Wilton Junct'n, 


Iowa. 


Waiters, Wm., 


Bruce, 


South Dakota. 


Chandler, Fred M., 


Kellerton, 


Iowa. 


Nienaber, Ed. C, 


Durant, 


Iowa. 


Peterson, Aaron E., 


Lanyon, 


Iowa. 


Paul, Chas., 


Fort Dodge, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, C. G., 


Eldora, 


Iowa. 


Lynk, Chas., 


Eldora, 


Iowa. 


Thomas, Edwin, 


Eldora, 


Iowa. 


Varley, Tom J., 


Stuart, 


Iowa. 


Harvey, Alonzo, 


Ossian, 


Iowa. 


Brinton, Burr, 


Stuart, 


Iowa. 


Andrews, B. C., 


Ollie, 


Iowa. 


Armstrong, W. N., 


Orient, 


Iowa. 


Callahan, J. F., 


Sac City, 


Iowa. 


Lewellen, M. E., 


Prescott, 


Iowa. 


Martin, W. G., 


Crawfordsville, 


Iowa. 


Swatzendruver, C. A., 


Grand Junction, 


Iowa. 


Lofstedt, C. E., 


Rippey. 


Iowa. 


Firmin, A. F., 1613 Clinton Ave., Minneapolis, 


Minnesota. 


Schrader, Udo, 479 Lamel 


ave.St. Paul, 


Minnesota. 


Stubben, 0. M., 


Alcester, 


South Dakota 


Asbjeld, Marenus, 


Alcester, 


South Dakota, 


Lerseth, John, 


Beresford, 


South Dakota. 


Weeks, Ed. C, 


Eldon, 


Missouri. 


Dry, D. W., 


Seward, 


Illinois. 


Guernsey, S. C, 


Confidence, 


Iowa. 


Lepley, Oscar, 


Union, 


Iowa. 


Rowen, S. R., 


Union, 


Iowa. 



312 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Smith, E. N., 
Neal, B. H., 
Neal, B. C, 
Pascal, D. L., 
Youngdale, A. F., 
Youngdale, Geo. E., 
Balumon, T. J., 
Hutcheson, L. C, 
Fogg, W. E., 
Lindmark, A. A., 
Simonds, Wm., 
Collver, Wm., 
Lepley, Irvin, 
Taff, Paul C, 
Rinehart, W. S., 
Finley, Jas. F., 
Clauson, Henry W., 
Naylor, Harry A., 
Smith, Leroy, 
Archenbrenner, Geo. G., 
Bollman, Talcott, 
Lathrop, N. B., 
Chandler, G. G., 
Neish, Theohomis, 
Stitt, D. D., 
Gaylord, N. B., 
Murphy, John L., 
Keller, Harry W., 
Johnson, Guy G., 
McLain, W. D., 
Edmunds, James, 
Jones, Orval A., 
Bailey, Charley E., 
Blake, C. W., 
Wolfe, Henry, 
Smith, Ray, 
Robinson, Herbert, 
Cartwright, Don, 
Martin, J. H., 
Staley, Jos. P., 
McShane, Fred, 
Bailey, F. M., 
Wild, Edd., 
Bedell, Wm. P., 
Parker, H. H., 
Coon, W. A., 
Illion, A. L., 
Schmidt, A. W., 
Wilson, M. L., 
Templeton, E. G., 
Lebeck, T. L., 



De Witt, 


Iowa. 


Mt. Vernon, 


Iowa. 


Mt. Vernon, 


Iowa. 


De Witt, 


Iowa. 


Harcourt, 


Iowa. 


Harcourt, 


Iowa. 


Marble Rock, 


Iowa. 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


West Liberty, 


Iowa. 


Stratford, 


Iowa. 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


Chariton, 


Iowa. 


Beaman, 


Iowa. 


Panora, 


Iowa. 


Alden, 


Iowa. 


Algona, 


Iowa. 


Clear Lake, 


Iowa. 


Clear Lake, 


Iowa. 


Elkader, 


Iowa. 


Laurens, 


Iowa. 


Castalia, 


Iowa. 


Oxford Junct'n, 


Iowa. 


Fairfield, 


Iowa. 


Carlyle, 


Assa. Canada 


Clarinda, 


Iowa. 


Arthur, 


Iowa. 


Reinbeck, 


Iowa. 


Gowrie, 


Iowa. 


Callender, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Lenox, 


Iowa. 


Villisca, 


Iowa. 


Atlantic, 


Iowa. 


Ackley, 


Iowa. 


Aurora, 


Iowa. 


Aurora, 


Iowa. 


Kelley, 


Iowa. 


Luther, 


Iowa. 


Union Grove, 


Iowa. 


Sidney, 


Ohio. 


Springville, 


Iowa. 


Springville, 


Iowa. 


Springville, 


Iowa. 


Whittier, 


Iowa. 


Sycamore, 


Illinois. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Davenport, 


Iowa. 


Davenport, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Walnut 


Iowa. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



313 



Sullivan, R. J., 


Des Moir»os, 


Iowa. 


Winegar, Roy E., 


Westgate, 


Iowa. 


Larson, J. S., 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


Sidwell, C. I., 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


Witmer, Forest B., 


Wilton Junct'n, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, Charley 0., 


Sheldahl, 


Iowa. 


Terrazas, W. F., 


Chihauhau, 


Mexico. 


Torres, Gonzalo, Leon, 


Guanajuata, 


Mexico. 


Smith, La Vern B., 


Corning, , 


Iowa. 


Cadwell, Homer C, 


Logan, 


Iowa. 


Leidigh, Arthur H., 


Hutchinson, 


Kansas. 


Bowman, M. L., 


Corning, 


Iowa. 


Drennan, R. E., 


Corning, 


Iowa. 


Schaeffer, L. L., 


Eagle Grove, 


Iowa. 


McVicker, Claude D., 


Eagle Grove, 


Iowa. 


Frybarger, Jas. T., 


Eagle Grove, 


Iowa. 


Frybarger, Boyd, 


Eagle Grove, 


Iowa. 


Weedman, Seth, 


Woodstock, 


Iowa. 


Brown, H. E., 


Sergeant's Bl'ff, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, A. A., 


Gladbrook, 


Iowa. 


Pashby, George C, 


Cedar Falls, 


Iowa. 


Feist, Frank L., 


Cedar Falls, 


Iowa. 


Swingle, Fred, 


Walnut, 


Iowa. 


Glenn, A., 155 La Salle St., 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Wenner, C. 0., 


Vinton, 


Iowa. 


Stiefel, Henry, 


Reinbeck, 


Iowa. 


Lundvall, M. J., 


Boxholm, 


Iowa. 


Lundblad, Leonard, 


Pilot Mound, 


Iowa. 


Rink, J. J., 


Shelby, 


Iowa. 


Semmart, Edw., R. 1, 


Dubuque, 


Iowa. 


Peters, Orlin B., 


Aurelia, 


Iowa. 


Hofmann, R. C, 


Ottumwa, 


Iowa. 


Smith, A. F., 


Castalia, 


Iowa. 


Hurless, Leon, 


Sutherland, 


Iowa. 


White, Geo. T., 


Dallas Center, 


Iowa. 


Taylor, J. A., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Williams, Hurley, 


Milford, 


Iowa. 


Bair, P. A., 1122 6th Ave., 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Cook, A. B., 


Fremont, 


Iowa. 


Hauser, M. A., 


Liscomb, 


Iowa. 


Veatch, E. C, 


Liscomb, 


Iowa. 


Wamstad, Henry, 


Nora Springs, 


Iowa. 


Wamstad, Brede, 


Osage, 


Iowa. 


Corbit, Wm. J., 


Onslow, 


Iowa. 


Crossley, B. W., R. No. 3, 


Council Bluffs, 


Iowa. 


Alspach, George, 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Forest, Geo. S., 


Miles, 


Iowa. 


Dreher, C. R., 


Scranton, 


Iowa. 


Hardwick, George P., 


Britt, 


Iowa. 


Randall, Frank W., 


Dallas Center, 


Iowa. 


Brouhard, Eddie J., 


Colo, 


Iowa. 



314 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Folvag, Peter J., 


Badger, 


Iowa. 


Meland, John, 


Badger, 


Iowa. 


Hopkins, P. F., 


Colo, 


Iowa. 


Hocum, P. 0., 


Gowrie, 


Iowa. 


Hansen, Magnus, 


Goldfield, 


Iowa. 


Rail, Ellis, 


Birmingham, 


Iowa. 


Nelson, Anton, 


Goldfield, 


Iowa. 


Doty, L. J., 


Goldfield, 


Iowa. 


Ford, Chas. H., 


Mt. Vernon, 


Iowa. 


Gleason, Guy S., 


Mechanicsville, 


Iowa. 


Avery, A. M., 


Mason City, 


Iowa. 


Greene, Ralph, 


Mason City, 


Iowa. 


Greene, Merritt, Jr., 


Marshalltown, 


Iowa. 


Donald, Peter, 


Arcadia, 


Wisconsin, 


Leise, Henry, 


Liscomb, 


Iowa. 


Reidel, Geo. F., 


Albion, 


Iowa. 


Bender, Francis, 


Carlisle, 


Iowa. 


Murphy, Bower, 


Murphy, 


Iowa. 


Coggshall, C. A., 


Cambridge, 


Iowa. 


Titus, E. A., 


Lytton, 


Iowa. 


Charles, Geo., 


Prairie City, 


Iowa. 


Lindberg, Wm., 


Kirona, 


Iowa. 


Gronau, C. H., 


Kirona, 


Iowa. 


Cary, J. W., 


Hastings, 


Iowa. 


Stewart, Herbert A., 


Cherokee, 


Iowa. 


Arnold, John E., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Butler, Edward G., 


Briggs, 


Virginia. 


Johnston, H. J., 


Storm Lake, 


Iowa. 


Michener, Z. G., 


Cumming, 


Iowa. 


Judd, Andrew S., 


Jefferson, 


Iowa. 


Yocum, Frank, 


Logan, 


Iowa. 


Beebe, Fred F., 


" Beebetown, 


Iowa. 


Carter, J. W., 


Garden Grove, 


Iowa. 


Eveland, James T., 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Hundley, E. E., 


Fonda, 


Iowa. 


Baskerville, Oscar A., 




Iowa. 


Hester, Norris, 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Rowe, Edmund, 


Grand Junction, 


Iowa. 


Aikens, Wm., 


Grand Junction, 


Iowa. 


Watt, Arthur C, 


Newton, 


Iowa. 


Campbell, J. E., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Tiedje, John, 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Bliss, J. A., 




Iowa. 


Lanphear, N. W., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Akin, John H., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Robbins, Wm. H., 


Springfield, 


Ohio. 


Frevert, G. E., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Frevert, Edw. F., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Frevert, F. A., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Kluckholm, 0. A., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Kinne, Geo.,' 


Emmetsburg, 


Iowa. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



315 



Else, J. J., 


Oskaloosa, 


Iowa. 


Finley, C. W., 


Oskaloosa, 


Iowa. 


Maxwell, J. M., 


Crawfordsville, 


Iowa. 


Davis, Walter A., 


Galva, 


Iowa. 


Roe, C. C, 


Oskaloosa, 


Iowa. 


Eastburn, J. 0., 


Ottumwa, 


Iowa. 


McCulloch, Fred, 


Hartwick, 


Iowa. 


Jenks, C. M., 


Blockton, 


Iowa. 


Hakeman, E. G., 


Hartwick, 


Iowa. 


Hirst, W. C., 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


Down, T. W., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Safley, H. A., 


Lohrville, 


Iowa. 


Caldwell, C. C, 


White Oak, 


Iowa. 


Albaugh, Park, 


Lisbon, 


Iowa. 


Johnston, Charlie, 


Lisbon, 


Iowa. 


Parr, Geo. H., 


Argenta, 


Illinois. 


Chestek, Lee J., 


B as sett, 


Iowa. 


Clifton, A. N., 


Havelock, 


Iowa. 


Murray, J. J., 


Epworth, 


Iowa. 


Monahan, Chas., 


Stuart, 


Iowa. 


Bell, Tom S., 


Hancock, 


Iowa. 


Cochran, W. J., 


Wright, 


Iowa. 


Paul, Robbie, 


Gilman, 


Iowa. 


Gross, Geo. A., 


Avoca, 


Iowa. 


Young, H. M., R. No. 7, 


Iowa City, 


Iowa. 


Harken, Fred, 


Castle Grove, 


Iowa. 


Steen, George, 


West Liberty, 


Iowa. 


Hanson, R. W., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Short, D. I., 


Sutherland, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, Edwin, 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Chapman, Grant, 


Bagley, 


Iowa. 


Felter, V., 


Washta, 


Iowa. 


Pixler, H. A., 


Cherokee, 


Iowa. 


Mathew, Samuel, 


Morrison, 


Illinois, 


Preston, J. A., 


Battle Creek, 


Iowa. 


Preston, H. H., 


Battle Creek, 


Iowa. 


Bodholdt, Hans C, 


Newell, 


Iowa. 


Pedersen, Ole, 


Newell, 


Iowa. 


Schneider, Chas. J., 


Grand View, 


Iowa. 


Lieberknecht, Herbert, 


Col. Junction, 


Iowa. 


Kerkeberg, C. J., 


Eagle Grove, 


Iowa. 


Tierney, F. J., 


Goose Lake, 


Iowa. 


Wray, J. G., 


Iowa City, 


Iowa. 


Corey, F. A., 


Wesley, 


Iowa. 


N. Hong, 


Ute, 


Iowa. 


Meyers, Grant, 


Iowa City, 


Iowa. 


McClean, C. Ross, 


Union, 


Iowa. 


Hauser, Lloyd, 


Whitten, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, Ernest, 


Mt. Etna, 


Iowa. 


Plummer, A. L., 


Altoona, 


Iowa. 


Gray, Vincent V., 


Adel, 


Iowa. 



316 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Ebert, Henry, 


Red Oak, 


Iowa. 


Klopping, F. H., 


Weston, 


Iowa. 


Greve, C. W., 


Lyons, 


Iowa. 


Merritt, Ira A., 


Kellerton, 


Iowa. 


Hemingway, F. L., 


Vernon Center, 


Minnesota. 


Danforth, Frank D., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Thompson, Dague, 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Talbot, Dr. H. E., 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Norton, Clyde, 


Whiting, 


Iowa. 


McBeath, N. W., 


Whiting, 


Iowa. 


Barlow, W. L., 


Clear Lake, 


Iowa. 


Freeman, J. H., 


Hazleton, 


Iowa. 


Hethershaw, Fred, R. No. 3, 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Morgan, R. E., 


Grinnell, 


Iowa. 


Kubic, Jerry, 


Jay, 


Iowa. 


Nims, D. B., 


Emerson, 


Iowa. 


Sanders, J. F., 


Rudd, 


Iowa. 


Baldwin, A. F., 1515 Center St 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Prosser, W. G., 


Le Roy, 


Minnesota 


Malcomson, M. M., 


Le Roy, 


Minnesota, 


Robison, E. R., 


Maxwell, 


Iowa. 


Forman, W., 


West Branch, 


Iowa. 


Shoroyer, A. C, 


Granger, 


Iowa. 


Taylor, 0. P., 


Van Horn, 


Iowa. 


McNeal, Geo. W., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Thamer, Henry, 


Eldora, 


Iowa. 


Kurtz, Samuel E., 


Odebolt 


Iowa. 


Randall, Harry L., 


Dallas Center, 


Iowa. 


Scott, A. R., 


Sioux Rapids, 


Iowa. 


Giese, A. T., 


Vinton, 


Iowa. 


Atkinson, W., 


Clear Lake, 


Iowa. 


Vader, Geo. M., 


Churdan, 


Iowa. 


Sanders, W. S., 


Grinnell, 


Iowa. 


Hooper, Robt. C, 


Trenton, 


Missouri. 


Van Duzer, W. H., 


Ontario, 


Iowa. 


Chizum, Joe M., 


Morocco, 


Indiana. 


Chizum, J. B., 358 Dearborn 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Morrow, Frank, 


Buckingham, 


Iowa. 


Swain, Irwin, 


Tingley, 


Iowa. 


Nechtmann, John, 


Earlville, 


Iowa. 


Seward, I. E., 


New Provid'ce, 


Iowa. 


Beach, J. M., 


New Provid'ce, 


Iowa. 


Cummings, C. S., 


Gladbrook, 


Iowa. 


Cook, W. C, 


New Provid'ce, 


Iowa. 


Keenan, G. A., 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Stuntz, E. S., 


State Center, 


Iowa. 


Bedwell, Earl V., 


Col. Junction, 


Iowa. 


Smith, 0. 0., 301 Youngerman Bldg, Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Richardson, C. R., 


Elwell, 


Iowa. 


Jory, 0. N., 


Maxwell, 


Iowa. 


Tweed, R. G., 


Le Grand, 


Iowa. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



317 



Turner, Asa, 


Maxwell, 


Iowa. 


Casey, J. E., 


Corning, 


Iowa. 


Teander, E. N., 


Stratford, 


Iowa. 


Holstrum, V. A., 


Stanhope, 


Iowa. 


Lundquist, C. G., 


Stratford, 


Iowa. 


Buchanan, B. N., R. F. D. 4, Marshalltown, 


Iowa. 


Schward. Robert, 


Eldora, 


Iowa. 


Colvin, W. E., 


Arthur, 


Iowa. 


Janse, John, 


Ft. Madison, 


Iowa. 


Rowland, C. C, 


Hartwick, 


Iowa. 


Test, E. D., 


New Provid'ce, 


Iowa. 


Richards. W. T., 


Clarion, 


Iowa. 


Coskens, R., 


Des Moines, 


Iowa. 


Swedlund, C. E., 


Stratford, 


Iowa. 


Brinton, Floyd N., 


Stuart, 


Iowa. 


Mason, Irving F., 


Elgin, 


Iowa. 


Hanson, E. J., 


Exira, 


Iowa. 


Kelly, Geo. 0., 


Newton, 


Iowa. 


Miller, John, 


Metz, 


Iowa. 


Alvin, Melville C, 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Kirk, E. A., 


Elwell, 


Iowa. 


Bogart, E. S., 


Glenwood, 


Iowa. 


Halstead, C. W., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Buffington, Frank, 


Glenwood, 


Iowa. 


Buffington, C. R., 


Glenwood, 


Iowa. 


Treanor, E. J., 


Ogden, 


Iowa. 


Sundell, A. T., 


Bonholm, 


Iowa. 


Browning, 0. W., 


Newton, 


Iowa. 


Moeller, Wm., 


Dixon, 


Iowa. 


Farrum, Clinton, 


Hillsboro, 


Iowa. 


Marsh, J. B., 


Lehigh, 


Iowa. 


Chester, T. P., 


Champaign, 


Illinois 


Smith, H. B., 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


McBurney, H. G., 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Anstey, John, 


Massena, 


Iowa. 


Lehman, S., 


Slater, 


Iowa. 


Soma, H. J., 


Gilbert Station, 


Iowa. 


Orning, P., 


Story City, 


Iowa. 


Smith, C. H., 


Glenmont, 


Ohio. 


Winslow, W. J., 


St. Anthony, 


Iowa. 


Branson, W. J., 


Laurens, 


Iowa. 


Warburton, W. H., 


Independence, 


Iowa. 


Reimer, Albert, 


Wilton, 


Iowa. 


YVilham, Joseph, 


Hubbard, 


Iowa. 


Johnson, W. E., 


Athens, 


Illinois, 


Lister, John, 


Conrad, 


Iowa. 


Carlson, J., 


Ogden, 


Iowa. 


Young, Clark 0., 


Traer, 


Iowa. 


Steigerwalt, W. F., 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES. 



320 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



ALUMNI OF THE IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND THE MECHANIC ARTS. 



GRADUATES OF 1872. 



LaFayette, 



Indiana. 



Iowa. 



Omaha, Nebraska. 

Masilla Park, Las Cruces, N. M. 



J. C. Arthur, B. Sc, D. Sc, 

*P. S. Brown, B. Sc. 

O. H. Cessna, B. Sc, A. M., D. D., Ames, 

*S. A. Churchill, B. Sc. 

*S. H. Dickey, B. Sc. 

Chas. N. Dietz, B. Sc, 

Luther Foster, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

*H. Fuller, B. Sc. 

*F. L. Harvey, B. Sc, M. Sc 

*E. M. Hungerford, B. Sc. 

Mattie (Locke) Macomber, B. Sc, 3020 Kingman Ave., 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
J. K. Macomber, B. Sc, 510 Youngerman Block, Des Moines, Iowa. 
L. W. Noyes, B. Sc, 234 Lincoln Park Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 

H. L. Page, B. Sc, 810 17th St., Sioux City, Iowa. 

G. W. Ramsey, B. Sc, Masonville, Iowa. 

*Fannie (Richards) Stanley, B. Sc. 
*C. A. Smith, B. Sc. 



*I. W. Smith, B. Sc. 

H. C. Spencer, B. Sc, 

E. W. Stanton, B. Sc, M. Sc, 

J. L. Stevens, B. Sc, 

C. L. Suksdorf, B. Sc, 

*T. L. Thompson, B. Sc 

C. H. Tillotson, B. Sc, 

*C. P. Wellman, B. Sc. 

J. M. Wells, B. Sc, 



Grinnell, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

728 Linn St., Boone, Iowa. 
1335 Franklin St., Davenport, Iowa. 



Ormund, 
Nevada, 



Nebraska. 
Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1873. 

E. L. Beard, B. Sc, Rural Route No. 5, Decorah, Iowa 

Rowena F. (Edson) Stevens, B. Sc, 728 Linn St., Boone, Iowa. 

*G. R. Flower, B. Sc 

W. Green, B. Sc, Horticultural Dep. Capital Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa. 

*G. W. Harvey, B. Sc. 

A. M. Hawkins, B. Sc, 661 Yesler Way, Seattle, Wash. 

D. A. Kent, B. Sc, 

Kate (Krater) Starr, B. Sc, 

*J. S. Lee, B. Sc, 

C. B. Maben, B. Sc. 

M. F. Marshall, B. Sc, 

Hattie E. (Raybourne) Morse, B. Sc, Littleton, 

W. O. Robinson, B. Sc, 

M. Stalker, B. Sc, V. S., M. Sc, 

Sallie (Stalker) Smith, B. Sc, 



Jewell Junction, 


Iowa. 


Algona, 


Iowa. 


Wealthwood, 
Atwood, 
:., Littleton, 
Trenton, 
Ames, 


Minnesota 

Kansas. 

Colorado. 

Nebraska. 

Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 321 



GRADUATES OK 1874. 



Estella (Beb(Ait) Morse, B. Sc, 1302 6th Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. 

C. I). Boardman, B. Sc, 1601 Arlington Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. 

C. S. Chase, B. Sc, Waterloo, Iowa. 

C. E. Clingan, B. Sc, Sioux City, Iowa. 

E. R. Clingan, B. Sc, Belt, Montana. 

*C. P. Hastings, B. Sc. 

J. G. W. Kiesel, B. Sc, 57 Highland Place, Dubuque, Iowa. 

M. C. Litteer, B. Sc, Yukon, O. T. 

O. P. McCray, B. Sc, 620 4th St., Sioux City, Iowa. 

G. E. Marsh, B. Sc, Osage, Iowa. 

Mary A. (Palmer) Snell, B. Sc, Boone, Iowa. 

A. A. Parsons, B. Sc, 326 Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Eva E. (Paull) Vanslyke, B. Sc , 1406 10th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

E. A. Pyne, B. Sc, Blairstown, Iowa. 

Ida E. (Smith) Noyes, B. Sc, 234 Lincoln Park Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

W. R. Smith, B. Sc, 1629 N. 70th Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

Kate (Tupper) Galpin, B. Sc, 515 S. Fremont Ave., 

Los Angeles, California. 
J. R. Whittaker, B. Sc, 703 Carroll St., Boone, Iowa. 

*S. Y. Yates, B. Sc. 

GRADUATES OF 1875. 

E. P. Caldwell, B. Sc, Manila, P. I. 
Milla (Cherrie) Whiting, B. Sc, Skaguay, Alaska. 
Alice (Cunningham) Culver, B. Sc, Knoxville, Iowa. 
Lizzie M. (Curtis) Foster, B. Sc, Masilla Park, Las Cruces, N. M. 
R. P. Kelley, B. Sc, Eureka, Kansas. 

C. H. Lee, B. Sc, 411 McPhee Block, Denver, Colorado. 

W. R. Lamoreaux, B. Sc, Los Angeles, California. 

Hannah (Lyman) Caldwell, B. Sc, Helena, Montana. 

F. J. Macomber, B. Sc, Lewis, Iowa. 
Celestia (Neal) Gearhart, B. Sc, 359 7th St., Astoria, Oregon. 

T. L. Palmer, B. Sc, Lake Charles. Louisiana. 

H. R. Patrick, B. Sc, Phoenix, Arizona. 

C. E. Peterson, B. Sc, Panora, Iowa. 

*Ida (Ross) Boardman, B. Sc. 

M. E. Rudolph, B. Sc, Canton, S. Dakota. 

Ida L. (Sherman) Caulkins, B. Sc, Storm Lake, Iowa. 

L. C. Thornton, B. Sc, Pocahontas, Iowa. 

J. M. Whitaker, B. Sc, Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Nancy (Wills) Roundy, B. Sc, Hawarden, Iowa. 

Lizzie M. (Wilson) Edwards, B. Sc, Waterloo, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1876. 

M. I. Aitkin, B. Sc, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

A. P. Barker, B. Sc. Clinton, Iowa. 

L. W. Beard, B. Sc, Decorah, Iowa. 

A. M. Blodgett, B. Sc, 402 New England Bldg., Kansas City, Kansas. 

*Deceased. 

21 



322 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Julia C. (Blodgett) Hainer., B. Sc, Aurora, Nebraska. 

*L. A. Claussen, B. Sc, 

J. E. Cobbey, B. Sc, 720 Grant St., Beatrice, Nebraska. 

W. S. Collins, B. Sc. Basin, Wyoming. 

Winifred (Dudley) Shaw, B. Sc, 1700 4th St., Des Moines. Iowa. 

J. J. Fegtly, B. Sc, 943 S. Main St., Kingfisher, Oklahoma Territory-. 
W. J. Gilmore, B. Sc, Tipton, Iowa. 

J. F. Hardin, B. Sc, Eldora, Iowa. 

Ellen W. (Harlow) McKinzie, B. Sc, Palouse, Washington. 

A. E. Hitchcock, B. Sc, Mitchell, S. Dakota. 

W. M. James, B. Sc, 309 Magoffin Ave., Catemaco, Vera Cruz, Mexico. 
Ellie L. (Mead) Dissmore, B. Sc, Lakota, N. Dakota. 

G. A. Gerard, B. Sc, Denver, Colorado. 

H. N. Scott, B. Sc, 604 Portland Savings Bank, Portland, Oregon. 
A. B. Shaw, B. Sc, 1700 4th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

L. E. Spencer, B. Sc, 5719 Madison Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

W. W. Woodward, B. Sc, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

GRADUATES OF 1877. 

F. W. Booth, B. Sc, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania- 

Alfaretta (Campbell) Fassett, B. Sc, 1185 Scoville Ave., 

Oak Park, Illinois. 
Mary C. (Carpenter) Hardin, B. Sc, Eldora, 
C. C. Colclo, B. Sc, 
Kate S. (Curtis) Mirick, B. Sc, 
J. W. Doxsee. B. Sc, 
Mary (Farwell) Carpenter, B. Sc 
A. P. Hargrave, B. Sc, 
W. A. Helsell, B. Sc, 
J. B. Hungerford, B. Sc, 
W. N. Hunt, B. Sc, 
*R. F. Jordan, B. Sc, 
*Cora B. (Keith) Pierce, B. Sc. 

E. L. King, B. Sc, 
G. 1. Miller, B. Sc, 
Alice (Neal) Gregg, B. Sc, 
J. C. Milnos, B. Sc, 
Cora M. (Patty) Payne, B. Sc, 
L. B. Robinson, B. Sc, 
T. L. Smith, B. Sc, 

F. L. Stratton, B. Sc, 
*H. M. White, B. Sc 

GRADUATES OF 1878. 

*Florence (Brown) Martin, B. Sc 

Richard Burke, B. Sc, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

H. L. Glenn, B. Sc, Helena, Montana. 

A. E. Griffith, B. Sc, M. Sc, Wesley Church, E Des Moines, Iowa. 

J. C. Hainer, B. Sc, M. Sc, 309 Security Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

M. M. Hitchcock, B. C. E., 412 Pullman Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

C. E. Martin, B. C. E., San Antonio, Texas. 



Eldora, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Dows, 


Iowa. 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Central City, 


Nebraska. 


Osceola, 


Nebraska 


Boone, 


Iowa. 


Traer, 


Iowa. 



2U7 Olive St., Kansas City, Mo. 
Linden, Iowa. 

Harlan, Iowa. 

134 10th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Osceola, So. Dakota. 



♦Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



323 



J. C. Meredith, B. M. E., Kansas City, 

Emma (McHenry) Glenn, B. Sc, 924 11th Ave., 



California Jc, 

Jesup, 
Am Bridge Co., 51 St 

Manchester, 
290 McGregor St., Ma 



D. McKinnon, B. Sc, 
J. N. Muncey, B. Sc, 
C. F. Mount, B. C. E., C. E, 
Ellen (Rice) Robins, B. Sc, 
W. K. Robbins, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
L. (Schepherd) Beckwith, B. Sc, Pattiway, 
Ida (Twitchell) Blockman, B. Sc, Santa Maria, 

E. G. Tyler, B. C. E., Logan, 
T. F. Lee, B. Sc, Lakeport, 
G. W, Wilson, B. C. E., Rockwell, 
J. W. Whitney, B. Sc, Prairieburg, 
Belle Woods, B. Sc, Pueblo, 

GRADUATES OF 1879. 



Missouri. 
Helena, Mont. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 
, Pittsburg, Pa. 

N. H. 
nchester, N. H. 

California. 

California. 

Iowa. 

California. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Colorado. 



Malinda (Cleaver) Faville, B. Sc, 428 Poole St., Norfolk, Virginia. 
*S. Carrie (Carter) Hanson, B. Sc 

Lillie M. (Croy) Lee, B. Sc, 118 Oak Park, Chicago, Illinois. 

George C. Faville, B. Sc, D. V. M., 428 Poole St., Norfolk, Virginia. 



F.N. Field, B.C. E. 
F. H. Friend, B. C. E., 
A. L. Hanson, B. C. E., 
T. V. Hoggatt, B. Sc, 
J. E. Hyde, B. Sc, 
L. L. Manwaring, B. Sc, 
W. G. McConnon, B. M. 



B 



Jennie (McElyea) Beyer, 
*J. C. Noble, B. Sc 
Herbert Osborne, B. Sc, M 
J. D. Shearer, B. Sc, 
Fremont Turner, B. M. E., 
W. M. Scott, B. Sc, 
J. M. Waugh, B. Sc, 



Burlington, Iowa. 

West Publishing Co., St. Paul, Minnesota. 
Ada, Minnesota. 

Valdez, Alaska. 

Fargo, N. Dakota. 

Stillwater, Minnesota. 

, Westinghouse Electric and Mfg. Co., 

East Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Sc, Ames, Iowa. 



*Genevieve (Welch) Barstow, B. 
W. Whited, B. Sc, 286 Main St. 
Alice (Whited) Burling, B. Sc, 



, Sc, 485 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 

517 First Ave. S., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

900 Sixteenth St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Kiona, Washington. 

930 Monadnock Bldg., Chicago, Illinois. 



Sc, 

Station B, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Eldora, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1880. 



S. Dakota. 
Iowa. 



M. J. Bailey, B. Sc, Custer City, 

D. D. Briggs, B. Sc, Nevada, 

*F. Boddy, B. Sc. 

O. S. Brown, B. Sc, Meservey, 

M. Hakes, B. Sc, Laurens, 

J. Hassett, B. Sc, Papillion, 

*E. D. Harvey, B. Sc 

D. S. Hardin, B. Sc, Alma, Nebraska. 

Carrie (Lane Chapman) Catt, B. Sc, Bensonhurst-by-the-Sea, 

New York, N. Y. 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Nebraska. 



''Deceased. 



324 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



*C. H. McGrew, B. Sc. 

*R. M. Nicholson, B. Sc. 

*G. E. Reed, B. Sc. 

J. L. Simcoke, B. Sc, 

C. D. Taylor, B. Sc, 

W. A. Thomas, D. V. M., 

J. Vincent, D. V. M., 

W. B. Welch, B. Sc, D. V. M., 



Adel, 

Seattle, 

Lincoln, 

Shenandoah, 

Marshall, 



Iowa. 

Washington. 
Nebraska. 
Iowa. 
Missouri. 



GRADUATES OF 1881. 



Wm. C. Armstrong. B. C. E., 
Nellie M. (Bell) McGavern, B. 
A. M. Beresford, B. Sc, 
Thomas Burke, B. Sc, 
*Marilla J. Crossman, B. Sc. 
Chas. M. Coe, B. Sc, Cor. 

F. E. Colby, B. C. E., 
J. S. Dewell, B. Sc. 
C. A. Dodge, B. C. E., 

E. C. Fortner, B. Sc, 

F. E. Furry, B. Sc, 
M. J. Furry, B. Sc, 
Julia M. Hanford, B. Sc, 



156 Lake St., Eng. Office, Chicago, 111. 
Sc, Missouri Valley, Iowa. 

Orleans, Nebraska. 

Baker City, Oregon. 

11 & Broadway, Kansas City, Missouri. 



U. S. Supply, Co., Omaha, Nebraska. 

Mo. Valley, Iowa. 

Orange City, Iowa. 

801-126 State St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Alden, Iowa. 

Alden, Iowa. 

811 S. 11th St., Tacoma, Washington. 



*J. R. Hopkins, B. Sc. 

]. S. McGavern, B. Sc, Missouri Valley, Iowa. 

W. H. McHenry. B. Sc,29& Cottage Grove Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. 

W. O. McElroy, B. C. E., Newton, Iowa. 

Fanny J. (Perett) Gault, B. Sc, 520 N. G. St., Tacoma, Washington. 

Alice I. (Sayles) Osborn, B. Sc, 485 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 

T. W. Shearer, B. Sc, Wallisville, Texas. 



GRADUATES OF 1882. 



W. D Atkinson, B. Sc, 

*J. A. Blaine, B. Sc. 

Etta M. Budd, B. Sc, 

George W. Catt, B. C. E 

Mary (Coe) Lorbeer, B. 

W. V. A. Dodds, B. Sc, 

W. M. Dudley, B. Sc, 

*H. J. Gable, B. Sc 

C. I. Lorbeer, B. Sc, 

I. B. Marsh, B. M. E., 

E. A. McDonald, B. Sc, 

J. R. McKimm, B. Sc, 

Nellie B. (Merrill) Wheeler, B. Sc 

Dolla A. Neal, B. Sc, 

J. H. Patten, B. Sc, 

Hattie A. Perrett, B. Sc, 

Lizzie Perrett, B. Sc, 

O. C. Peterson, B. Sc, 

*Kitty E. Reeve, B. Sc. 



Parsons, 



Kansas. 



Ames, Iowa. 

,, Bensonhurst-by-the-Sea, New York, N. Y. 
Sc, Holt Ave., Pomona, California. 

Beatrice, Nebraska. 

Villisca, Iowa. 

Holt Ave., Pomona, California. 
1700 Ninth St., Des Moines, Iowa. 



Tuxla, 
Pittsburg, 
1156 W. Ninth St 
Lake Charles, 
Denver, 
Rock Falls, 
Rock Falls, 
7405 Princeton Ave 



Mexico. 
Kansas. 
Des Moines, la. 
Louisiana. 
Colorado. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



*Deceased, 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



325 



C. F. Savior, B. Sc, 



Sarah (Smith) McDonald, B. Sc, 
D. T. Stockman, B. Sc„ 
W. S. Summers, B. Sc, 
W. W. Wheeler, B. Sc, 
W. U. White, B. Sc, 



1082 Twenty-First St., Des Moines, Iowa. 



City of Mexico, Mexico. 

Sigourney, Iowa. 

Omaha, Nebraska. 

1715 Ninth St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Hope, S. Dakota. 



GRADUATES OF 1883. 

A. M. Allen, B. Sc, 2116 Kenwood Blvd., Minneapolis, Minnesota 
A. G. Andrews, B. C. E., U. S. Surveyor General's Office, 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



G. M. Burnham, B. Sc, 
Bertie N. (Carson) Cleave, B. Sc 
George Caven, B. C. E., 
Jennie L. Christman, B. Sc, 
Virginia (Colclo) Quint, B. Sc, 
Geo. W. Curtis, B. S. A., M. S. A. 
*Lottie Estes, B. Sc. 
C. H. Flynn, D. V. M., 



Ashland, Wisconsin. 

Marseilles, Illinois. 

45-154 Lake St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Albany, New York. 

1715 9th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 



Dallas, 



*Jessie E. (Frater) Muncey, B. Sc, 



Postville, 



Texas. 
Iowa. 



Sibley, 
Olympia, 
Lake Charles, 
Ames, 



Iowa. 

Washington. 

Louisiana. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Nebraska. 



K. M. Hunter, B. Sc, 

Chas. H. Kegley, B. S. A., 

Minnie (Knapp) Mayo, B. Sc, 

Herman Knapp, B. S. A., 

Mary W. (McDonald) Knapp, B. Sc, Ames, 

Kate (McNeil) Wells, B. Sc, Lincoln, 

A. M. Miller, B. Sc, 1314 E. Thirteenth St., Des Moines, Iowa 

E. Mead, B. C. E., U. S. Department of Agrl., Washington, D. C 
Emily A. Reeve, B. Sc, Hartford, Conneticut. 
M. J. Riggs, B. C. E., American Bridge Co., 2301 Robinwood Ave., 

Toledo, Ohio 
S. C. Scott, B. Sc, Lyons, Iowa. 

*Effie G. Slater, B. Sc. 

F. J. Smith. B. Sc, Alton, Iowa. 

M. E. Wells, B. Sc, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

W. D. Wells, B. Sc, 1716 Park Ave., Davenport, Iowa 

Agatha M.(West) Ramsey, B. Sc, Rock Rapids, Iowa. 

Mabel A. (Young) Alexander, B. Sc, Clarion, Iowa 

GRADUATES OF 1884. 



J. F. Armstrong, B. Sc, 
Edna (Bell) Anderson, B. Sc, 
T. F. Bevington, B. Sc, 
Geo. R. Chatburn, B. C. E., 
C. J. Clark, B. C. E., 
J. E. Daugherty, B. C. E., 
*W. P. Dickey, B. Sc, 
L. M. Garrett, B. Sc, 
J. W. Gill, B. C. E. 



Faulkton, S. Dakota. 

Missouri Valley, Iowa. 

Iowa Building, Sioux City, Iowa. 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
Denver, Colorado. 

Texarkana Texas. 

703 W 7th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 



^Deceased. 



326 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



B. T. Hainer, B. Sc, 

H. H. (Hainer) Gabel, B. Sc, 
*A. E. (Henry) Quint, B. Sc. 
G. E. Hibbs, B. Sc, 
A. S. Hitchcock, B. S. A., M. Sc, 
F. A. Huntley, B. S. A., 

F. L. Lambert, B. S. A., 

W. E. D. Morrison, D. V. M., 

E. J. Nichols, B. C. E., 

G. M. Osborn, D. V. M., 

F. L. Pitman, B. C. E., 
J. F. Porter, B. C. E., 
Addie (Rice) Hainer, B. Sc, 

C. H. Sloan, B. Sc, 

G. W. Thompson, B. C. E., 
C. Vincent, B. Sc, 

M. Vincent, B. S. A., 

lone (Weatherby ) Marsh, B. Sc. 

*W. J. Wicks, B. Sc. 

W. H. Wier, B. Sc, 

Alfred Williams, B. C. E., 

Fannie R. Wilson, B. Sc, 

G. W. Wormley, B. C. E., 



Perry, 


O. T. 


Aurora, 


Nebraska. 


Mitchellville, 


Iowa. 


Washington, 


D. C. 


Moscow, 


Idaho. 


Charles City, 


Iowa. 


Los Angeles, 


California. 


Tyler, 


Texas. 


Lebanon, 


Missouri. 


Port Norfolk, 


Virginia. 


Alton, 


Illinois. 


St. Louis, 


Missouri. 


Geneva, 


Nebraska. 


Casey, 


Iowa. 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Houston, 


Texas. 


1700 9th St., 


Des Moines, Iowa 


Webster City, 


Iowa. 


Skagway, 


Alaska. 


501 Poplar 


St., Atlantic Iowa 


Newton, 


Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1885. 



C. L. Bowie, B. M. E., 
L. G. Brown, B. C. E., 

C. A. Cary, B. Sc, D. V. M 

D. B. Collier, B. S. A., 
D. E. Collins, D. V. M., 

G. F. Goodno, B. Sc, M. Sc, 



105 S. 10th St., Tacoma, Washington. 
241 Fisk St., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Auburn, Alabama. 

Durant, Iowa. 

Beatrice, Nebraska. 

Waukegan, Illinois. 

G. H. Glover, B. Sc, D. V. M., 39 Thirty-Fourth Ave., Helena, Mont. 
E. Gray, B. C. E., 1553 Monadnock Block, Chicago, Illinois. 

W. A. Grow, B. Sc, Grantsville, Montana. 

W. H. Hays, B. S. A., M. S. A., St. Anthony Park, Minnesota. 
*E. N. Hill, B. M. E. 

D. L. Hutchison, B. C. E., Goldfield, Colorado. 

Hannah (Hutton) Shearer, B. Sc, Wallisville, Texas. 

L. D. Jackson, B. M. E. 

M. E. Johnson, D. V. M., 107 Corning St., Red Oak, Iowa. 

G. W. Knorr, B. S. A., Clark's Station, Kentucky. 

*C. J. Lee, B. Sc. 

Frank Leverett, B. Sc, Denmark, Iowa. 

J. C. Lipes, B. Sc, Aurora, Missouri. 

J. C. B. Lockwood, B. C. E., 70 Dexter Horton Blvd., Seattle, Wash. 
*Anna G. (McConnon) Bevington, B. Sc. 
L. F. McCoy, B. C. E., Dumont, Iowa. 

A. G. Nosier, B. C. E., Dawson City, N. W. T. 

Anna L. (Nichols) Goodno, B. Sc, Waukegan, Illinois. 

W. B. Niles, D. V. M., Omaha, Nebraska. 

*Oak G. Norton, B. S. A. 



*Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



327 



J. G. Pope, B. M. E., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 

Emma M. (Porter) Sloan, B. Sc, Geneva, Nebraska. 

A. U. Quint, B. Sc, 1715 Ninth St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

E. E. Sayers, D. V. M., Algona, Iowa. 

F. S. Schoenleber, B. S. A., M. S. A., 1639 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 
\. B. Schreckengast, B. Sc, West Liberty, Iowa. 
Lydia A. (Schreckengast) Collier, B. Sc, Durant, Iowa. 
S Stewart, D. V. M., Kansas City, Kansas. 
C.E. Underbill, B. Sc, Onawa, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1886. 



J. \7. Bradford, B. C. E., 
B. Buchli, B. Sc, D. V. M., 
P. S Burns, B. Sc, 
H. L. Chatterton, D. V. M. 
S. D Clough, B, Sc, 
M. Z. Farwell, B. Sc, 
*V. C. Gambell, B. Sc. 
W. E. Gamble, B. Sc, 
S. W. Green, B. S. A., 
S. H. Hedges, B. C. E., 
W. B Hunter, B. Sc, 
A. P.Johnson, B. C. E., 
G.A.Johnson, D. V. M., 
E. S.Johnson, D. V. M., 
Lizzie Langfitt, B. Sc, 
H. J. Langfitt, B. Sc, 
W. R. Myers, B. Sc, 
E. P. Niles, D. V. M., 



10255 S Elizabeth, St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Alma, Kansas. 

Boston, Mass. 

Peterson, Iowa. 

Pine Bluffs, Arkansas. 

La Junta, Colorado. 

100 State St., Chicago, Illinois. 
244, 246 Ex. Bldg., So. Omaha, Nebraska. 
10422 Longwood, Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Cereal Co., Buffalo, New York. 
Sigourney, Iowa. 

Sioux City, Iowa. 

Morning Sun, Iowa. 

Greenfield, Iowa. 

Hutchinson, Minnesota. 

Garvanza, California. 

Blacksburg, Virginia. 

M. H Reynolds, B. S. A., D. V. M., St. Anthony Park, Minnesota. 

O. W. Rich, B. S. A., Atlantic, Iowa. 

E. S. Pichman, B. S. A., M. S. A., Fullerton, California. 

H. S. Stewart, B. C. E., D. V. M., Texarkana, Texas. 

J. J. Stieets, D. V. M., Los Angeles, California. 

Cora ( vVagner) Hunter, B. Sc, Des Moines, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1887. 



Illinois. 
New York. 



G. Z. Birnes, D. V. M., Pekin, 

S. A. Btach, B. S. A., M. Sc, Geneva, 

*R. C. Bennett, D. V. M. 

E. Bess^r, D. V. M., 419 Market St., Logansport, Indiana. 

C. M. Canady, B. C. E., American Bridge Co., 51st St., Pittsburg, . ,'ij 

Pennsylvania. 
Emma L. (Casey) Scofield, B. L., Azusa, 
E. J. Clristie, B. Sc, Cedar Rapids, 

*S. B. Clark, B. Sc. 

G. H. Colton, B. S. A., Seattle, 

*C. J. G>ley, B. Sc. 

Esther Crawford, B. L., Dayton, 

C. F. Cjrtiss, B. S. A., M. S. A., Ames, 



California. 
Iowa. 

Washington. 

Iowa. 
Iowa. 



*Dec;ased. 






328 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



A. C. Felt, B. Sc, 

C. W. Ferguson, D. V. M., 

*W. H. Frater, B. C. E. 

G. S. Govier, B. C. E., 

F. H. Graves, D. V. M., 

Norma (Hainer) Beach, B. Sc, 

L. V. Harpel, B. Sc, 

N. E. Hansen, B. Sc, M. Sc, 

F. W. Hoskins, D. V. M., 

W. S. Igo, D. V. M., 

E. A. Kirkpatrick, B. Sc, M. Ph. 

F. W. Mally, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
O. E. McCarthy, B. C. E. 
A. E. Osborn, B. Sc, 
L. G. Patty, D. V. M., 
Joseph Paxton, B. C. E.. 
J. A. Perley, B. C. E., 
W. A. Peterson, B. Sc, 3046 Wentworth Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

G. R. Randall, B. M. E.. Birchinal, Iowa. 

G. L. Schermerhorn, B. M. E., 101 State St., Schenectadv, BT. Y. 

C. L. Spencer, B. S. A., 222 W. Fourth St., Jacksonville, Florida. 

G. W. Sturtz. B. S. A., Plainview, Nebraska. 

R. P. Thurtle, D. V. M., Ashawa, Iowa. 

John Tillie, D. V. M., Muscatine, Iowa. 

Ollie (Wilson) Curtiss, B. L., Ames, Iowa, 

j. W. Wilson, D. V. M., Traer, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1888. 



Superior, 


Nebraska. 


Chappell, 


Nebraska. 


Argentine, 


Kansas. 


Madrid, 


Iowa. 


Geneva, 


New York. 


Perry, 


Iowa. 


Brookings, 


S. Dakota. 


Sioux Rapids, 


Iowa. 


Palmyra, 


Iowa. 


Fitchburg, 


Mass. 


College Station, 


Texas. 


LaPorte City, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Aspen, 


Colorado. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 



John G. Abraham, B. Sc, 

F. W. Ainsworth, D. V. M., 
J. B. Allen, B. Sc, 
Clarence Baker, B. C. E., 
Ethel Bartholomew, B. Sc, 
Chas. L. Bartholomew, B. Sc, 
Scott Bradford, B. Sc, 

A. Brandvig, B. Sc, 

G. L. Buffington, D. V. M., 
J. G. Davidson, B. M. E., 
F. L. Dobbin, B. Sc, 

*C. A. Finnigan, B. C. E. 
Grant Flora, B. C. E., 
W. N. Gladson, B. M. E., 
K. H. Granger, B. Sc, 
James E. Gyde, B. Sc, 



Mt. Pleasant, 

Pittsburg, 

Cozad, 

Centerville, 

Chariton, 



Iowa. 

Penn. 

Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



623 E. 18th St., Minneapolis Minn. 

Storm Lake, 

Ottumwa, 

Baxter, 

119th St., 

Oklahoma, 

Estherville, 
Fayetteville, 
S. Weymouth, 
Wardner, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Whiting, Indiana. 
O. T. 

Iowa. 
Arkansas. 
Mass 
Idaho. 



Ella (Henderson) Bartholomew, B. L., 

623 F. 18th St., Minneapolis, Mirnesota. 
Chas. W. Hunt, B. Sc, Woodbine, Iowa. 

F. L. Lightner, B. Sc, Iowa Station, Louisiana. 

Elizabeth Louise (McCuskey) Morrison, B. L. 

1002 Third Ave., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 



^Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



329 



G. L. Meisner, B. Sc, 

Laura R. Moulton, B. L., 
E. K. Paine, D. V. M., 
R. C. Sayers, D. V. M., 
E. A. Sheafe, B. Sc, 

B. J. Sheldon, B. Sc, 
E. B. Skinner, B. Sc, 
N. Spencer, B. Sc, 

C. E. Tallman, B. Sc, 
W. L. Thompson, B. Sc, 
L. C. Tilden, B. Sc, 

W. E. Warwick, B. M. E., 
Nannie E. Waugh, B. L., 
Florence (Weatherby) Hainer, B. 
Julia A. (Wentch) Stanton. B. L., 
W. H. Wright, B. Sc, 
Sherman Yates, B. Sc, 



Liberty, 
Grinnell, 

Fairfield, 
120 S. Court St., 
Ames, 
Calliope, 
Algona, 
Scotts Station, 
Bayard, 
Ames, 
Whiting, 
Manchester, 
L., Perry, 
Ames 

Tipton, 



Nebraska. 
Iowa. 
Cuba. 
Iowa. 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Alabama. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Indiana. 
Iowa. 
Oklahoma Territory. 
Iowa. 

Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1889. 

C. A. Ashworth, D. V. M., Valley Junction, Iowa. 
James A. Baker, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

J. E. Banks, B. C. E., American Bridge Co, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
S. W. Beyer, B. Sc, Ph. D., Ames, Iowa. 

D. B. Bisbee, B. Sc, 7340 Bond Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
*A. E. D. Bosquet, D. V. M. 

W. B. Budrow, D. V. M., American Smelting & Refining Co., 

Agnascalientes, Mexico. 
*H. W. Chamberlain, B. Sc 
*F. H. Cooley, B. C. E. 

Harry B. Day, B. M. E., Seymour, Iowa. 

J. E. Durkee, B. Sc, Co. Supt. Buena Vista Co., Storm Lake, Iowa. 

Florida. 

Ontario. 

Iowa. 

Montana. 

O. T. 

New Jersey. 



H. A. Gossard, B. Sc, 

A. L. Graham, B. M. E., 

B. T. Green, B. Sc, 
W. R. Henson, B. Sc, 
Nellie Johnson, B. L., 
James A. Kelsey, B. Sc, M. Sc, 

C. F. Kimball, B. N. E. 
C. W. Lamborn, B. C. E., 
John McBirney. D. V. M., 
Albert McClelland, B. Sc, 



Lake City, 

Sarnia, 

Hawarden, 

Chinook, 

Edmond, 

New Brunswick, 

Court House, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

624, 184 LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

Clarinda, Iowa. 

Ivy, Iowa. 



A. A. McLaughlin, B. Sc, 217 Youngerman Block, Des Moines, Iowa. 

J. A. Meissner, B. Sc, 

S. W. Morris, B. Sc, 

S. B. Nelson, D. V. M. f 

Belle Newell, B. L., 

Ira A. Nichols, B. Sc, 

John H. Piatt, D. V. M., 

W. H. Rickard, B. C. E., 

P. H. Rolfs, B. Sc, M. Sc, 

*John Schoenleber, B. M. E. 



Reinbeck, 


Iowa. 


Corning, 


Iowa. 


Pullman, 


Washington 


Woodward, 


Iowa. 


Iowa Falls, 


Iowa. 


Montezuma, 


Iowa. 


Texarkana, 


Arkansas. 


Miami, 


Florida. 



♦Deceased. 



330 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



W. U. Scott, B. Sc, 

J. O. Simcoke, D. V. M., 

John A. Shelton, B. Sc, 

Wm. R. Shoemaker, B. Sc, 

Virgil Snyder, B. Sc, A. M., Ph 

*Palmer W. Starr, B. C. E. 

C. H. Stearns, B. Sc, 

John S. Stroud, B. Sc, 

M. W. Thornburg, B. Sc, 

Rosalia Thurliman, B. L., 

C. M. Wade, B. Sc, 

Mary C. (Zimbleman) Otis, B. L. 



Slater, Iowa. 

Stuart, Iowa. 

Butte, Montana. 

6124 Ingleside Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
D., 204 University Ave., Ithaca, N.Y. 



Santa Rosa, New Mexico. 

Fifth and Walnut Sts., Des Moines, Iowa. 



Redfield, 

Carroll, 

Sioux City, 

322 Story St., Boone, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1890. 



Nettie Bannister, B. L., Cherokee, Iowa. 

Jay A. Bishop, B. Sc, New Hampton, Iowa. 

Wm. E. Bolles, B. C. E., 223 Eighth St., American Bridge Co., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
John A. Bramhall, B. M. E., Globe Machinery and Supply Co., 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
Meyer Brandvig, B. Sc, M. Ph., 
Joseph S. Chamberlain, B. Sc, 
Herbert E. Crosby, B. Sc, 
Chas. D. Davidson, B. M. E., 
W. C. Dewell, B. Sc, 
Edward N. Eaton, B. Sc, 
Mary E. (Fellows) Weare, B. I 
C. Quintus Fuller, D. V, M., 
*Belle (Gaston) James. 
T. Alexander Geddes, D. V 
J. Melville Graham, B. Sc, 
*May Hardy, E. L. 
Spencer Haven, B. Sc, 
Eugene Henley, B. Sc, 
T. Siegel Howard, B. Sc, 
Thos. S. Kerr, B. Sc, 
Edward A. Kregor, B. Sc, 
Alice Mann, B. Sc, 
Bertha Mann, B. Sc, 
James McLaughlin, D. V. M., 
Ada (Mills) Dewell, B. L., 
James C. Norton, D. V. M., 
Robt. W. Olmsted, B. Sc, 
Violet U. Quint, B. L., 
Maria M. Roberts, B. L. 
Geo. H. Schulte, B. Sc, 
Wm. H. Shaul, B. Sc, 
Kate (Stevens) Harpel, B. L., 
John T. Stinson, B. Sc, 
Rodney B. Swift, B. Sc. 
Edward Thurliman, B. Sc, 



Gilbert Station, 
Baltimore, 
Alta, 
Whiting, 


Iowa. 
Maryland. 
Iowa. 
Indiana. 


Magnolia, 

27 Michigan Ave. 

Morton Park, 

Milford, 


Iowa. 

Chicago, Illino 
Illinois. 
Iowa. 


Washington, 
Audubon, 


D. C. 
Iowa. 


Hudson, 
Brooklyn, 


Wisconsin. 
Iowa. 



M. 



Highland Park, Des Moines, Iowa. 
2829 Calumet Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Cherokee, Iowa. 

948 West Holt Ave., Pamona, California. 






Algona, 
Blue Earth City, 
Magnolia, 
Phoenix, 
Rock Island, 
Webster City, 
Ames, 
Elkader, 
Des Moines, 
Perry, 

Mountain Grove, 
4837 Madison Ave., 
Carroll, 



Iowa. 

Minnesota. 
Iowa. 
Arizona. 
Illinois. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Missouri. 
Chicago, Illinois. 
Iowa. 



♦Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



331 



Leo. Thurliman, B. Sc, M. Sc. 1733 Monadnock Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Cora H. T. (Van Velson) Lambert, B. L., 7306 South Green St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
A. R. Williams, D. V. M., Glenwood, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1891. 



Geo. S. Angus, B. C. E., 

Wm. H. Austin, D. V. M., Newton, 

Chas. A. Ballreich, B. Sc, Box 737, Houston, 



Chicago Heights, Chicago, Illinois. 

Iowa. 



Woodward, 



Sara T. Barrows, B. L., 

Frank J. Browne, B. C. E., 

Donald M. Carter, B. M. E 

Geo. L. Christy, B. C. E., 

*Clinton C. Clarke, B. Sc. 

May (Cottrell) Woods, B. L., 

Robt. M. Dyer, B. M. E., 

Wm. A. Hack, D. V. M., 

Wm. H. Heileman, E. Sc, M. Sc, Pullman, 

Rollin E. Hinds, B. C. E., 

R. Frederick Hodson, B. Sc, 

E. P. Hudson, B. Sc, 

Thomas B. Hutton, B. Sc, 

Wm. H. Jackson, B. C. E., 

Chas. W. Johnson, B. Sc, 

W. Clyde Jones, B. M. E., 

Edwin S. King, B. Sc, 

Eleanor (King,) Moss, B. L., 

Wm. A. McClanahan, D. V. M., 

L. D. McNaughton, B. M. E., 

John H. Moore, B. C. E., 

Berkley Moss, B. C. E., 

Mary A. Nichols, B. L., B. Sc, 

E. C. Oggel, B. Sc, 
John F. Schulte, B. Sc, 
Benjamin. F. Shaum, B. C. E., 
J. H. Shepperd, B. Ag., M. S. A., 

F. A. Sirrine, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
Nels Sorenson, D. V. M., 
John E. Spaan, B. Sc, 
Grant F. Starkev, D. V. M., 
Walter D. Steele, B. M. E., 
Willis C. Swift, B. M. E., 
Dennis A. Thornburg, B. Sc, 
Samuel Whitbeck, D. V. M., 
Peter M. Wilson, D. V. M., 



Texas. 

Ohio. 

Minnesota. 



Columbus, 

Pipestone, 

1410-204 Dearborn St., Chicago, Illinois. 

128 W 128 St., New York, N. Y. 



Iowa. 



641 S Avers Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Maquoketa, Iowa. 

Washington. 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Britt, Iowa. 

Odebolt, Iowa. 

1522-llth St, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Charles City, Iowa. 

5540 Monroe Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Grundy Center, Iowa. 

1052 20th st., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Redding, Iowa. 

Eagle Grove, Iowa. 

814 Foster St., Evanston, Illinois. 

1052 20th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
246 W 84th St., New York, N. Y. 
Orange City, Iowa. 

Victor, Iowa. 

Columbus City, Iowa. 

Fargo, North Dakota. 
Jamaica, Long Island. 

Louisville, Kentucky. 

Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Jordan, Iowa. 

New York City, New York. 

55 Koepnicker St., Berlin, Germany. 
Grinnell, Iowa. 

Decorah, Iowa. 

Traer, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1892. 

Charles B. Adams, D. V. M., 2396 116th St., Chicago, Illinois. 

George M. Ashford, B. C. E., Nevada, Iowa. 

R. B. Benjamin, B. Sc, 1992 W. Van Buren St., Chicago, Illinois. 



•Deceased. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Alice M. Beach, B. Sc, M. Sc, Urbana, Illinois. 

Estella (Blaine) Spence, B. L M 1030 Seventeenth St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Emma H. (Boyd) Jones, B. L., 5540 Monroe Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 



Eugene G. Brown, B. Sc. 
Geo. W. Brown, B. C. E., 
Inez J. Christie, B. L., 
E. E. Clinton, B. C. E., 
W. Ross Cooper, D. V. M. 
Edgar C. Corry, B. Sc, 
Genevieve Culver, B. L., 
Homer Davis, D. V. M., B. Sc 

Anna (Dean) Blair, B. L., 
Chas. C. Deering, B. Sc, 
C. U. Emry, B. C. E., 
George S. Foster, B. C. E., 
Kittie B. Freed, B. L., 
Ellis T. Gilbert, B. Sc, 
Eugene B. Henry, B. Sc, 
William C. Hicks, B. Sc, 
Edwin D. Jones, B. C. E., 
Elmer E. Kaufman, B. Ag., 
S. Arthur Knapp, B. Sc, 
E. A. Littell, B. C. E., 
C. W. Mally, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
Jessie (Maxwell) Freeland, B. 
Frank L. Meredith, B. Sc, 



Mason City, Iowa. 

Boone, Iowa. 

East St. Louis, Illinois. 

703 Irving St., Portland, Oregon. 
Newton, Iowa. 

Manhattan Building, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Audubon, Iowa. 

M. Sc, 2617 Franklin St., 

Omaha, Nebraska. 



East Des Moines, Iowa. 

Boone, Iowa. 

Fairfield, Iowa. 

Evanston, Wyoming. 

Arapahoe, Nebraska. 

202 N. Eighth St., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

Klamath Falls, Oregon. 

9909 Ewing Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

Hamburg, Arkansas. 

Fargo, N. Dakota. 

Lake Charles, Louisiana. 

Audubon, Iowa. 

Cape Town, South Africa 

L., 101 G St., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Clarice (McCarthy) McNaughton, B. L., Eagle Grove, Iowa. 
Wilton McCarthy, D. V. M., Fifth and Walnut Sts., Des Moines, Iowa. 



Delmar Junction. 

Eby, 

Des Moines, 

Graettinger, 

Ames, 



Iowa. 

California. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



E. S. McCord, D. V. M., 

W. P. Milburn, B. M. E., 

Gordon P. Miller, B. Sc, 

C. R. Molison, D. V. M, 

*Jennie (Morrison) Beyer, B. Sc 

Fred R. Muhs, B. C. E., Am. Bridge Co., San Francisco, California. 

Fred S. Phelps, B. Sc, Gournee, Illinois. 

Kate M. (Porter) Gess, B. L., St. Anthony, Idaho. 

Henry Replogle, D. V. M., 385 S. Hermitage Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

Jerry Replogle, D. V. M., Centerville, Iowa. 



John A. Rolfe, B. Sc, Eldridge, 

T. T. Rutlegde, B. Ag., 

J. F. Saylor, B. Sc , Spokane, 

Robt. Sloan, B. Sc, Geneva, 

Louis B. Spinney, B. M. E., M. Sc, Ames, 

Fred C. Stewart, B. Sc, M. Sc, Geneva, 

Arthur C. Stokes, B. Sc, Omaha, 

*C. E. Swenson, B. Sc. 

Waltet E. Trotter, B. M. E., 339 Fifth Ave., 

C. C. Van Houten, B. Agr., Ames, 

H. C. Wallace, B. Agr., Des Moines, 

G. S. Waterhouse, D. V. M., Charter Oak, 



Iowa. 

P. I. 

Washington. 

Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

New York. 

Nebraska. 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 



*Deceased. 



I 1 ST OF GRADUATES 



333 



Hugh H. West, 1). V. M„ 

Elmina T. Wilson, B. C. E., C. 
Flora H. Wilson, B. L., 
Vincent Zmunt, B. Sc, 



Spurling Bldg., Elgin, Illinois. 



Ames, 
Washington, 
Iowa City, 



Iowa. 
D. C. 

Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1893. 



D. 



Frank W. Austin, B. C. E., Manvel, California. 

Bert Benjamin, B. M. E., 1193 Millard Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

E. C. Boutelle, B. M. E., 31 Indiana St., Chicago, Illinois. 

C. E. Brown, B. M. E., Peterboro, Ontario, Canada. 

A. Alene (Chestek) Stewart, B. L., 48 Brook St., Geneva, New York. 

D. G. Cooper, D. V. ML, 2626 Capitol Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. 
Virginia H. Corbett, B. L., Ft. Collins, Colorado. 

F. E. Davidson, B. C. E., 7406 Kimback Ave., Grand Crossing, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
C. M. Day, D. V. M., St. Joseph, Missouri. 

Earl Douglas, B. Sc, Missouri, Montana. 

Jennie Downing, B. L., Brookings, S. D. 

Edwin M. Duroe, Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 

K. H. Fairfield, B. Ag., Creston, Iowa. 

Kate M. Farr, B. L., Bozeman, Montana. 

E. E. Faville, B. Ag., Doylestown, Penn. 
J. H. Gasson, D. V. M., Missouri Valley, Iowa. 
Margaret I. (Gifford) Hodson, B. L., Ames, Iowa. 
Ernest F. Green, B. Sc. 
*J. Le Roy Guernsey, C. E. 
W. E. Harriman, B. Sc, M 
C. E. Hart, B. M. E., 
W. E. Herring, B. C. E., 
Royal T. Hodgkins, B. M. E., 
Jessie B. Hudson, B. Sc, B. L 
Geo. W. Hursey, B. Sc, 
Jno. A. James, B. Sc, 31 
J. F. Jones, B. Sc, 
Edward J. Kearney, B. M. E 
Fred L. Kent, B. Ag., 

G. A. Ketterer, B. Sc, 
G. A. Kuehl, B. C. E., 
Willis E. Lincoln, D. V. M., 
Willard C. Lusk, B. Sc , 
J. A. Maguire, B. Sc, 
P. J. Maguire, B. Sc, 
Berthold W. Manville, B. E. E 
C. A. McCall, D. V. M., 
*F. B. McCall, D. V. M. 
G. E. McKim, B. C. E., 
Ira J. Merrill, B. M. E., 
Charles. L. Miles, B. Sc, 
Grace Mills, B. L. 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 



Ames, 
Davenport, 

224 Bowen St., St. Louis, Missouri. 
New York City, New York. 

Lansing, Iowa. 

Hedrick, Iowa. 

Washington Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Iowa City, Iowa. 

905 State St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
Corvallis, Oregon. 

Circle City, Alaska. 

933 Turner Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

Yankton, South Dakota. 
Lincoln, Nebraska. 

1005-100 Washington St, Chicago, Illinois. 
1104 Ella St., Beatrice. Nebraska. 
Kansas City, Kansas. 



St. Joseph, Missouri. 

335 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

Charles City, Iowa. 

Flandreau, South Dakota. 
Ella B. (Morton) Kearney, B. L., 905 State St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
C. K. Munns, B. E. E., M. A. in E. E., Corning, Iowa. 



*Deceased. 



334 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



H. H. Nichols, B. Sc, 

D. W. Patton, D. V. M. f 
Florence G. (Parkhill) Kuehl, B. 

Lavenia Price, B. Sc, Cor. 18 

Helen Radnich, B. L., 
Roscoe G. Rice, B. E. E., 
Mary C. Rolfs, B. L , 
Wilmont G. Rundall, B. Sc, 

E. E. Smith, B. Sc, 
*Evelyn E. Starr, B. Sc, B. L. 

F. S. Tufts, D. V. M., 

Belle (Wentch) Wood, B. Sc. 

B. F. White, D. V. M. 

Vinnie (Williams) Grattan, B. L. 



Ackley, Iowa. 

822 E 48th St., Chicago, Illinois. 
L., B. Sc, 933, Turner Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 
and Center Sts, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Davis City, Iowa. 

237-30th St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Fairfield, Illinois. 

Buffalo, New York. 

Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 



5726 S Green St, 
Traer, 
Hampton, 
Medford, 



Chicago. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
O. T. 



GRADUATES OF 1894. 



W. J. Ballard, B. Sc, 
Cassie Pearl Bigelow, B. L., 
O. N. Bossingham, D. V. M., 
Harry S. Bowen, B. M. E., 
S D. Bowie, B. Ag., 



Irvington, 
Pueblo, 
Algona, 
224 E. Sixty-Fifth St. 
Chelan, 



Iowa. 

Colorado. 

Iowa. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Washington. 
Blanch M. (Bradley) White, B. L., Hampton, Iowa. 

W. J. Burdess, B. M. E., Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

L. Iowa Campbell, B. L., Newton, Iowa. 

W. Lee Campbell, B. M. E., Chicago Electric Co., Chicago, Illinois. 
Frank H. Campbell, B. M. E., 
W. G. Carlson, B. Sc, 
G. W. Carver, B. Ag., 
Ida M. (Clark) Campbell, B. L., 
Louis B. Craig, B. M. E., 
Ella B. Curtis, B. L., 
Fannie E. (Curtiss) Craig, B. L., 
W. R. Cooper, B. Sc, 
E. C. Dickinson, B. M. E., 
S. R. Fitz, B. Sc , 
Annie W. Flemming, B. Sc, 
Anna Georgen, B. L., 
W. H. Gemmill, B. Sc, 
Emil Hensen, B. M. E., 
Alvin W. Hoyt, B. Sc, 
Winifred Hunter Evans, B. L., 
Burton D. Knickerbocker, B. M. 
H. R. Kreger, B. Sc, 
W. G. Langfitt, B. M. E., 
C. G. Lee, B. Sc, 
Charles Lincoln, B. M. E., 
Scott W. Linn, B M. E., 
E. M. S. McLaughlin, B. M. E., 
Alex. McKinnon, B. M. E., 
W. L. Meinzer, B. Sc, 



Fort Worth, 


Texas. 


Willow Lake, 


S. Dakota. 


Tuskegee, 
Clear Lake, 


Alabama. 
Iowa. 


Newport News, 
Independence, 
Newport News, 
Newton, 


Virginia. 
Iowa. 
Virginia. 
Iowa. 


495 Laurel St., 


Elgin, Illinois 


Steamboat Rock, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Worthington, 


Iowa. 


Sigourney, 
Great Falls, 


Iowa. 
Montana. 


1402 A Ave., Cedar 


Rapids, Iowa 


Searsboro, 


Iowa. 


;., 1233 Jackson Blvd 
Bloomfield, 


., Chicago, 111 


Nebraska. 


Hutchinson, 


Minnesota. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


Detroit, 


Michigan. 


Cleveland, 


Ohio. 


Newton, 


Iowa. 


Windsor, 


Connecticut. 


Howard, 


S. Dakota. 



"Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



335 



John Meissner, B. Sc, Leighton, Iowa. 

J. C. Miller, B. C. E., Galesburg, N. Dakota. 

H. G. Moore, D. V. M., 316 Exchange Bldg., U. S. Yards, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Bertha M. Mosier, B. L., Linden, Iowa. 

W. A. Murphy, B. M. E., 1527 S. Twelfth St., St. Joseph, Missouri. 
Emma (Pammel) Hansen, B. L., M. Sc, Brookings, South Dakota. 
Nora M. (Person) Sanborn, B. L., 25 Galena Blk., Salt Lake City, Utah. 



New Virginia, 

Vicksburg, 

Koszta, 
, Doylestown, 
1141 Nineteenth St 

East Des Moines, 

Nashville, 

Millersburg, 



A. A. Peters, D. V. M., 

Albert M. Price, B. M. E., 

C. E. Read, B. Agr., 

C. D. Reed, B. Ag., 

Herbert Rutledge, B. M. E 

Edith B. (Ryan) Faville, B 

W. L. Ryan, B. Sc, 

Geo. T. Schlenker, B. Sc, 

A. H. Seaver, B. C. E., 

Harry Shanks, D. V. M., 

Maha (Silliman) Munns, B. L., C, Corning, ' 

Emma F. Sirrine, B. Sc. , M. Sc, Dysart, 

*H. J. Stevens, D. V. M. 

A. W. Stuntz, B. E. E., 

Clarence Van Epps, B. Sc, 

Arthur R. Wake, D. V. M., 

Carter B. Weaver, B. Sc, 

Alda Wilson, B. C. E., 

Ellsworth Wilson, D. V. M., 

Elvin J. Wilson, D. V. M., 

C. O. Williamson, B. E. E., 

J. T.Young, B. M.E., 



Winterset, Iowa. 

376 Chicago St., Elgin, Illinois. 



Iowa. 
Miss. 
Iowa. 
Pennsylvania. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 



Owensburg, Kentucky. 

Clinton, Iowa. 

Kansas City, Missouri. 

Ames, Iowa. 

425 Beldin Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Jewell, Iowa. 

North English, Iowa. 

14 W. Fourth St., St. Paul, Minn. 
Milton, N. Dakota. 



GRADUATES OF 1895. 

Arthur J. Ashby, B. E, E, Humbolt, Iowa. 

Florence A. (Baker) McManus, B. Sc, 1162 E Pierce St, 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Logan, Utah. 

Montour, Iowa. 

Lafayette, Indiana. 

Kansas City, Missouri. 

543, 35th St., Chicago, Illinois. 



Elmer D. Ball, B. Sc, M. Sc, 

A. J. Banks, B. M. E., 

A. W. Bitting. D. V. M., B. S., 

Richard Blanche, D. V. M., 

C. E. Brockhausen, B. M. E., 

Ira C. Brownlie, B. Sc, D. D. S., 305 Tabor Opera House Blk., 

Denver, Colorado. 



Charles Cave, B. E. E., Waverly, 

J. W. Crawford, B. Sc, Newton, 

Effie J. (Curtis) Campbell, B. L., Fort Worth, 



J. G. Danielson, B. Ag., 

J. R. Davidson, B. Sc, 

E. T. Davison, D. V. M. 

Ruth (Duncan) Tilden, B. L., 

C.R. Duroc, B. M. E., 

W. J. Eck. B. M. E., 156 Lake St., C. & N. W. Railway, Chicago, 111 



Harcourt, 
Louisville, 

Ames, 

Sioux Rapids, 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Texas. 

Iowa. 

Kentucky. 

Iowa. 
Iowa. 



♦Deceased. 



336 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



M 



C. H. Eckles, B. Ag., M. S. A., 
A. H. Foster, B. M. E„ 
Jerome B. Frisbee, B. Ag., 
Burt German, B. M. E., 
Clarence Goddard, B. C. E. 
W. E. Gossard, B. Sc., 

G. D. Gunn, B. Sc, 
Geo. W. Hardin, B. Sc., 
A. C. Helmer, B. M. E. 

D. M. Hosford, B. E. E., 
N. C. Hurst, B. M. E., 
Chas. Stewart Hutchinson, B 
Ira B. Johnson, B. Sc, 
Raymond Johnson, D. V 
Fred J. Lazelle, B. Sc, 
C. C Lewis, B. M. E., 
H. T. Lewis, B. M. E., 
John W. Lewis, B. C. E., 
L. L. Lewis, D. V. M., 
G. W. Louthan, B. Ag , 
F. R. Lyford, B. C. E., 
Nellie Maguire, B. L., 
W. R. McCready, B. C. E., 
Mary B. (McNeill) Aten, B 
A. E. Mellinger, B. M. E., 
J. H. Meyers, B. Ag., 
Lillian Mills, B. L., 
J. A. Moore, B. C. E., 
Hulda M. Nelson, B. Sc, 
Wm. J. Oliver, B. Sc, 
Morrill J. Orr, B. M. E 



Columbia, Missouri. 

New Bedford, Massachusetts. 



Sheldon, 
Dayton, 

Webster City 
Sumner, 
Castle, 
Davenport, 
28 Kenwood St., 
Burlington, 



Iowa. 
Ohio. 

Iowa. 

Nebraska. 
Montana. 
Iowa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Iowa. 



Sc, M. D., Harrison, Arkansas. 

Marne, Iowa. 

Richland, Iowa. 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Nira, Iowa. 

Nira, Iowa. 

Ft. Sheridan, Chicago, Illinois. 
Stillwater, O. T. 

Linn Grove, Iowa. 

R. F. D. No. 5, Kansas City, Missouri. 
254 E. Tenth St., St. Paul, Minnesota. 
3847 Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
., Garden Grove, Iowa. 

59 Aberdeen St , Chicago, Illinois. 
Spokane, Washington. 

Flandreau, S. Dakota. 

4621 Champlain Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Gowrie, Iowa. 

Armotor Co., Chicago Heights, Chicago, 111. 
1329 Jennings St., Sioux City, Iowa. 



Mabel Ruth (Owens) Wilcox, B. L., Washington, 



M 



Lola A. Placeway, B. Sc, 
♦John M. Preston, B. Ag. 
Erwin E. Reed, B. Sc, 
Thomas L. Rice, D. V 
W. D. Rich, B. Sc, 
Albert Richmond, B. C. 
F. S. Roop, D. V. M., 
Ethel B. Rundall, B. Sc. 
♦George D. Sabin, B. M 
J. C. Sample, B. C. E., 
Roger S. Sanborn, B. Sc 
Fred Schleiter, B. E. E., 
J. I. Schulte, B. Ag., 
John M. Sokol, B. Sc, 



Ames, 



D. C. 
Iowa. 



Monticello, Iowa. 

, 4521 Evans Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

Ames, Iowa. 

., Edmunds, N. Dakota. 

214 Fourteenth St., Charlottsville, Virginia. 



Emmetsbun 



Iowa. 



2531 Magnolia St., Chicago, Illinois. 

25 Galena Block, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

, Ames, Iowa. 

1921 Thirteenth St. N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Cook County Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. 



W. J. Thomas, B. C. E., Brooklyn Branch, Am. Bridge Co., New York. 
R. H. Walker, B. M. E , Britt, Iowa. 

Etta J. Whipple, B. Sc, S. Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Chas. A. Wilson, B. Ag., W. W. Wilson & Co., U. S. Yards, 

Chicago, Illinois. 



*Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



337 



E. K. Wilson, B. Ag M 
O. P. Woodburn, B. M. E., 
John I. Wright, B. Ag., 
Laura (Wyatt) Cutler, B. Sc, 



Chenoy, 

Rock Rapids, 

Kilduff, 

Harlan, 



Washington. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 



GRADUATEL OF 1896. 



Mildred Anderson, B. L., Walnut, Iowa. 

Carlton, R. Ball, B. Sc, M. Sc, Washington, D. C. 

Hazel Leona, (Beardshear) Chambers, B. L., 2205, Lincoln Avenue, 

Denver, Colorado. 
C. E., Bedford, Iowa. 

Davenport, Iowa. 



(Blakemore) J. F. Blakemore, B 
Elmer N. Bonnell, B. Sc, 
W. A. Bryan, B. Sc, 
Agnes M. Cole, B. Sc, 
*Robert Combs, B. Sc , 
Bert Dunham, B. E. E, 
Raymond B. Eckles, B 



M. Sc 



Honolulu, 
Ames, 



H. I. 
Iowa. 



Ag., 



85 Hammond St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Doylestown, Pennsylvania. 



J. J. Edgerton, B. Ag., 166 Adams St., Prairie Farmer, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
James W. Elliott, B. C. E., Toledo, Ohio. 

Nettie A. Fibbs, B. C. E., B. C. E., 1212 Fifth Ave. S, Ft. Dodge, Iowa. 
Edith (Foster) Orr, B. Sc, 1329 Jennings St., Sioux City, Iowa. 

Ella Weed (French) Robinson, B. Sc, Alexander, Iowa. 

Frank E. French, B. C. E., Belden, New Mexico. 

L, M. Goodman, B. M. E., Britt, Iowa 

Maud Hursey, B. L., Morvia, Iowa. 

C. P. Johnson, B. Sc, Jamaica, Iowa. 

C. F. Langlass, B. M. E., 608 W 113th St., New York City, New York. 
Robert R. Landon, B. M. E., 1115 G St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 
Myrtle ( Little) Fowler, B. L., Ames, Iowa. 

NOra Lockwood, B. Sc, George, 

Elbert C. Macy, B. C. E., Waverly, 

Stella (McLainj Lawrence, B. L., 



Ph. 



Boone, 
Baxter, 
Creighton, 
Boone, 

Jefferson, 

Ames, 

Linden, 

Ames, 

Bedford, 

Gilmore City, 

Brocksbur^r, 

Portsmouth, 



Carl H. McLean, B. Ag„ M 

Mary J. Maguire, B. Sc, 

T. J. Mahoney, B. Sc, 

*Watson Mason, B. M E. 

Fred W. Mathews, B. Sc, 

Ira J. Mead, B. Ag., M. S. A 

Claude C. Mills, B. Sc, 

S. B. Mills, B. Ag., 

C. O. Pool, B. Sc, 

Lillian Porterfield, B. Sc , 

Herbert L. Preston, B. Sc, 

Ivan B. Roscoe, B. Sc, 

Rose (Rummel) Smith, B. Sc, Ames, 

E. A. Sherman, B. Sc, Care of Richard Sherman, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

Chas. H. Speers, B. M. E., Oxford, Iowa. 

Geo. L. Steelsmith, B. Sc, Dawson City, Alaska. 

Henry C. Taylor, B. A^;., Madison, Wisconsin. 

Robert G. Weaver, B. Sc, New York City, New York. 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Nebraska. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



♦Deceased. 

22 



338 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



W. W. Wentch, B. M. E., Chicago, Illinois. 

B. W. Wilson, B. Ag., Butte, Montana. 

James W. Wilson, B. Ag., M. Ag., 2101 S St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Arthur L. Kinzer, B. Sc, Storm Lake, Iowa. 

Geo. W. Zorn, B. C. E., Cheyenne, Wyoming. 

GRADUATES OF 1897. 



Mary Ellen Barger, B. Sc, 
C. A. Bergeman, B. M. E., 
E. C. Bierbaum, B. Sc, 
Frank W. Bouska, B. Ag., 
Guy S. Brewer, B. Sc, 
Andrew Brown, B. Sc, 
Jas. R. Burnip, B. Sc, 
Orange R. Cole, B. E. E., 
Robert A. Craig, D. V. M., 
Philip E. Damon, B. Ag., 
Geo. Dana, B. M. E., 
Ole Davidson, B. C. E., 
Gwendolen (Doxsee) Reed, B. 
Louis A. Duroe, B. Sc, 
L. Mae (Fellows) Banks, B. L., 
Wallace C. Gaberson, B. Sc, 
Otto H. Gersbach, B. C. E., 



Ontario, 
Grand Works, 
Walla Walla, 

394 W. Thirteenth St. 
Whitaker Bldg 
Marathon, 
St. Joseph, 
Lafayette, 
Pierce Ctty, 



Iowa. 

Illinois. 
Washington. 
Iowa. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 
Davenport, Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Missouri. 
Indiana. 
Missouri. 
921 Main St., Racine, Wisconsin. 
Little Rock, Arkansas. 

Monticello, Iowa. 

Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 

Montour, Iowa. 

904 Ninth St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
6040 Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 



Blanche E. (Greeley) Wilson, B. L., 6401 Parnell Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 



Glenn D. Heald, B. M 
Margaret Jones, B. Sc, 
Ward M. Jones, B. C. E., 
Wm. S. Joseph, B. C. E., 
Robert E. King, B. E. E., 
Helen L. Knapp, B. L., 
Edwin P. Kribbs, B. Sc, in Min 
Chas. E. Le Buhn, B. Sc, 
Frank W. Linebaugh, B. M. E., 
Thomas W. Mast, B. Ag., 
Frank McConnon, B. Sc, 
George B. McWilliams, B. C. E., 
Elizabeth A. (Morphy) Tilden, B 
Joseph S. Morrison, B. C. E., 
Wilmon Newell, B. Sc, M. Sc, 
Ernest A. Pattengill, B. S., 
Geo. W. Patterson, B. M. E., 
Allen Rae, B. M. E., 430 N. 
Edith Redmon, B. L., 
Emerson G. Reed, B. E. E., 
Edward F. Rhodenbaugh, B. Sc 
Ambrose C. Rice, B. Sc, 
Moss F. Rolfe, B. Sc, 
Margaret H. Rutherford, B. Sc, 
Arthur F. Sample, B. Ag., 
Herman T. Schmidt, B. E. E 
Frank B. Spencer, B. E. E., 



Farley, Iowa. 

604 W. Adams St., Chicago, Illinois. 



Ames, 
Creston, 
Ames, 

Lake Charles, 
E., Grave, 
Davenport, 
Ames, 

Mount Vernon, 
Monticello, 
Waterloo, 
L., Ames, 
Mason City, 
Wooster, 
Ames, 
257 Rice St., St. 
Pine St., Austin, 

Highland Center, 

Elkhart, 

Denison, 

Des Moines, 

Goodell, 

Crystal, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Louisiana. 
Oregon. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 

S. Dakota. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Ohio. 
Iowa. 
Paul, Minnesota. 
Illinois. 
Iowa. 
Indiana. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 

N. Dakota. 
Iowa. 



Lebanon, 
1342 W 3rd St., Davenport, Iowa. 
1838 Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



339 



Geo. L. Stearns, B. E. E., Hawkeye Tel. Co., Eagle Grove, Iowa. 

Olive E. Stevens, B. L., Ames, Iowa. 

Clarence E. Tanton, B. Sc, Orange City, Iowa. 

Hannah M. Thomas, B. Sc, Corning, Iowa. 

Minta A. (Tilden) Macy, B. L., Waverly, Iowa. 

Edwin R. Townsend, B. M. E., Cleveland, Ohio. 

John James Vernon, B. Ag. M. Sc, Messila Park, New Mexico. 

Ida L. Watkins, B. L., Grundy Center, Iowa. 

iasper Wilson, B. Ag., Washington, D. C. 

.awrence Winne, B. Sc, Humboldt, Iowa. 

Clarence A. Hartman, B. Sc, Missouri Valley, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1898. 



Moses C. Adamson, B. Sc, 
Ralph W. Barclay, B. Ag., 
Amanda J. Barger, B. Sc, 
Esther Beatty, B. L., 
John N. Bonnell, B. Sc, 
Leora May Bonwell, B. Sc, 
Otis S. Boyd, B. Sc, 
Harvey D. Bozarth, B. E., 
Cyrus J. Bristol, B. M. E., 
Harry J. Brown, B. Sc, 
John C. Brown, B. Ag., M. Sc. 



Dana, Iowa. 

West Liberty, Iowa. 

Ontario, Iowa. 

802 West 111. St., Urbana, Illinois. 
Davenport, Iowa. 

Viola Center, Iowa. 

Roland, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Swift & Co., Chicago, Illinois. 
Courtney, N. Dakota. 

430 Francis St., Madison, Wisconsin. 



Olive Z. Brown, B. L., 609 23rd and L. Streets, S Omaha, Nebraska. 
Ena M. (Burnham) Eckles, B. L. Doylestown, Pennsylvania. 

Glenn C. Clark, B. Sc, 1001 Nat'l. Life Bldg, Chicago, Illinois. 

Margaret M. Cooper, B. L., Magnolia, Iowa. 

John Craig, B. Ag., Ithaca, New York. 

W. J. Devine, B. E. E. ( 423 7th Ave., Clinton, Iowa. 

Gordon F. Dodge, B. M. E„ Illinois Steel Co., Chicago, Illinois. 



Will S. Duncan; B. Sc . 
Harry E. Dyer, B. Sc, 
Willis C. Edson, B. Sc, 
Ada ( Ellis) Johnson, B. L., 
Sadie Ellis, B. L., 
Harry J. Evans, B. Ag., 
Frederick Faville. E. Sc, 
Oliver J. Fay, B. Sc, 
Elmer Franklin, B. Sc, 
Orville S. Franklin, B. Sc, 
James Galloway, B. M. E., 
Thomas Gallowaj, B. M. E., 
Theron S. Grant, B. Sc, 
Howard N. Grettenberg, B. Ag., 
J. H. Grisdale, B. Ag., 
Wm. H. Grover, B. E. E. 
Manlon J. Hammer, B. C. E., 
Chas. D. Heckard, D. V, M., 
Ole J. Henderson, B. Sc, 
Benj. H. Hibbard, B. Ag., 
Elmer R. Hodson, B. Sc, M. Sc, 



2433, Ohio St., Chicago, Illinois. 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

Storm Lake, Iowa. 

Jamaica, Iowa. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Humboldt, Iowa. 

Storm Lake, Iowa. 

Augustina Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. 



Platteville, 
Mitchellvile, 
Milwaukee, 
Burlington, 
Lusk, 
M. Sc, 
Ottawa, 
Cherokee, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 

Wisconsin. 
Iowa. 
Wyoming. 
Lockland, Ohio. 
Ontario. 
Iowa. 



6040 Ellis Ave., Chicago Illinois. 
Wheatland, Iowa. 

Webster City, Iowa. 

Ames. Iowa. 

Washington, D. C. 



340 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



♦Ralph H. Hollenbeak, B. C. E. 

Sarah C. Hook, B. L., Ames, 

Monroe R Hull, B. Sc., B. M. E, Chicago, 



Ewing M. Johnson, B. Sc, 
Irene Jones, B. Sc. 
Axel Kolling, D. V. M., 
John C. Kyle, B. E. E.. 



Greene, Butler Co., 
Manchester, 
Hawkeye, 
Pittsburg, 



Iowa. 
Illinois. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Pennsylvania. 



Fred R. Lowery, B. Sc, B. M, E., 1315 W. 26th St., DesMoines, Iowa 



Kate La Rue, B. L., 



Van Horn, 



Iowa. 



Fred N. Lewis, B. C. E., Y. M. C. A. Bldg., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Edward E. Little, B. Ag., Ames, Iowa. 

John B. Love, B. Ag., Everett, Washington. 

C. J. McCusker, B. Sc, Augustina Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. 
Willis McKay, B. Sc, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Pearl McWilliams, B. Sc, Waterloo, Iowa. 

W. H. Meek, B. Sc, Scranton, Iowa. 

Royal Meeker, B. Sc, 235 W. 123d St., New York City, New York. 
Roger C. Mills, B. Ag., Alta, Iowa. 

David W. Morgan, B. E. E., U. S. S. Monterey, Manila, P. I. 

George E. Nesom, D. V. M., B. Sc, Clemson College, S. Carolina. 



Jessie J. Parker, B. Sc, Ames, 

A J. Perrin, B. C. E., Hartshorne, 

Eugene D. Perry, B. Sc, Ann Arbor, 

Marius J. Pos, B. M. E., 442 Sibley St., Cleveland, 



Ellson G. Preston, B. Ag., 

Elizabeth (Read) Cohn, B. L., 

Alice E. Reed, B. L., 

O. W. Rowe, D. V. M., 

Stella M. Russell, B. L., 

Joseph Harry Scurr, B. Ag , 

Henry W. Skinner, B. M. E., 

Uollie M. (Snelson) Hogan (?) B. Sc, Massena, 

Edwin M. Stanton, B. Sc 

Frank C. Stetzel, B. Sc, 

C. T. Stevens, B. Sc, 

Mabelle T. Stewart, B. L. 

Simon W. Tarr, B. C. E., 

Margaret M. Taylor, B. L., 

Wm. C. Tilden, B. Sc, 

Harry E. Titus, D. V. M., 

Annie M. (Walker) Kingsbery, B. Sc, Osage, 

Wm. W. Warden, B. Ag., 

Lorena Webber, B. Sc, 

Alvah P. Whitmore, B. Ag., 

Ira B. Williams, B. Sc, 

John H. Wykoff, B. C. E., 



Iowa. 

I. T. 

Michigan. 

Ohio. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 



Des Moines, 

Ames, 

Monticello, 

Utica, 

Storm Lake, 

Gilman, 

Swift & Co., Chicago, Illinois. 

Iowa. 
Philadelphia, Penn. 

802 Nicolett Ave., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Alden, Iowa. 

Gilbert Station, ( ? ) Iowa. 
18 George St., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Olin, Iowa. 

Stanwood, Iowa. 

Logansport, Indiana. 

Iowa. 

Van Cleve, Iowa. 

Renwick, Iowa. 

1214 Farnam St., Omaha, Nebraska. 

Ames, Iowa. 

C. & G. W. Ry., Dubuque, Iowa. 



GRADUATES OF 1899. 



Howard W. Adams. B. Sc, 
J. Randolph Allen, B. Sc, 
R. C. Anderson, B. M. E., 



Y. M. C. A. Bldg., Freeport, Illinois. 
Crookston, Minnesota. 

318 Hanover St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



*Deceased. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



341 



Judson W. Deering, B. C. E. 
Howard L. Eckles, B. Sc, 
Fannie Ora Edgett, B. Sc, 
George L. Ehlers, B. Sc, 
Henrv 0. Fritzel, B. Sc, 



Herbert B. Bolks, B. Sc, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

George W. Brooks, B. Sc, in E. E. 2624 Fulton St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Clare A. Campbell, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

Elsie B. (Davis) Malcome, B. Ph., 2038 Clarendon Ave., 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Janesville, Wisconsin. 

Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Plymouth, Iowa. 

Conrad, Iowa. 

Lucy "A. Giffen, B. Ph., 917 Cauldwell, Ave., New York, New York. 
Fannie M. Gilbert, B. Ph., Gilbert Station, Iowa. 

John L. Gillespie, B. Sc, in E. E., Cape Nome, Alaska. 

A. R. Glaisyer, D. V. M., 1621 West Boone Ave., Spokane, 

Washington. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Perry, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Fort Collins, Colorado. 

Millersburg, Iowa. 

C. & N. W. Ry., Mason, City, Iowa. 

Columbia University, New York. 

Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Iowa. 
Wisconsin. 



Katherine Goble, B. Ph., 

Racine D. Goble, B. Sc, 

Ernest E. Granger, B. Sc, 

Clarence J. Griffith, B. S. A., 

Walter J. Griffith, B. S. A., 

Roland O. Hayter, B. M. E., 

Alice Ward Hess, B. Sc, 

Laurence Hodson, B. C. E., 

Dennis E. Hollingsworth, B. S. A., Peru 

Arthur G. Hopkins, B. S. A., Madison, 



W.J. Kennedy, B. S. A., 
William H. Leathers, B. Sc, 
C. P. Liegrot, D. V. M., 
John P. Lund, B. Sc, 
Erna Maguire, B. Sc, 



Iohn C. Horning, B. Sc, in E. E. 1221 Marquette Building, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
H. Harold Hume, B. S. A., Lake City, Florida. 

Edward W. Humphrey, D. V. M., Spinson, Iowa. 

M. S. Hyland, B.Sc in E. E., 661 Burling St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Mapleton, Iowa. 

Villisca, Iowa. 

St. Ansgar, Iowa. 

Bloomington Prairie, Minnesota. 
Norman J. Malcome, B. Sc, 2038 Clarendon Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Walter S. Marston, B. M. E., Koken Iron Works, St. Louis. Missouri. 
Floyd H. McQuiston, B. Sc, in E. E. Fairfield, Iowa. 

Edith I. Metcalf, B. Ph., Hot Springs, S. Dakota. 

*Ethel Ray Mills, B. Ph. 

Ruth Morrison, B. Ph., Columbia University, New York City, N. Y. 
Fay I. Nichols, B. C. E., Am. Bridge Co., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
George D. Nicoll, B. Sc. in E. E., 332 Germania Ave., Schenectady, 

New York. 
Thomas E. Nicoll, B. Sc, in E. E., Cherokee, Iowa. 

Chester M. Perrin, B. Sc„ Ames, Iowa. 

Russell Read, B. Sc, Ames, Iowa. 

Frank J. R.ettermaier, B. Sc, Carroll, Iowa. 

Ames, . Iowa. 

Dallas Center, Iowa. 

Whatcom, 



Harry V. Rice, B. Sc. in E. E., 
Charles Rinehart, B. S. A., 
Fordyce W. Rhodes, B. Sc, 



Washington. 



*Deceased. 



342 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Guy Roberts, B. Sc Marathon, Iowa. 

Burton R. Rogers, D. V. M., 1201 W. Garfield Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 
George M. Rommel, B. S. A., U. S. Dept., of Agriculture, 

Washington, D. C, 
Charles F. Rottler, B. Sc, 615 Oak Park Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Harry W. Sayles, B. Sc. in E. E., Peoria, Illinois. 

D. J. Scholten, B. Sc, 635 W. Adams St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Frank A. Schuetz, B. Sc, New Hampton, Iowa. 

Now Mrs. W. Seaver, Annie C. Seaver, B. Ph., Beloit, Wisconsin. 
George A. Smith, B. C. E., Des Moines Bridge and Iron Works, 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
1712 Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Ames, Iowa. 

Ogden, Iowa. 

Storm Lake, Iowa. 

Conway, Iowa. 

Parkersburg, Iowa. 

Clermont, Iowa. 

Rockford Schools, New Rockford, 

North Dakota. 
New Hampton, Iowa. 

817 15th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 
E. E., Ames, Iowa. 

E., 1312 Dawson St., Toledo, Ohio. 
Ames, Iowa. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

New York. 



S. P. Smith, D. V. M., 
C. F. Spring, B. Sc, 
Carl A. Steele, B. S. A., 
Wayne Stillman, D. V. M., 
James M. Stimson, B. Sc, 
Frederick V. Stout, B. S. A., 
Adele H. Stuhr, B. Ph., 
Earl R. Thomas, B. Sc, Prin 



Alice M. Tooley, B. Ph., 

Mary Tooley, B. Ph., 

Elbert B. Tuttle, B. Sc. in 

J. Edger Van Lieu, B. Sc, in E. 

Maude Wakefield, B. Ph. 

Roy A. Walker, B. Sc, in E. E., 312 E 9th St. 

John C. Welch, B. Sc, in E. E., Schenectady, 



Jeannette M. Younie, Prusia, B. Sc, Odebolt, 

GRADUATES OF 1900. 



Iowa. 



Linton P. Bennett, B. Sc 
Frank S. Bone, B. Sc, 
John W. Bunker, B. S. A., 
Melville dimming, B. S. A., 
William E. Day, D. V. M., 
Charles W. Deming, D. V. M., 
Leroy L. Diller, B. S. A., 
Ella E. Down, B. Ph., 
Maude F. Eastwood, B. Ph., 
*Charles A. Egger, B. Sc, in E. 
Charles Elmer Ellis B. S. A., 
Estella Ellis, B. Ph. 
Fred W. Faurot, B. Sc, 
Archibald L. Haecker, B. S. A., 
Hattie HasBrouck, B. Ph., 
Paul Henson, B. Sc, 
William A. Houghton, B. S. A., 
Delia M. Johnson, B. Ph., 
Samuel P. Johnson, B. Sc, in E, 
Western L. Johnson, D. V. M. 
Birdie C. Kegley, B. Sc, 



Custer, 
Hopeville, 
New Providence, 
Truro, 
St. Joseph, 
Union Meal Co., Portland, Oregon. 
1639 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
C. C. C. C, Des Moines, Iowa. 



Washington. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Canada. 

Missouri. 



E., 



Cedar City, 



Susa A. (Kelsey),Breckson, B. Ph., Manchester, 



Utah. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Chinook, Montana. 

Norway, Iowa. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

!.. Paton, Iowa . 
108 W. 12th St., Pueblo, Colorado. 

Olympia, Washington. 



Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



343 



Ada L. Knight, B. Ph., 
Edwin G. LeClere, B. Sc 
Sybil Mehitable Lentner, 
Martin Lewis. B. M. E., 
John L. Love, D. V. M., 
Frederick H. Marshall, B. 
William H. Mast, B. S. A. 
John Francis McBirney, B 



Ames, Iowa. 

Quanah, Texas. 

B. Sc, Ottumwa, Iowa. 

1004 Bluff St., Dubuque, Iowa. 
Still School of Osteophy, Des Moines, Iowa. 



S. A., Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Halsey, 


Neb. 


Sc, in E. E. f C. & G. W. 


Ry., Byron, 




Illinois. 


Creston, 


Iowa. 


Sc, E. Waterloo, 


Iowa. 


Montezuma, 


Iowa. 


E. E , 


Iowa. 


Grundy Center, 


Iowa. 




Iowa. 


Belle Plaine, 


Iowa. 


What Cheery 


Iowa. 


Roland, 


Iowa. 


. S. Bureau of Animal Industry, 


Salt Lake City, Utah. 


Decorah, 


Iowa. 


Audubon, 


Iowa. 


Ames, 


Iowa. 


,., Ames, 


Iowa. 



Wilson F. McDill, B. S. A., 
Alexander D. McKinley, B. 
Nellie M. Nicholas, B. Ph., 
Brete C. Nowlan, B. Sc, in 
A. Estella Paddock, B. Sc 
Henry J. Palmer, B. S. A. 
Foster F. Parker, D. V. M., 
Sophia Schott, B. Ph., 
Ira J. Scott, B. Sc, 
Frisbie T. Suit, D. V. M., U 

Hall H. Thomas, B. Sc, 

Charles S. White, B. Sc, 

Evahn R. Walker, B. Sc, 

Wilbur M. Wilson, B. M. E 

Roy W. Wortman, B. Sc„ in E. E., 1279 W Polk, Chicago, Illinois. 



GRADUATES OF 1901. 



Jacob Blumer, B. S. A., 
Merle C. Crane, B. S. A., 
Herbert C. Eckles, B. S. A., 
W. D. Fitzwater, B Sc , 
Herman F. Garver, B. C. E., 
C. Earl Gray, B. S. A., 
Ernest H. Hall, B. S. A., 



Luverne, 

Ames, 

Marshalltown, 

Des Moines, 

Toledo, 

Columbus Junction, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Ohio. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 



Iowa City, 
Henry S. Hopkins, B. S. A., Amer. Casern. Co., Bainbridge, 

New York. 
Jas. F. Horner, B. S. A., Pacific, Missouri. 

Ole Hovland, B. Sc in E. E., 288 Ashland, Bvd., Chicago, Illinois. 
Roland J. Kinzer, B. S. A., Ames, Iowa. 

Willis E. Lamb, B. Sc. in E. E., 288 Ashland Ave,, Chicago, Illinois. 
J. C. Lathrop, B. C. E., N. Y., Edison Co., 55 Dubuque St., New York. 
James Madsen, D. V. M., Ames, Iowa. 

F. G. Miller, B. S. A., Red Oak, Iowa. 

Edgar C. Myers, B. S. A., Ames, Iowa. 

Rufus C. Obrecht, B. S. A., Exp. Sta., Stillwater, Oklahoma. 

Elmer Peshak, B. Sc, in E. E., Atlanta, Georgia. 



Hattie A. Pike, B. Sc, 
Harry R. Porter, B. S. A., 
Edw. E. Savre, B. Sc in E. E., 
Geo. F. Sokol, B. S. A., 
Ernest D. Stivers, B. Sc, 
Geo. A. Taylor, B. C. E., 



Ames, Iowa. 

Grafton, Nebraska. 

Ill Loomis St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Clermont, Iowa. 

Mason City, Iowa. 

1312 Dawson St., Toledo, Ohio. 



344 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Jno. Edgar Van Liew, B. C. E., 1312 Dawson St., Toledo, Ohio. 

Dan A. Wallace, B. S. A., Arlington, Hotel, Galesburg, Illinois. 

E. H. Webster, B. S. A., Supt. of Continental Creamery, Topeka, 

Kansas. 

GRADUATES OF 1902. 



Fred R. Ahlers, D. V. M., 
Joseph C. Austin, B. M. E., 
Arthur F. Baldwin, D. V. M., 
Florence D. Barber, B. Sc, 
Josephine Barclay, B. Sc, 
L. May Barger, B. Sc, 
Jesse D. Bell, B. S. A., 
Herbert A. Bennett, B. C. E., 
Geo. W. Blanche, D. V. M., 
Walter C. Bower, D. V. M., 
Franklin Brown, B. S. A., 
Grace Campbell, B. Sc, 
Joseph R. Campbell, D. V. M, 
George L. Carter, B. Sc, 
Mark P. Cleghorn, B. Sc. in E 
John S. Coye, B. Sc, 
Clarence L. Elliott, D. V. M., 
Frank D. Elwell, B. M. E., 
Fred N. Elwell, D. V. M., 
J. T. Felton, B. Sc in E. E., 
J. Herman Frandson, B. S. A 
John H. Gould, D. V. M., 
Ralph F. Graham, D. V. M., 
Emma Hancock, B. Sc, 
Sam M. Hanger, B. S. A., 



Lamotte, Iowa. 

Topeka, Kansas. 

1515 Center St., Des Moines, Iowa. 



Ames, 

West Liberty, 
Ontario, 
Bellwood, 
American Bridge < 
Belle Plaine, 
Fort Worth, 
Boone, 
Newton, 



E., 



.o., 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Neb. 
Pittsburg, Penn. 

Iowa. 

Texas. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 
1034 Enos Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Rock Valley, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Red Oak, Iowa. 

Sioux City, Iowa. 

295 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 
Ames, Iowa. 

Neola, Iowa. 

,, Story City, Iowa. 

Fairmont, Minnesota. 

Colfax, Iowa. 

West Union, Iowa. 

Durango, Colorado. 

E. C. Higgins, B. Sc in E. E., 295 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 



Newton, 
Ames, 
Ames, 

E., Correctionville, 
Coon Rapids, 
Coon Rapids, 
Des Moines, 



J. G. Hummell, B. M. E., 

William H. Hurst, D. V. M., 

Thyra M. Hytland, B. Sc, 

Alexander T. Jenkins. B. Sc in E 

Ada M.Jenks, B. Sc, 

Frances A. Jenks, B. Sc, 

Robert R. Keith, 

Walter T. Kelly. B. M. E., 251 Milwaukee Ave. E 

Christian Larsen, B. S. A., 

Ernest E. Lee, B. M. E., 

H. J. Ludwig, B. C. E., 

W. H. Lytle, D. V. M., 

Clive G. Martin, D. V. M., 

J. Francis McBirney. B. C. E., C 

Harry B. McClure, B. S. A., 

Homer A. Mclntire, D. V. M., 

Clarence R. McKinney, B. Sc, Ames, 

Alice Merritt. B. Sc, Ames, 

Mae Miller, B. Sc, Ames, 

Walter E. Miller, D. V. M., 1120 26th St., Des Moines, 



Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 

Iowa. 
Detroit, Michigan. 
Ames, Iowa. 

726 W. 63rd Court, Chicago, Illinois. 
Houston, Texas. 

Jefferson, Iowa. 

Washington, D. C. 

G.-W. Ry., Dubuque, Iowa. 
Dallas Center, 
Ames, 



Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 
Iowa. 






LIST OF GRADUATES 



345 



Chas. M. Morgan, D. V. M., 
M. Ethelda Morrison, B. Sc, 
Louis R. Muhs, B. C. E., 
T. E. Nichols, B. Sc. in E. E., 
E. R. Nowlan, B. Sc. in E. E. 
Wilbur W. Otto, B. Sc, 
Luella R. Rantschler, B. Sc, 
Newton C. Rew, B. C. A., 
W. C. Scholty, D. V. M., 
Henry G. Skinner, B. S. A., 
A.Clyde Slifer, B. Sc, 856 Fi 
Margaret B. Stanton, B. Sc, 
Stephen W. Stevens, B. Sc, 
J. Edgar Stewart, B. C. E., 
Walter Stuhr, D. V. M., 
Clyde W. Warburton, B. S. A 
Franklin M. Weakley, B. Sc. 

Chas. A.Welsh, B. C. E., 
Arthur L. Wood, D. V. M., 



Armour, S. Dakota. 

Ames, Iowa. 

American Bridge Co., Pittsburg, Penn. 
219 S. Sixth St., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



Denver, Colorado. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Pueblo, Colorado. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Osage, Iowa. 

Brookings, S. Dakota, 

fth Ave., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

St. Louis, Missouri. 

Ames, Iowa. 

Ames, Iowa. 

., Independence, Iowa, 

in Min. Eng., 5263 Vernon St., 

St. Louis, Missouri. 
5085 Morgan St., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Hampton, Iowa. 



INDEX 



Accredited Schools 37 

Advanced Standing 48 

Agriculture, Division of 51 

Agronomy 56 

Dairying 64 

Animal Husbandry 73 

Horticulture and Forestry... 80 

Agriculture, Courses in 91 

Agriculture, Faculty in 52 

Agronomy, Department of 56 

Alumni --318 

Animal Husbandry, Department 

of 73 

Associations, Religious 46 

Beardshear, W. M 9 

Botany, Department of 240 

Buildings 24 

Callendar 2 

Ceramics, Course in 203 

Chemistry, Agricultural 232 

Chemistry, General, Dept. of... 232 

Civil Engineering, Dept. of 162 

Civil Engineering, Course in 179 

Corn judging 62 

Courses of Study, General Infor- 
mation 47 

Dairying, Department of 64 

Domestic Art... 259 

Domestic Economy 256 

Domestic Science 257 

Domestic Art 259 

Domestic Science 257 

Domestic Science, Course in 214 

Economic Science, Dept. of 255 

Electrical Engineering, Dept.of-.182 

Electrical Eng., Course in 189 

Elocution and Oratory, Dept. of. 267 

Engineering, Division of 139 

Mechanical Engineering 149 

Civil Engineering 162 

Electrical Engineering 182 

Mining Engineering 191 

Ceramics ...203 

English 263 

Entrance Requirements 28 

Examinations — Sample 31-33 

Expenses, Students' 42 

Experiment Station 109 

Experiment Station Staff 18 

Faculty — General 13 

Facilities, Special 

Agriculture.. 52 

Veterinary Science 114 

Engineering 140 

General and Domes. Science. 206 
Forestry, Horticulture and, De- 
partment of 80 



French 272 

Geology, Department of— 251 

German 273 

Historical 20 

History, Department of 273 

Horticulture and Forestry, De- 
partment of 80 

Hospital, College 43 

Instruction— officers of 13 

Labor, Manual 44 

Languages, Department of 272 

Library 278 

Literary Societies 46 

Literature and Rhet., Dept. of.. .261 

Mathematics, Department of 220 

Mechanical Engineering, Depart- 
ment of 149 

Mechanical Engineering, Course 

in 159 

Memorial, Dr. W. M. Beardshear 9 

Military Science, Dept. of 277 

Mining Eng., Dept. of 191 

Mining Eng. Course in 199 

Music, Department of 279 

Oratory, Elocution and Depart- 
ment of 267 

Philosophy, Dept. of 260 

Physical Culture 267 

Physics, Dept. of 228 

Post-Graduate Courses 49 

Prizes 46, 63, 78 

Prizes, Corn Judging 63 

Prizes, Stock Judging 78 

Regulations, General 48 

Rhetoric, Literature and, Depart- 
ment of... 261 

Schools, Accredited 37 

Science, Division of 205 

Mathematics 220 

Physics 228 

Chemistry 232 

Botany 240 

Zoology. 247 

Geology 251 

Economic Science 255 

Domestic Economy 256 

Military Science 277 

Science, Course in 210 

Science, Faculty in 206 

Special Courses 47 

Stock Judging 77 

Student's alphabetical list of 285 

Theses 48 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Veterinary Medicine, Course in. -134 

Veterinary Science, Div. of 113 

Zoology, Department of 247 



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